Slow-cooked bone broth - 3 ways!

Slow-cooked bone broth – 3 ways!

Super simple to make and perfect on keto. Your choice! Prepare by 1) Instant Pot/pressure cooker 2) Slow cooker or 3) Stovetop. Bone broth is your best friend during intermittent fasting... or anytime. Homemade, soothing, and rich in nutrients. We can almost smell the wholesome aroma of bone broth. "Bone Appetit!"

Slow-cooked bone broth – 3 ways!

Super simple to make and perfect on keto. Your choice! Prepare by 1) Instant Pot/pressure cooker 2) Slow cooker or 3) Stovetop. Bone broth is your best friend during intermittent fasting... or anytime. Homemade, soothing, and rich in nutrients. We can almost smell the wholesome aroma of bone broth. "Bone Appetit!"
USMetric
4 servingservings

Ingredients

  • 5 lbs 2.3 kg beef bone, or lamb, or a combination of the twobeef bones, or lamb, or a combination of the two
  • 3 tbsp 3 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 (4 oz.) 1 (110 g) yellow onion, roughly choppedyellow onions, roughly chopped (optional)
  • carrot roughly choppedcarrots roughly chopped (optional)
  • 1 1 whole garlic unpeeled & slightly crushedwhole garlics unpeeled & slightly crushed (optional)
  • 1 tbsp 1 tbsp salt
  • 1 tsp 1 tsp black peppercornblack peppercorns
  • fresh thyme or fresh parsley
  • 1 tbsp 1 tbsp white wine vinegar
  • water
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Instructions

Roasting the bones

  1. Preheat the oven to 450°F (225°C).
  2. Place bones in a baking dish with sides. Brush the bones with melted coconut oil, coating thoroughly.
  3. Roast until the bones are properly browned. This will take about 1-1.5 hours; turn once, about half way through. Add a cup or two of water towards the end to prevent the juices and flavors accumulating in the dish from burning.

Instant Pot/pressure cooking

  1. Roast the bones following step 1-3.
  2. Place the bones, herbs, vegetables (if using) and vinegar into the Instant Pot. Completely cover the ingredients with cold water, leaving some space below the “MAX fill” line.
  3. Place and lock the lid on the Instant Pot. Move the lid’s steam release handle to the “Sealing” position.
  4. On the control panel, select the “Manual” setting/high pressure, and adjust the cook time to 120 minutes. It can take anywhere from 10 to 40 minutes, within the 120-minute cook-time, to preheat the pot to full pressure.
  5. When the cook time is up, let the pressure release naturally (approx. 10-15 minutes), until the float valve drops down. Prior to removing the lid, move the vent handle to the “venting” position, to release any extra pressure.
  6. Strain the broth over a bowl using a mesh strainer, or cheesecloth. The broth is done when it’s deep brown in color and deeply flavorful. Season the broth with salt and pepper, to taste. Cool broth to room temperature and then transfer to airtight container(s).

Slow cooker

  1. Roast the bones following step 1-3.
  2. Place the bones, herbs, vegetables (if using), and vinegar into the slow cooker. Fill the slow cooker with water, completely covering the ingredients. Set the temperature to low, and cook for 12-18 hours. The broth is done when it’s deep brown in color and deeply flavorful. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.
  3. Strain the broth into a bowl using a mesh strainer or cheesecloth. Cool broth to room temperature and then transfer to airtight container(s).

    Stovetop

  1. Roast the bones following step 1-3.
  2. Transfer the bones, herbs, vegetables (if using) and vinegar into a big pot. Add water to cover the ingredients by a few inches. Boil for 10-15 minutes. Lower the heat and let simmer for 8-24 hours. The broth is done when it’s deep brown in color and flavorful. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.
  3. Strain the broth into a bowl using a mesh strainer or cheesecloth. Cool broth to room temperature and then transfer to airtight container(s).
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79 comments

