Spicy low-carb pumpkin bread

You asked for it, and we delivered! Here’s a dairy free and low-carb bread that’s loaded with so much flavor, it might just jump off the table. It’s nutty and moist – and is perfect for breakfast, lunch or just a snack.
You asked for it, and we delivered! Here’s a dairy free and low-carb bread that’s loaded with so much flavor, it might just jump off the table. It’s nutty and moist – and is perfect for breakfast, lunch or just a snack.
USMetric
22 servingservings

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons 2 tablespoons pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 tablespoon 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons 2 tablespoons ground psyllium husk powder
  • 8 tablespoons 120 ml flaxseed
  • 1¼ cups 300 ml almond flour
  • 1¼ cups 300 ml coconut flour
  • 513 tablespoons 80 ml chopped walnuts
  • 513 tablespoons 80 ml pumpkin seeds and extra for topping
  • 3 3 eggeggs
  • 8 tablespoons 120 ml unsweetened apple sauce
  • 4 tablespoons 60 ml coconut oil
  • 14 oz. 400 g pumpkin puree
  • 1 tablespoon 1 tablespoon butter or coconut oil, for greasing the pan

Instructions

Instructions are for 22 servings. Please modify as needed.

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C) and grease a bread pan, 7-8 inches (about 10 x 18 cm), with butter or oil.
  2. Mix together all dry ingredients in a bowl.
  3. Stir together egg, apple sauce, pumpkin puree and oil in a bowl and mix into a smooth batter with the dry ingredients.
  4. Pour into the baking dish and sprinkle a tablespoon of pumpkin seeds on top.
  5. Bake on lower rack for an hour. When a toothpick is inserted into the center and comes out clean, the bread is done.
  6. Let cool on a cooling rack.

Tip!

The bread is best freshly baked or toasted. Slice the part of the bread you won’t have the same day and keep in the refrigerator for 2-3 days. It will keep in the freezer up to a month.

20 Comments

  1. Teresa
    Hey, great recipe! We don't have pumpkin puree in a can in Germany, and in any case I always make my own from scratch; therefore how many ml is normally a can of pumpkin puree? Thank you!
    Reply: #2
  2. Kristin Berglund Team Diet Doctor

    Hey, great recipe! We don't have pumpkin puree in a can in Germany, and in any case I always make my own from scratch; therefore how many ml is normally a can of pumpkin puree? Thank you!

    Hi Teresa!

    The can we used had 425 g in it. You can make your own puree by roasting a pumpkin in the oven and pureeing it when it's baked.

    Good luck!

  3. Gentiann
    In America, "spicy" means "hot spices"referring to a food that has hot peppers in it. For a food that is not hot but have spices in it , the word "spiced" is used. For this recipe, "Spiced Low Carb Pumpkin Bread" would be more appropriate.
    Thanks for the recipe, it looks delicious!
  4. Tom
    Tried the recipe as listed and it was extremely dry, thicker than cookie dough. Added 1 cup of water to it and still was so dry we had to make cookies out of it. A huge flop. Are the quantities correct in this recipe?
    Reply: #19
  5. Cindy
    should that be ground flax rather than whole? thanks
  6. Cindy
    I reported my own comment by accident!
  7. Nina Holland
    ?... 1¼ cups almond flour 》3 dl almond flour...?
    ?... 1¼ cups coconut flour 》3 dl coconut flour...?
    Could the Diet Doctor recipe team revisit the US cup to metric conversions on this and other recipes' DRY ingredients please?
    If I weigh 1¼ cups of almond flour, it weighs about 130g.
    If I weigh 1¼ cups coconut flour it weighs about 150g.
    (not actually sure why ml or dl are used for measuring dry ingredients? !)
    So by converting to metric measurements, I am being instructed to use approx double the amount of dry ingredients that the US cup measurements use, yet the wet ingredients remain consistent.
    I think my fellow UK cooks might be having the same problem, reading some of the comments about a very stiff and unsuccessful "batter"...
    These are not inexepensive ingredients, and I'd want to make sure that quantities are correct before baking, as this looks delicious! Thanks
    Reply: #8
  8. Peter Biörck Team Diet Doctor
    Hi Nina!

    I'm not sure if I understand exactly what you mean but 1 1/4 american cup should be 3 deciliter (dl).

    ?... 1¼ cups almond flour 》3 dl almond flour...?
    ?... 1¼ cups coconut flour 》3 dl coconut flour...?
    Could the Diet Doctor recipe team revisit the US cup to metric conversions on this and other recipes' DRY ingredients please?
    If I weigh 1¼ cups of almond flour, it weighs about 130g.
    If I weigh 1¼ cups coconut flour it weighs about 150g.
    (not actually sure why ml or dl are used for measuring dry ingredients? !)
    So by converting to metric measurements, I am being instructed to use approx double the amount of dry ingredients that the US cup measurements use, yet the wet ingredients remain consistent.
    I think my fellow UK cooks might be having the same problem, reading some of the comments about a very stiff and unsuccessful "batter"...
    These are not inexepensive ingredients, and I'd want to make sure that quantities are correct before baking, as this looks delicious! Thanks

  9. Nina Holland
    Thanks for your reply!

    Hmm. I guess I could summarise again like this:
    My cup measure, if full with almond flour (to a 240ml line), only actually *weighs* approx 110ml (or 1.1dl) which is less than half the weight your conversion from cup to metric suggests.

