14-day ketogenic diet meal plan

What is a keto diet? Eating keto means limiting your net carb intake to 20 grams per day. If you’re looking to maximize benefits like reversing type 2 diabetes or if you have a lot of weight to lose, the keto diet may be right for you.

If you want more carbs and don’t have type 2 diabetes or much weight to lose, then a more moderate low-carb diet might be for you. Moderate low carb is easier to follow, but may be less effective than keto, meaning you may get more moderate results.

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Top 3 keto cooking tips

  1. Automate breakfast: Choose one keto breakfast to eat every day, like scrambled eggs.1 Not hungry? Skip breakfast and sip a coffee instead.2 This saves time and money.
  2. Simplify with meal prep. Cook two servings for dinner and refrigerate the second serving for tomorrow’s lunch. Freeze other portions for later.
  3. Try no-cook plates. Sliced deli meats, cheeses, and veggies make an easy lunch. Here are many more.

Avoid keto flu

Drink lots of fluids and get enough salt, especially during the first week, to minimize symptoms of the initial “keto flu.”3 For example, a cup of bouillon 1-2 times per day really helps.4

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Who should NOT do a keto diet?

A keto low-carb, high-fat diet appears to be very safe for most people.5 However, in the following three situations you may need extra support:

  • Are you on medication for diabetes, e.g. insulin? More
  • Are you on medication for high blood pressure? More
  • Are you breastfeeding? More

If you’re not in any of these situations you should be good to go.

Disclaimer: While the ketogenic diet has many proven health benefits (e.g. weight loss, reversal of type 2 diabetes) it’s still controversial. Most importantly, there may be a need to adapt pre-existing medications (see above). Discuss any changes in medication and relevant lifestyle changes with your doctor. Full disclaimer

This diet plan is for adults with health issues, including obesity, that could benefit from a keto diet.

 

 

Week 1 of the keto diet meal plan

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Week 2 of the keto diet meal plan

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Feel free to adjust this sample keto diet plan by making it vegetarian, dairy-free, or choosing from hundreds of other keto recipes.

 

 

Shopping lists and more

Do you want to get weekly shopping lists for the 14-day keto diet menu above? Lists that adapt to the number of people you choose to cook for and if you want to skip or change a few meals?

Just sign up for a (no commitment, cancel online anytime) and you’ll get these two and 90+ more complete weekly keto meal plans for free:

Keto: Week 1 of 14-day keto diet plan

This meal plan is the first week of our free 14-day keto diet plan. As a member you’ll get it complete with a shopping list and the possibility of changing the number of servings. This meal plan will give you a great variety of keto dishes and helps you stay below 20 grams of carbs per day.

Full meal plan →

Keto: Week 2 of 14-day keto diet plan

This meal plan is the second week of our free 14-day keto diet plan. As a member you’ll get it complete with a shopping list and the possibility of changing the number of servings. This meal plan will give you a great variety of keto dishes and helps you stay below 20 grams of carbs per day.

Full meal plan →

 


 

Premium ketogenic meal plans – including shopping lists

Do you want many more weekly keto meal plans and menus, including shopping lists and easily printable recipe guides? Check out our premium meal plan tool, available with lots of other bonus material with a
 
Here are examples of the keto meal plans you can get. There are also quick and easy, budget-friendly and many more options. These meal plans require a to view.

Keto: Few ingredient meals #2

Keep it simple with this amazing ketogenic meal plan that is packed with delicious meals but only uses just a few ingredients. You get to enjoy three meals per day and you’ll still keep below 14 g of net carbs per day. Great, huh?

To make your shopping list even shorter you don’t need to use different kinds of cheeses, just go with your favorite one. Mozzarella will work with all of the recipes but if you like more flavor go with a tasty, sharp cheddar instead.

You can also skip fresh herbs and use dried spices and veggies that you already have at home.

Full meal plan →

Keto: Budget-friendly #4 (16:8)

This ketogenic meal plan (below 16 g net carbs per day) will keep both your carb intake and your costs down. But don’t worry, your taste buds and your satisfaction won’t be a casualty of lower costs. These meals are far from boring. And they’re filling, too. You won’t be hungry between meals — especially if you are keto-adapted and used to intermittent fasting)!

We have focused on affordable low-carb ingredients such as ground beef, chicken thighs, canned tuna, and cauliflower. Then we’ve added a lot of flavor with delicious cheeses and spices.

If you want to cut costs even more you can replace the avocado in the tuna salad (if you are not lucky enough to find avocados on sale) with more vegetables. A drizzle of some extra olive oil on the salad will compensate for the reduction of fat from the avocado. You can also substitute any of cheeses in the recipes for other types of cheese that you may find on sale.