  1. patkinson87
    The ingredients listed does not mention how much vinegar or tomato sauce to use. Based on previous comments, I should use apple cider vinegar, but how much? Also, how much tomato sauce and is canned tomato sauce ok? Should the onion, carrots, celery be left whole or chopped or just cut in halves or quarters?
  2. Aileen Bautista
    How much apple cider vinegar and tomato sauce?
  3. ch1959uk
    For those wondering how much cider apple vinegar to use well just a really good splash. it does not taste in the finished product. Also you can use any bones ( grass fed are obviously better ). You do not need to roast the veg just put it in the saucepan with the roasted or raw bones. As for water, cover everything by about 2 inches or so. Put a lid on, bring to boil and then turn down to a mere simmer and continue cooking from 6 -24 hrs, if you are using any mixture that includes beef bones go for a long simmer 12 hours plus. If you are worried about evaporation just top up with cold water and carry on.
    Finally, in my recipe i put 2 bay leaves and 5 black peppercorns and a couple of celery sticks. I never put tomato paste or carrots in mine because it is fine without them. I also do mine in a pressure cooker on high for 3 hours then low for 6 hours.
    hope this helps .
  4. Lianne
    The ingredients list does not specify either vinegar or tomato sauce - can this please be rectified? I have no idea of quantity or type.
    Thanks
    Reply: #56
  5. 1 comment removed
  6. Kerry Merritt Team Diet Doctor

    The ingredients list does not specify either vinegar or tomato sauce - can this please be rectified? I have no idea of quantity or type.
    Thanks

    Thanks for bringing this to our attention. For the time being, we've removed the tomato sauce and added the vinegar amount to the ingredients list.

  7. miriamdabrowa
    Is it necessary to remove the fat after cooking? I read different opinions.
    Reply: #58
  8. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor

    Is it necessary to remove the fat after cooking? I read different opinions.

    No, it is not necessary to remove the fat.

  9. Heidi
    after making this bone broth it has colled into a jelly like consistency, how do i consume it now? if i heat it does it liquify and i drink it? or do i add hot water to it like its a concentrate?
    Reply: #60
  10. Crystal Pullen Team Diet Doctor

    after making this bone broth it has colled into a jelly like consistency, how do i consume it now? if i heat it does it liquify and i drink it? or do i add hot water to it like its a concentrate?

    The jelly-like consistency is caused by the collagen. When you reheat it, it will return to a liquid consistency.

  11. Julie
    Thx for the recipe. How much is 1 serving for your calorie calculation? Another source said bone broth is 11kcal per 100ml, which seems low given the fat content. How many ml/cups a day would be allowed in a 72h diet?
    Reply: #62
  12. Crystal Pullen Team Diet Doctor

    Thx for the recipe. How much is 1 serving for your calorie calculation? Another source said bone broth is 11kcal per 100ml, which seems low given the fat content. How many ml/cups a day would be allowed in a 72h diet?

    It is recommended that you calculate the nutritional information for recipes with the specific ingredients you use as recipes will vary as you've noted here. The serving size will also vary for this recipe depending on how much water you use. If you make the 4 serving batch, simply measure out 4 equal servings. You can do this by weight, visual estimate or by dividing it into separate containers.

  13. Derya
    We cook a batch of these every week, the longer you can let it simmer, the better, you want the highest possible nutrient density dissolved.

    We just roast them under the grill of the oven (no coconut oil) for 30 mins to accomplish more aroma. After putting the bones in a huge pot with sea salt, we pour boiling water on the baking tray to get out every bit of goodies there and add them to the pot.

    My husband likes it pure, so we ladle out his portion after 12 hours, and we let mine simmer another 30 mins with a hefty amount of chopped onions and crushed garlic.

    The fact that it GELS in the fridge is very helpful, as you can spoon 1-2 tablespoons in a mug, pour hot water in it, and your DRINK is ready.

    I collect the FAT, that sits on top, in a separate jar, while everything is still hot and liquid, and I USE IT FOR COOKING (try frying broccoli in it or lean minced beef).

    Bone broth is often referred to as LIQUID GOLD, and for a really good reason. I give this recipe to all our patients with leaky gut syndrome, Crohn‘s disease etc., as it heals the gut lining and arguably is therefore very beneficial for autoimmune diseases too.

    Reply: #64
  14. Crystal Pullen Team Diet Doctor

    We cook a batch of these every week, the longer you can let it simmer, the better, you want the highest possible nutrient density dissolved.
    We just roast them under the grill of the oven (no coconut oil) for 30 mins to accomplish more aroma. After putting the bones in a huge pot with sea salt, we pour boiling water on the baking tray to get out every bit of goodies there and add them to the pot.
    My husband likes it pure, so we ladle out his portion after 12 hours, and we let mine simmer another 30 mins with a hefty amount of chopped onions and crushed garlic.
    The fact that it GELS in the fridge is very helpful, as you can spoon 1-2 tablespoons in a mug, pour hot water in it, and your DRINK is ready.
    I collect the FAT, that sits on top, in a separate jar, while everything is still hot and liquid, and I USE IT FOR COOKING (try frying broccoli in it or lean minced beef).
    Bone broth is often referred to as LIQUID GOLD, and for a really good reason. I give this recipe to all our patients with leaky gut syndrome, Crohn‘s disease etc., as it heals the gut lining and arguably is therefore very beneficial for autoimmune diseases too.

