Three Ways to Make Low Carb More Enjoyable

What do you believe about low carb? We asked our members and got over 2,600 replies. Here are the results:

what-do-you-believe-most-strongly

As you can see, nearly eight in ten members believe low carb works which is awesome. And, perhaps even more inspiring – less than 4% of members believe low carb is painful or dangerous. Pretty cool.

But not all is good.

Making low carb enjoyable

Only 11% of members feel low carb is primarily enjoyable (even more so than knowing that it works). Our mission is to make low carb simple and for that to happen people need to truly enjoy the low-carb lifestyle.

What must change for low carb to feel enjoyable? We think three things are especially important:
 

1. Let people eat their favorite foods


Bread, pizza, and desserts – that’s a lot to give up. What if you didn’t have to?

To make low carb enjoyable we need to provide people with fantastic and healthy low-carb versions of their favorite foods.

We have started doing that. Here are some of our favorites:

What other old favorite foods are you missing? Please tell us in the comments below.

For many people the thought of giving up alcohol would be unbearable too. What if you didn’t have to? Check out our guide to low-carb alcohol:

Low-Carb Alcohol

 

2. Make low carb totally delicious


For low carb to be enjoyable people must love low-carb foods in general. For this reason we are investing heavily in creating the world’s most simple and delicious low-carb recipes.

Here are some of our favorites:

What new low-carb recipes would you love? Please tell us in the comments below.
 

3. Get your family and friends on board


Living the low-carb lifestyle alone can be hard. One way to make low carb more enjoyable is to get your family or friends on board. Here are two quick tips for how:

First, be an awesome role model. Let your family and friends see how much better you are feeling, how much weight you are losing, and how good you are looking. Live the low-carb lifestyle instead of preaching about it and people may start showing an interest in what you are doing.

Second, serve delicious foods. Introduce your family and friends to low carb by cooking delicious low-carb meals. Once people experience how tasty low carb is they may become more open to change.

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12 Comments

  1. tz
    The problem is if you hate to cook or aren't good at it - separating eggs, ricing cauliflower, mixing psyllium husk (ismthat real food?)...
    There isn't a line of low-carb prepackaged dinners.
    And you want fresh vegetables, so it's a trip to the grocer or freeze dry (the latter works well, but I still have to prepare in bulk)
    Reply: #6
  2. Lori Miller
    Atkins has a line of frozen dinners that taste good. Snack bars, too.
  3. Stealth
    Atkins frozen meals are not really low carb. They typically have around 28 g of carbs per serving and lower the net carb count by fiber additives like modified potato and corn starch, wheat gluten, and a host of other processed dreck. Atkins meals are not real food.
    Reply: #7
  4. Niclas
    Maybe there's no contradiction. LCHF is for a majority of practitioners both enjoyable and well functioning. Such questionnaire has it's limitations.
  5. Barb
    I have found the low carb buns to be a real winner especially for making kid lunches. To me, they taste like a whole wheat bun which allows for lots of possibilities. I cut them in half to make mini pizzas or toast in the morning with peanut butter, garlic bread, hamburgers, pulled pork sandwiches, breakfast sandwich...so many ways to take advantage. Thanks for that one-it has allowed lots of variety in our home.
  6. Apicius
    Tz,
    You have two choices...one is learn how to cook. The other is learn how to cope with obesity and taking diabetes medication. I choose the first one.

    You don't have to start with the ultra complicated recipes. It does not take great skill to disassemble a rotisserie chicken, fry a beef steak or toss a salad.

    Perhaps a good advice for cooking starters who hate to cook is get a slow cooker. You can make a huge variety of roasts, stews, chilis, soups, etc...very simple steps to follow....with very cheap cuts of meat. Make lots in one batch, freeze extras in batches, ready for reheat and serve in a jiffy.

  7. Lori Miller
    There are a lot of Atkins frozen meals with much lower carb counts. As to quality, the question is, compared to what? For people in assisted living or a dormitory, or who are disabled, or can't cook for whatever reason, Atkins frozen meals might be far better than the available alternatives.

    It ISN'T a choice between eating pristine, home-cooked food and eating random crap. Remember Fathead, where Tom Naughton ate a limited-carb diet of fast food for a month and lost 12 pounds? For someone who is on the road, fast food may be the only choice besides going hungry.

    Fast food (with limited carbs) and lower-carb Atkins dinners have their drawbacks, and for most people they shouldn't be the first choice, but they're a huge improvement over starchy institutional food or a high carb "value meal."

    Reply: #8
  8. Apicius
    Not sure I am following your logic, Lori. A piece of frozen salmon (or sole or haddock or cod or....etc) can be microwaved with a piece of butter just as easily as a crappy Atkins frozen dinner. You can even place frozen asparagus (or frozen broccoli or frozen kale or frozen green beans or frozen cauliflower...etc) with more butter in the same microwave. Squeeze of lemon juice...and delicious!!! Seems like making excuses for not finding a way to eat healthy whole food provides crappy processed food manufacturers with opportunity to exploit disenfranchised eaters. What a whole load of baseless excuses I'm reading in the forum today!
  9. Diane
    This is a great recipe that we have been enjoying with LCHF dips lately: http://the-lowcarb-diet.com/low-carb-breadsticks/

    Could be a good one to add to the site?

  10. Patty
    I totally agree with Apicius!!! If you are completely "unable" to cook for yourself then the person cooking for you can do any of these recipes on this site. I love to cook, so trying new things is fun for me. Using a microwave is as easy as it gets!! Buying all that processed Atkins food is just laziness and if you want to get everything this site has to offer you should at least make an attempt to try and learn to prepare some of these delicious recipes. Otherwise you are just setting yourself up to fail!! Cooking is easier than most people think. In my opinion (and that's just MY opinion) if you can read and follow directions you can cook!!! Stop making lame excuses and start to get slim and healthy!!
  11. Judy
    I haven't looked at the recipes above, but are there recipes for just using the slow cooker as Apiciud suggests? We have one of those on a cupboard shelf in the laundry room and NEVER have used it. We don't have a workable oven, but do have a microwave. Last night my husband steamed a big head of cauliflower and I took half of it and put it in the blender with butter and heavy whipped cream and made myself some mashed "potatoes" which were really yummy. Hard part was cleaning that big old blender out afterwards!!!
  12. Jen W
    Folks starting out on LCHF have an amazing resource here at DietDoctor!
    All at the ready!
    My research took months, then many more months to work out what worked for me. Still ongoing, as my needs change :)
    DietDotor has fabulous recipes, information and support!
    Superb!
    I'm living LCHF/Keto since 2014, healing, slimming and happier!
    With grateful thanks for your Purpose, Goodness Mission and Visions!
    Well Doing! (As in-Not Done)
    Cheers Jen, Australia

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