In this weekly meal plan we are also skipping breakfast to boost weight loss and provide other health benefits. Read more about fasting here. And of course, by skipping a meal each day you are saving even more money, and you’re saving precious time, too.

Full meal plan →

Keto: Vegetarian #3

Here’s a wonderful weekly meal plan filled with delicious keto-friendly lacto-ovo vegetarian dishes. Three hearty meals per day while keeping the carbs under 20 g per day. This week you’re going to eat gnocchi with homemade basil pesto, quesadillas, cheese pie with mushrooms and a lovely goat cheese salad, just to name a few!

Full meal plan →

Keto: Dairy free #5

Most of us LOVE dairy products in all shapes and forms, but it’s possible that skipping or reducing them in your diet could speed up your weight loss and be beneficial for your health. This is because dairy products contain not only milk sugar (lactose), but also milk protein (casein), which stimulates insulin secretion more than many other types of protein, and can trigger overeating.

But skipping dairy for whatever reason does not mean you have to eat boring food! This flavorful ketogenic meal plan is tasty, healthy and will keep you below 17 g net carbs per day.

Full meal plan →

Team Diet Doctor: Darya's keto favorites

Want to try intermittent fasting but not sure how to start? Follow Darya’s meal plan! A graphic designer at Diet Doctor, she eats a ketogenic diet and works out twice a week. While she enjoys cooking on the weekend, during the weekdays she usually cooks easy, quick meals and often skips breakfast. So this meal plan is perfect if you want to do intermittent fasting (16:8) Darya’s way! Then splurge on yummy keto breakfasts on the weekend.

This meal plan keeps you below 17 g net carbs per day.

Full meal plan →

 

More

A ketogenic diet for beginners
Ketogenic diet foods – what to eat and what to avoid

More keto recipes

 

 

Get started

For everything you need to get started – keto meal plans, shopping lists, daily tips and troubleshooting – just sign up for our free 2-week keto low-carb challenge:

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Keto diet meal plan Q&A

Here are some of the most common questions about our keto diet plan. For even more questions and answers see our full keto diet FAQ.

 

I don’t like meat/eggs/dairy/[insert disliked food]. Can I still do a keto diet?

Sure. Just replace the thing you dislike with something else that is keto-friendly. It’s quite possible to eat a vegetarian keto diet, an egg-free keto diet and a dairy-free keto diet – and many other versions.

See our keto foods guidelines

 

Do I have to count calories on a keto diet?

No, you don’t have to.6 Many people get so satisfied on a low-carb, high-fat keto diet – with less hunger – that they automatically eat less and lose excess weight.7 This appears to be especially true if you base your diet on real keto foods, and try to only eat when you’re hungry.8

Fat burning is also improved on a keto diet.9 This, however, does not mean that you can eat any amount of food and still lose weight. If you eat enough fat, the body will only need to burn that, not your stored body fat. That can stop weight loss.

Common issues that can trip people up is snacking on delicious cheeses (when not hungry), or eating salted nuts (when not hungry) or eating baked keto goods, keto cookies etc. (when not hungry). It’s very easy to keep eating just because it tastes good. If you want to lose weight, try to only eat when you’re hungry, even on keto diet.

Learn more: Should you count calories on a low-carb or keto diet?

 

Can I drink alcohol on a keto diet?

Yes. But stick to low-carb alcoholic drinks, like dry wine or sugar-free drinks.

Full keto alcohol guide

 

What are healthy fats on a keto diet?

Good examples include butter, olive oil, coconut oil, full-fat dairy (including heavy cream) and avocado oil.

Avoid low-fat products. On a low-carb diet like the keto diet, fat burning is significantly increased, and it’s OK to eat a higher-fat diet.10

Full keto fats, sauces and oils guide

 

How few carbs should I target on keto, and should I count net or total carbs?

On a keto diet we recommend below 20 grams of net carbs per day, and that’s what our keto recipes are aiming for.11

Some people may need to moderate protein intake somewhat, as high protein intake (greater than 2.0g/kg/d) may make it more difficult to maintain ketosis. Although there is controversy how real of an issue this is, it may especially apply in the beginning for those who are very insulin resistant.12 However, eating too little protein may also present health issues such as poor muscle development, increased hunger, and lack of essential amino acids. That is why we recommend a moderate level of protein intake, defined as 1.2-1.7g/kg/d. See our protein guide.