    Thank you for your comments and for sharing this with others!

  15. sharintj
    How much of this can you drink a day while fasting?
    Reply: #66
  16. Crystal Pullen Team Diet Doctor

    How much of this can you drink a day while fasting?

    Check out this video from Dr. Jason Fung on what breaks a fat for guidance on consumption during a fast. https://www.dietdoctor.com/video-post-what-breaks-a-fast

  17. Jeannette
    The recipes on this site are so confusing with the ingredients. For example, in this recipe for bone broth it says, "1 whole garlic unpeeled & slightly crushed (optional)". Is that one whole garlic CLOVE, or the whole garlic BULB?
    Reply: #68
  18. Crystal Pullen Team Diet Doctor

    The recipes on this site are so confusing with the ingredients. For example, in this recipe for bone broth it says, "1 whole garlic unpeeled & slightly crushed (optional)". Is that one whole garlic CLOVE, or the whole garlic BULB?

    It is one clove. Thank you for bringing this to our attention.

  19. Derya
    FASTING DAYS - if you follow Megan Ramos/Dr Jason Fung closely, in terms of weight loss you can say bone broth is not a problem. I have 1-3 cups of it on those days (the colder the weather, the more I crave it).
    If it were autophagy you are after, that’s a different thing. That’s water and salt only, e.g. when you do it once every season for e.g. 5 days to prevent cancer, age better, ‘cleanse’. Treating a life-threatening disease obviously isn’t included in this.

    I find that on hot summer days homemade pickle juice is perfect.
    Just wash, peel, chop carrots, weigh them, multiply with 2% to calculate the salt content.
    Example: 400 g carrot pieces >>> 8 g salt. I dissolve the salt in a bit of hot water, pour it into the container (could even be a cleaned jar), top it up with water until everything is ‘underwater’, then leave it on the counter for 4 days.
    You could put in the fridge after those 4 days, though we rarely manage; our children eat them up immediately (nobody cares for fresh carrots anymore), and we adults put the juice in the fridge to have it nice and refreshing.
    You don’t eat the carrots, so don’t be afraid of the carbs.

  20. hala.haddad
    Hello, am new to make broth, wher do you buy bones? i have never seen it at a grocery store (am in canada, montreal). Thank you
    Reply: #71
  21. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor

    Hello, am new to make broth, wher do you buy bones? i have never seen it at a grocery store (am in canada, montreal). Thank you

    You can save the bones after you cook a chicken, steak or other cuts of meat with bone. Some butcher counters will also make the bones available for purchase if you ask.

    Reply: #82
  22. C
    After roasting the n
    Bones do you put the liquid in the pot with the bones then the water? O
    Reply: #73
  23. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor

    After roasting the n
    Bones do you put the liquid in the pot with the bones then the water? O

    The order doesn't matter but yes, it all goes in the pot.

  24. Kimberly
    I put a couple of slabs of pork ribs, some very low-carb BBQ sauce, and a quart of beef bone broth in my slow cooker. Then, I set it on low for 10 hours. It was great!

    The broth diluted the BBQ sauce to make even fewer carbs per serving.

    The bones cooked down to so soft that I was able to grind them into paste with my blender and eat the paste.

    I have plenty of BBQ-flavored broth left for cooking ground meat to make several servings of soup.

    Reply: #75
  25. Kerry Merritt Team Diet Doctor

    I put a couple of slabs of pork ribs, some very low-carb BBQ sauce, and a quart of beef bone broth in my slow cooker. Then, I set it on low for 10 hours. It was great!
    The broth diluted the BBQ sauce to make even fewer carbs per serving.
    The bones cooked down to so soft that I was able to grind them into paste with my blender and eat the paste.
    I have plenty of BBQ-flavored broth left for cooking ground meat to make several servings of soup.

    Sounds great!

  26. Luigi Zanasi
    How about using home-made wine vinegar instead of apple cider? This vinegar was started by my grandfather in Montreal some time before 1920, when he had a barrel of wine go bad. We have been adding wine (mostly home-made from grapes) to it since then.
    Reply: #77
  27. Kerry Merritt Team Diet Doctor

    How about using home-made wine vinegar instead of apple cider? This vinegar was started by my grandfather in Montreal some time before 1920, when he had a barrel of wine go bad. We have been adding wine (mostly home-made from grapes) to it since then.

