Low-carb rutabaga fritters with avocado

Low-carb rutabaga fritters with avocado

You can end — or start off — your day right with these crispy and delectable low-carb fritters. They’re loaded with savory and scrumptious flavors. Who doesn’t love dinner for breakfast—or vice versa?

Low-carb rutabaga fritters with avocado

You can end — or start off — your day right with these crispy and delectable low-carb fritters. They’re loaded with savory and scrumptious flavors. Who doesn’t love dinner for breakfast—or vice versa?
USMetric
4 servingservings

Ingredients

Rutabaga fritters
  • 1 lb 450 g rutabaga
  • 8 oz. 225 g halloumi cheese
  • 4 4 eggeggs
  • 3 tbsp 3 tbsp (20 g) coconut flour
  • 1 pinch 1 pinch turmeric
  • 1 tsp 1 tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp ¼ tsp pepper
  • 4 oz. 110 g butter, for frying
Ranch mayonnaise
For serving
  • 4 4 avocadoavocados
  • 5 oz. 150 g leafy greens

Instructions

Instructions are for 4 servings. Please modify as needed.

  1. Preheat oven to 250°F (120°C).
  2. Rinse and peel the rutabaga. Grate coarsely with a grater or in a food processor. Shred the cheese the same way.
  3. Mix the rutabaga, cheese, eggs, coconut flour, turmeric, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Let sit to absorb flour for 3-5 minutes.
  4. Heat butter in a large frying pan over medium-high heat, until melted.
  5. Form the batter into 12 patties.
  6. Working in batches, fry for 3-5 minutes, or until golden brown. Flip, and cook for an additional 3-5 minutes.
  7. Reserve cooked patties to warm oven. Repeat until all the batter is gone.
  8. Serve cooked fritters with a green salad, sliced avocado and a dollop of ranch-flavored mayonnaise.

Tip!

Have fun with this recipe! These fritters are amazing as they are, but there are also lots of ways to “guild the lily.” Add fresh or dried herbs to the batter. Spice them up with chili flakes. Switch up the cheese to play with different depths of flavor. Or double the umami with a touch of tamari. They’re your delicious blank canvas!

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19 comments

  1. Kat
    I like the sound of this recipe and intend to try it out soon.

    I also appreciate that you have a global readership and are making great attempts at simplifying measurements to suit the US and metric markets.

    I'm from the UK so I prefer to switch to metric weights (grams).

    But I'm struggling with dl for liquid quantities. In this recipe, we're required to find 2 2/5 dl mayonnaise. I've discovered that dl stands for decilitre. I've never seen it in a British recipe. And I can't easily envisage this amount. Mayonnaise would typically be measured in tablespoons.

    Is 'dl' the usual measurement for liquids throughout the metric cooking world? It wouldn't be surprising to discover that the UK is the only country to use grams for weight, litres for large quantities, and teaspoons and tablespoons for small quantities. If so, I'll just have to suck it up.

    (P.S. I quite understand that a Swedish website uses the Swedish/US term 'rutabaga' for the vegetable that we call 'swede' in this country :))

    Reply: #4
  2. Alex
    I had this problem too. 1dl is 100ml so 2 2/5dl is 240ml. Hope that helps. Also when you cook them, watch them like a hawk because the butter makes them go from delicious, crispy brown to horrible, burned black very quickly! I had mine with avocado and some finely chopped butter-fried mushrooms. Darn tasty!
  3. Joan mears
    Thanks Kat, Im also from uk and didn't have a clue what rutabaga was. Thanks for tip Alex
  4. clacina
    actually the whole of Africa also uses grams,liters and teaspoons. tablespoons, just the US is still stuck with the Imperial system.
  5. Rhonda
    The whole toggle to remove recipes from menu thing doesn't work. kind of disappointing.
  6. 1 comment removed
  7. Vanessa
    do I put raw halloumi? should I chop it before?
    Reply: #9
  8. LESLIE
    wow - these are excellent. Good with sour cream and bacon versus the mayo recommended.
  9. LESLIE
    no - grate it.
  10. Betsey
    Halloumi cheese is expensive around here! $9.99 for 8 oz. Any suggestions for substitutes or places to buy it cheaper?
    Reply: #11
  11. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor
    You can try Queso Fresco or Queso Blanco if you have access to a Mexican market.
  12. Lori
    Why do we preheat the oven if we're cooking in a skillet?
    Reply: #13
  13. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor

    Why do we preheat the oven if we're cooking in a skillet?

    Step 7 calls for putting the patties in a warm oven to keep them warm while you finish making the rest of the batch.

  14. ROSA MARIA
    HOLA ME HE SENTIDO BIEN CON LA DIETA CETO, PERO EN MI CASO EN EL LUGAR DONDE VIVO TENGO DIFICULTADES PARA ENCONTRAR ALGUNOS PRODUCTOS, POR EJEMPLO PUEDO SUSTITUIR LA RUTABAGA O COLMILLO POR EL NABO?
    Reply: #17
  15. Nicola
    I'm from UK too and am more than happy to use cups as a measure for both dry and wet ingredients!
  16. Emma
    These are awesome! Diet life is awesome 👏. Soooo good with a plate of salad
  17. Dee Bitters
    Try Turnip
  18. roseanne
    what is ratabaga? here in south africa, we do not know it - is there an alternative?. I will google it
    Reply: #19
  19. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor

    what is ratabaga? here in south africa, we do not know it - is there an alternative?. I will google it

    A rutabaga is also known as a swede in some locations.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rutabaga

  20. Eva
    Rutabaga would be "Kålrabi" or "Kålroe" in Danish:-) I never heard about Rutabaga in Swedish either. Anyway - about the dl issue - an American cup is 2,5 deciliter . A deciliter is 100 millilitres - one liter is 10 deciliters or a 1000 mililitres. Simple!:-) I find it really interesting how the brits are using the metric system, but don't use a system for fluids that matches? How do you guys measure fluids then? (PS: Please stay in EU, guys - us Danes need you here!)

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