Using our keto recipes or keto diet meal plans means you do not have to count to stay keto – we’ll do the counting for you. You can also follow our keto foods guidelines, and you can fairly easily stay on a keto plan without counting the carbs (though it may still be smart to count once in a while, just to make sure).

Learn more

 
Full keto diet FAQ


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  1. Do you worry about eating saturated fats or cholesterol? There’s no good reason to do so. While still a bit controversial, repeated modern systematic reviews find no benefit from avoiding saturated fats, or replacing them with unsaturated fats:

    Here’s a study investigating if eating eggs for breakfast every day has any negative effects on cholesterol levels. They found none, but the egg-eating group reported greater satiety:

    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2015: The effect of a high-egg diet on cardiovascular risk factors in people with type 2 diabetes: the Diabetes and Egg (DIABEGG) study-a 3-mo randomized controlled trial [moderate evidence]

  2. It’s often claimed that eating breakfast is good for weight control. That appears to be false:

    British Medical Journal 2019: Effect of breakfast on weight and energy intake: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials [strong evidence]

    The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2009: The effectiveness of breakfast recommendations on weight loss: a randomized controlled trial [moderate evidence]

    Furthermore, reduced hunger is common on a keto diet, so many people find it easy to skip one meal:

    Obesity Reviews 2014: Do ketogenic diets really suppress appetite? A systematic review and meta-analysis [strong evidence]

  3. The “keto flu” is a set of common early side effects like headache, feeling tired, nausea, lack of concentration, brain fog etc. Learn more

  4. This is mainly based on the consistent experience of experienced clinicians [weak evidence]. But there’s also some support from this study that found only minor increases in side effects, while advising participants to drink bouillon:

    Nutrition & Metabolism 2008: The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus [moderate evidence]

  5. The main fear about lower-carb and higher-fat diets have always been a concern about potential increase in the risk of heart disease. However, interventional studies so far indicate that if anything the risk appears to decrease:

    For more health controversies regarding a keto diet, have a look at this page:

    Low-carb controversies

  6. While calories count, you probably don’t have to count them for good results. Low-carb diets tend to result in more weight loss, even though most studies of it do not advocate counting calories:

    British Journal of Nutrition 2016: Effects of low-carbohydrate diets v. low-fat diets on body weight and cardiovascular risk factors: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. [strong evidence for more weight loss]

    New England Journal of Medicine 2008: Weight loss with a low-carbohydrate, mediterranean, or low-fat diet [moderate evidence]

    Learn more here: Should you count calories on a low-carb or keto diet?

  7. Obesity Reviews 2014: Do ketogenic diets really suppress appetite? A systematic review and meta-analysis [strong evidence]

  8. Learn more about eating when hungry

    What is “real” keto foods? This is a fairly complicated question to answer. But basically, focus on eating good quality, minimally processed real food. Ideally the food you buy shouldn’t even have a list of ingredients (or it should be very short). And to be keto, it has to be very low in carbs:

    Keto foods guide

  9. When eating very few carbohydrates, the body turns primarily to burning fat for energy – i.e. fewer carbs and more fat is burned for energy. But that’s not necessarily the whole reason. In fact, under some circumstances people tend to also burn more calories overall on a low-carb diet:

    British Medical Journal 2018: Effects of a low carbohydrate diet on energy expenditure during weight loss maintenance: randomized trial [moderate evidence]

  10. Learn more in these guides:

    Healthy fats on a keto or low-carb diet

    Vegetable oils: What we know and what we don’t

    A user guide to saturated fat

  11. Using exactly the level of 20 grams of net carbs is mainly based on convention, and that it’s often been used in scientific studies of strict low-carb diets (like this one).

    According to consistent experience this level tends to be quite effective for most people in getting them into ketosis. This is based on clinical experience of low-carb practitioners and was unanimously agreed upon by our low-carb expert panel. You can learn more about our panel here [weak evidence].

    One study compared a 20gm carb diet to a 50 and 100gram carb diet in healthy volunteers. The 50- and 20- gram subjects consistently stayed in ketosis. But it is not known if the same applies for those with insulin resistance or diabetes. Plus, there is not yet any RCT comparing longer term health benefits between two low-carb diets of varying strictness. But RCTs of strict low-carb diets appear to often show better results, compared to RCTs of more moderate or liberal low-carb diets:

    Obesity Reviews 2016: Impact of low‐carbohydrate diet on body composition: meta‐analysis of randomized controlled studies [strong evidence for fat mass loss on very low-carb diets in particular]

    RCTs of low-carb interventions for weight loss

  12. This is mainly based on clinical experience. [weak evidence]