    It should be fine! I would try to verify the carb count if possible.

  28. Domenica
    Hello,
    Would be possible to use chicken bones instead of beef or lamb?
    If yes, should I follow the same steps? I was wondering if I need to roast them or should I cook them directly in the slow cooker. Thanks!
    Reply: #79
  29. Crystal Pullen Team Diet Doctor

    Hello,
    Would be possible to use chicken bones instead of beef or lamb?
    If yes, should I follow the same steps? I was wondering if I need to roast them or should I cook them directly in the slow cooker. Thanks!

    Chicken feet and wing tips make excellent bone broth. You may choose to roast them for additional depth of flavor, but it is not necessary.

  30. 1 comment removed
  31. Monica
    My personal notes when making this broth:

    The changes I make is that I don't brown the bones in the oven but in the same pot on the stove, or the CrockPotPressureCooker. It doesn't take 1,5 hrs that way, also you don't dirty another pot. You have to turn the bones now and again and it will take 30 minutes for everything to brown nicely if you pay a little attention to it.
    * You heat your pot on high and brush the bones with oil. Brown them evenly on all sides. Taking the heat down as soon as you suspect that the juices in the bottom will start burning.

    * When everything is nice and brown on all sides and your heat has been turned down, I throw in ACV, watch it bubble and hiss and slightly caramelize, do same with Tamari, while throwing in your juniper berries, pepper corns, salt, bay leaves, paprika powder.
    * Then cover with water, leaving a few inches at the top of the pot. Keep adding water during cooking time when you slow cook! 18 to 24 hours total.

    * Last 1,5 to 2 hours, throw in roughly cut Carrot Onion Leek Celery. and fresh herbs if you want (parsley or coriander, or rosemary). Parsley is incredibly healthy. Use the whole bunch! You can also add a bulb of Garlic and/or a piece of fresh ginger, if you want to vary your flavors from time to time! Garlic and ginger obviously incredibly healthy. Seaweed is also a good idea.

    * After that first strain it, then sieve it, to get the last bits of bone grit out!
    * Then taste and add a whole pot of anchovies (very salty), then taste again and ad more salt to taste. I also add a bit of monk fruit powder to add a touch of sweetness and balance any bitterness you might find in the flavor. Then cook again for an hour to dissolve the anchovies. Stirring now and again.

    * Put it in plastic containers with the lid open or loosely fitted to cool down (faster cooling this way instead of letting the whole pot cool down first). Then in fridge to chill, then in freezer. I make 5 liters at a time.

    DRINK A CUP EVERY DAY.
    * Make sure you slightly warm your whole container to dissolve the hardened fat first. Then stir rigorously to distribute the fat evenly through the whole container. Then pour yourself a cup. This way you won't have just a cup of fat the first time and only broth the next time you drink it.

    * I usually defrost one container at the time. It contains two to three portions.
    * Use the broth also as base for any soup you feel like making.

  32. Monica
    Buy fresh bones, I find that if you use already cooked bones, a lot of the fat has already gone. (You've eaten it). I drink bone broth for the nutrients for sure, but it also helps you to hit your fat target of 70% of your energy source intake per day. Especially when you do Keto, a lot of people struggle upping the fat portion of their meals. Bullet Proof Coffee, Keto Hot chocolate and Bone Broth are helping you get there. All to prevent you from getting hungry of course. If you are getting hungry on a Keto meal plan it means you are not getting enough calories, consider adding a cup of bone broth to your daily meal plan!

    Sources of fresh bones:
    Butcher Counters in some Super Markets
    Regular butcher/Poultry shops
    Slaughter facilities (see if there is a butcher that slaughters and hangs their own carcasses).
    Live stock farms. (Live stock farms in your area might slaughter an animal once in a while for their own use. You might be able to opt in on a carcass for some cheap prime meat and some bones) Shin bones with or without the meat attached is excellent. Rib bones also very good. Beef, Lamb and Goat, Venison, Boar, and all kinds of Poultry. You can buy Chicken carcasses for $1 a piece at a local butcher or chicken processing plant. Try humanely and ethically raised and naturally fed animals if you can. And the closer to the source the cheaper you will find it.
    On line meat packages! There are some awesome organic meat suppliers on line that can get you anything grass fed.

  33. Antonia
    You mention 3 cooking methods but don't say wich one is the healthiest (undependently of cooking time and convenience)and maybe using less ectricity. There are a lot of parameters to be taken into account and I think this would make a very interresting article for a lot of people.
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