Lemon-lime poppy seed cheesecakes

Lemon-lime poppy seed cheesecakes

Celebrating something special? Then let these pretty, creamy low-carb beauties grace your table! No crust required. Just the fresh taste of lemon and lime and a creamy topping will complete your no-holds-barred cheesecake experience.

Lemon-lime poppy seed cheesecakes

Celebrating something special? Then let these pretty, creamy low-carb beauties grace your table! No crust required. Just the fresh taste of lemon and lime and a creamy topping will complete your no-holds-barred cheesecake experience.
USMetric
4 servingservings

Ingredients

  • 10 oz. 275 g cream cheese
  • ½ cup 125 ml crème fraîche or sour cream
  • 2 2 eggeggs
  • 2 tbsp 2 tbsp (25 g) erythritol
  • ½ tsp ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • ½ ½ lemon, grated zest and juice
  • ½ ½ lime, grated zest and juicelimes, grated zest and juice
  • 2 tsp 2 tsp (6 g) poppy seeds
Topping
  • 13 cup 75 ml crème fraîche or sour cream
  • ¼ tsp ¼ tsp vanilla extract
  • ½ tbsp ½ tbsp (5 g) erythritol, preferably powdered
  • 13 cup 75 ml fresh raspberries (optional)
  • ½ tbsp ½ tbsp (5 g) poppy seeds

Instructions

Instructions are for 4 servings. Please modify as needed.

  1. Preheat the oven to 300°F (150°C)
  2. Add all the ingredients (except toppings) to a bowl and mix with a hand mixer until smooth and fluffy.
  3. Pour the mixture into glass jars or other small, heat-resistant portion molds.
  4. Bake in the oven for 25 minutes. Shake gently to see if they have stabilized.
  5. Let them cool. Put them in the refrigerator for a few hours until they are completely cold.
  6. Mix the crème fraîche with vanilla and sweetener. Add a spoonful of the mixture on top of each mini cheesecake. Garnish with raspberries, poppy seeds and a sprig of fresh mint.

Tip!

You can prepare this dessert a day ahead. Garnish with berries, poppy seeds and mint just before serving.

Make it even creamier!

After you fill the jars, put them in a deep baking dish. Fill the dish with water so the water covers at least half the jars' height, and then put in the oven. The extra-creamy results are definitely worth the little extra trouble!

Video

Lemon-lime poppy seed cheesecakes

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14 comments

  1. Alison
    what is erythritol?
    Reply: #11
  2. 1 comment removed
  3. Lila
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erythritol (Google is your friend....)
  4. Maggie
    It is a sweetener like Stevia
  5. Gün
    How much Stevia (liquid or powdered) could I use to replace the erythritol and get the same level of sweetness? I’m planning for a dinner party in the French countryside where I can’t find any low-carb sweetener but stevia... Thanks!
    Reply: #13
  6. Jan Merrett
    Can i leave the erythritol out maybe use honey
    Replies: #8, #9, #12
  7. Jessika Roy-Desruisseaux
    Can we freeze this recipe ?
  8. Jill Wallentin Team Diet Doctor
    Hi Jessika,
    Yes you can freeze it up to 3 month.
    Reply: #14
  9. Jill Wallentin Team Diet Doctor
    Hi Jan,
    Sure you can. But it will not be low carb if you use honey since it has the same effect on blood sugar as regular sugar.
  10. Karen Glatz
    Have you tried this sous vide? No messing with a big oven or a bain marie. Also, cooking time is not so touchy since it is at the proper temp and no more. I see other sous vide cheesecakes that cook at 168 degrees for 90 - 120 minutes.

    I've made very easy custard with no tempering, no bain marie and no exacting times at 168 degrees and 60 - 90 minutes. Perfect every time and quick as a wink to get it going.

    Also, sous vide in a small frankencooler (a small ice chest with a hole cut in the top for the sous vide wand to slide through) doesn't heat up the house in the summer like an oven does and uses much less energy (and coolers tend to go on sale in the Fall).

    Reply: #15
  11. Una
    It's similar to Xylitol, which is what I use - or Stevia I should think, which I've never used but is also good. I don't have arrays of sweeteners here, just the one as they do the same thing for the little you need. My health shop in the north of England doesn't sell erythritol. I've been using Xylitol for absolute years long before this low carb thing, so as to cut out sugar in cooking for myself and be able to offer one menu to all my many friends who come for various meals and cater for the odd diabetic or those counting calories, so that we can all eat the same stuff.

    I am looking forward to offering them a pudding like this the next time!

  12. Una
    Honey is just plain sugar, Jan, and not at all the same thing. You only have to look at the carbs in sugar compared to sweeteners. It would pay to keep a bag of Xylitol in the cupboard, as Patrick Halford promotes and has done for donkey's years, and pass on the honey however good quality it may be. This pudding as it stands is already 7g and that only leaves 13g for those on 20g of starchy carbs a day, so informed choices are needed to save grammes of carbs if you want to - which I do. Honey would bring that level up considerably.

    Can i leave the erythritol out maybe use honey

  13. Una
    Stevia would do but the powdered stuff would be best as the recipe gives the amount in grammes, not in liquid form, and they're not interchangeable as far as quantity goes.

    How much Stevia (liquid or powdered) could I use to replace the erythritol and get the same level of sweetness? I’m planning for a dinner party in the French countryside where I can’t find any low-carb sweetener but stevia... Thanks!

  14. Una
    Don't think mine would be there in three months' time in a freezer! I would just make two at a time and eat them fresh to avoid the freezing for three months making them deteriorate. So much one freezes that is cooked actually deteriorates, and much of our cream in Britain says not to freeze anyhow as it will change consistency, not because it goes off. And remember this pudding as it stands is 7g carbs so it's not as low as some of the big whole meals on here that fill you up. Easy to plough three of these at a time if you're not careful. Ha, ha!

    Hi Jessika,
    Yes you can freeze it up to 3 month.

  15. Una
    A bit too complicated, Karen, for us in Britain - ha, ha! Really don't want to go out and buy expensive contraptions or these jars to make this pudding! No idea what a 'sous vide' is, sorry. I'm sure it's useful where you live and energy saving, but I personally want this cooking and diet and way of eating to be as easy as possible and as quick as possible as I have so much else to do in life apart from Keto-gazing and cooking and shopping - ha, ha! What is 168 degrees? Celsius, Fahrenheit - and then nearly two hours to cook, and two minutes to eat? Far too complicated for my busy lifestyle in England. But each to their own, and wish you well. So nice of you to post and help others. It's all about sharing. I'll stick exactly to how it's done here and with the exact ingredients except for Xylitol as a sweetener as I already have it as a stock cupboard item for the past 14 years!

    Have you tried this sous vide? No messing with a big oven or a bain marie. Also, cooking time is not so touchy since it is at the proper temp and no more. I see other sous vide cheesecakes that cook at 168 degrees for 90 - 120 minutes.
    I've made very easy custard with no tempering, no bain marie and no exacting times at 168 degrees and 60 - 90 minutes. Perfect every time and quick as a wink to get it going.
    Also, sous vide in a small frankencooler (a small ice chest with a hole cut in the top for the sous vide wand to slide through) doesn't heat up the house in the summer like an oven does and uses much less energy (and coolers tend to go on sale in the Fall).

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