    I don't deny that 1 cup of LIQUID, does indeed convert as 3dl, but I think your dry ingredient conversions are off.

    A quick google search with some other cup converters confirms this, saying that a cup of ground almonds, for example, weighs in at 115g.

    http://www.goodtoknow.co.uk/recipes/531168/cups-to-grams-converter

    I do think this is why some of the comments on this and other recipes report differing success rates - it all depends on whether one has used the cup or the metric version of the recipe.

    So which is correct?!

    Reply: #10
  10. Nina Holland
    correction: "I don't deny that *1¼* cup of LIQUID, does indeed convert as 3dl
  11. Peter Biörck Team Diet Doctor
    Hi Nina!

    I must be missing something here? :)

    "dl" (100 ml) and "cup" (240 ml) are both volume based measurements. Weight is not involved that conversion?

    Reply: #12
  12. Nina Holland
    Peter, hi again!

    OK - so maybe weight is the issue. (isn't it always?!)

    Converting recipes to metric, for most cooks in the UK at least, usually means we want conversion to *weight* measurements (rather than volume).
    I wouldn't know how to measure a decilitre in volume of anything, or have any vessel with which to do it! (I would imagine it is very inaccurate, especially as dry ingredients differ greatly in the space they fill depending on how compact or dense they are, and what food they are.)

    I use a weighing scales and when weighing 100g of anything, if I change the setting, it's equal to 100ml (=1dl) according to that.

    So what WEIGHT almonds and coconut flour etc, would you recommend I use for this recipe, then?

    We'll get there! :)

  13. Peter Biörck Team Diet Doctor
    Hi Nina!

    I have asked the recipe team why we don't use weight, until we get an answer, my best guess is that it got to complicated to use both weight and volume and they prioritized to use volume.

    As long as we don't use weight in our recipes I really would recommend to get something that measure in ml otherwise it will get tricky as you already stated. :)

    Reply: #14
  14. Nina Holland
    Yes indeed Peter...
    This is where I think a lot of us have been going wrong!
    I have a lot of metric recipes printed out from this site and have been substituting ml for mg in the dry ingredients, so no wonder some have been hit and miss!
    I have a loaf in the oven as I type (having used my humble, single cup measure), so fingers crossed... :)
    Thanks very much for all the replies.
  15. Colleen
    I have to agree with Nina. I wish recipes would be given in weight, i.e. grams/ounces if dry and ml/ounces if liquid.
    I know most of us in US are metric adverse but it is so much easier and more accurate.
    I tried this recipe and the description to "pour" into pan let me know I was in for trouble. So I added additional 1/2 cup applesauce and one egg, still too stiff, more like play dough. then thought maybe the can of pumpkin should have been double the size I used
    (15 OZ).
    Although flavor was not bad, not spicy as another person mentioned but it was too dense and dry.
    For me breads, cookies, cakes are the most missed foods in my low carb diet. the low carb-bread is the exception, it is great. I wonder if your cooks/chefs could build on it and offer some sweet options.
    Thanks for everything, I love all the information Diet Doctor provides.
  16. Jen
    So the recipe has already been altered slightly from the one I printed off to make, but it is a thick and heavy brick. It probably needs 2-4 times the amount of pumpkin spice and 3-4 times the applesauce or other source of moisture--bananas, butter, more applesauce? The texture was exactly like playdoh, as someone mentioned above. It might also help if the eggs where whipped in a machine, but usually you use butter and sugar for that part of the recipe. Will not be making this one again.
  17. Linda
    This is not a good recipe. The ingredients measurements make the batter very thick, there's not enough liquid. The recipe calls for a "can" of pumpkin puree, is that a 15 oz. can, 29 oz. can, I used a large can and the batter was still very dry. This recipe also makes a huge amount of dry batter. I added more applesauce and that didn't help. I wasted a lot of expensive ingredients on this one. I've been very happy with most of the recipes on this site but this one leaves a lot to be desired.
  18. Lew
    I made this recipe this past weekend. It came out exactly as some others have described. The dough is like clay (very thick and dry) the "bread" is HEAVY, dense, thick, and a little dry. That being said, it is not UNLIKE so many other "healthy" breads I have made in the past. They all turn out to be a little too dense for my taste but they satisfy the need (I suppose). I used mine with the Smoked Salmon Sandwich recipe and it was digestible. I am not one to waste food (or money from expensive products) So I guess I will have to find additional uses for the remainder of this "brick". My one suggestion, try to toast it before you eat it. It is a little more tolerable that way. Also, cut THIN slices as it is so thick that if your slices are normal sized it may be too much for you. (just my thoughts. Hope this helps someone else).
  19. Nev
    The same thing happened to me!

    Tried the recipe as listed and it was extremely dry, thicker than cookie dough. Added 1 cup of water to it and still was so dry we had to make cookies out of it. A huge flop. Are the quantities correct in this recipe?

  20. Fiona
    Total flop for me too. Very disappointing as the ingredients are expensive and it sounded so promising. DD team please review this recipe.

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