Duck confit with roasted rutabaga and balsamic sauce

Duck confit with roasted rutabaga and balsamic sauce

Making your own amazing New Year's Eve dinner this year? You should! This festive duck confit is super luxurious but surprisingly easy to prepare. Perfect with oven-roasted rutabaga and balsamic sauce. Ring in the new year in a higher state of low-carb deliciousness!

Duck confit with roasted rutabaga and balsamic sauce

Making your own amazing New Year's Eve dinner this year? You should! This festive duck confit is super luxurious but surprisingly easy to prepare. Perfect with oven-roasted rutabaga and balsamic sauce. Ring in the new year in a higher state of low-carb deliciousness!
USMetric
4 servingservings

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp 1 tbsp sea salt
  • 1 tbsp 1 tbsp dried sage or dried rosemary
  • 2 tbsp 2 tbsp dried parsley
  • 10 10 allspice berries
  • 5 5 peppercorn, whitepeppercorns, white
  • 1 1 bay leafbay leaves
  • 1 1 yellow onionyellow onions
  • 2 2 garlic clovegarlic cloves
  • 4 4 duck legduck legs
  • 2¼ lbs 1 kg butter or ghee or duck fat
  • 1½ lbs 650 g rutabaga
Balsamic sauce
  • 1 tbsp 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tbsp 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tbsp 1 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1 cup 225 ml heavy whipping cream or sour cream

Instructions

Instructions are for 4 servings. Please modify as needed.

  1. In a mortar, crush the spices together with the sea salt. Wipe the duck with kitchen paper and pat dry, then rub the spice mixture over the duck. Let sit for a while at room temperature.
  2. Fry the duck legs in plenty of butter or ghee for a few minutes. You can even skip this step if you want but it adds an extra nice flavor and color.
  3. Put the duck and the gravy in the slow cooker. Add finely chopped onion and garlic, then pour over the butter, ghee or duck fat so the meat is completely covered. Cover and cook on low for 6 hours.
  4. Strain the cooking juices, set aside the onion, and pour into a glass jar. Cool quickly so the fat solidifies and the broth separates. Remove the fat with a spoon and save the broth for the sauce. Keep the fat in a jar, so you can use it for cooking later.
  5. Peel and slice the rutabaga into half-inch (1 cm) pieces. Brush with oil, salt and pepper. Bake in the oven (365°F/185°C) for 20 minutes or until they get soft.
  6. Bring the broth to a simmer, stir in vinegar, mustard and tomato paste. Add sour cream or heavy cream. Salt and pepper to taste, add some more vinegar if needed.

Tip!

If you do not have access to a slow cooker, you can also use a cast-iron pot or prepare the dish on the stove on medium-low heat. It takes 2-3 hours, depending on the duck legs' size. If you have an ovenproof pan, you can cook in the oven on 250°F/125°C after step 2.

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7 comments

  1. Una
    You must be joking! 1kg of butter for four people. That is nearly £10 in money before you buy the duck and all the rest! And is it really necessary to use 1kg for small duck legs? Sounds very excessive to the point it sounds like another mistake in your recipes!
    Reply: #2
  2. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor
    The butter/ghee is for frying. In step 2, it says this is optional.
  3. Susie
    Actually one needs all that fat for the confiting of the duck. However, it is reusable. And it doesn’t have to be butter!
  4. G
    I would suggest DD redo the nutrition facts. The total calories for one serving is more than many people eat in a whole day! I believe it is because you counted all the cooking fat. Assume that you remove .75 kg (or more) of fat for other use and then recalculate with .25 kg of cooking fat. (If a lot of fat cooks out of the duck legs, would you be able to remove even more fat?) Add info explaining that this is a way to make a deliciously flavored, savory fat for cooking or topping eggs, meat, vegies.

    Do you have a rough estimate of the weight of the duck legs? That would be helpful so we could substitute chicken thighs which are much easier to find and less expensive, though not as flavorful as duck.

  5. Dayn
    Also, suddenly you’re talking about gravy... which gravy? Where did it come from? Have I missed anything?
    Reply: #6
  6. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor

    Also, suddenly you’re talking about gravy... which gravy? Where did it come from? Have I missed anything?

    The gravy here is the pan juices from frying the duck.

  7. bassem.sabagh
    Really is a poor recipe.. i am a huge fan but this one is like a different breed!

    I quote "Keep the fat in a jar, so you can use it for cooking later"

    You cannot calculate macros bases on input ingredients when you actively advise on removing the solid fat to use later. Hence the grossly wrong fat content.

    What about the onions that were set aside? Should they be used somewhere? Discarded? If so please advise!

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