Keto curry chicken with coconut and lime

Oh, my. Imagine a silky coconut sauce filled with fragrant lemongrass, warming ginger, and a kick of heat from the curry. Oh, yes. It’s real, and it’s happening.
Oh, my. Imagine a silky coconut sauce filled with fragrant lemongrass, warming ginger, and a kick of heat from the curry. Oh, yes. It’s real, and it’s happening.

Ingredients

4 servingservings
USMetric
  • 2 2 stalks of lemon grass
  • 2 tablespoons 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 1 tablespoon 1 tablespoon curry powder
  • 113 lbs 600 g chicken thighs, boneless
  • 1 1 leekleeks
  • 1 1 thumb-sized piece of fresh ginger
  • 2 2 garlic clovegarlic cloves
  • 1 1 red bell pepper, slicedred bell peppers, sliced
  • ½ ½ red chili pepper, finely choppedred chili peppers, finely chopped
  • 14 oz. 400 g coconut cream

Instructions

Instructions are for 4 servings. Please modify as needed.

  1. Crush the rough part of the lemongrass with the broad side of a knife or a pestle.
  2. Cut the chicken into coarse pieces.
  3. Gently heat the coconut oil in a wok or a large frying pan.
  4. Grate the ginger and fry together with the lemongrass and curry.
  5. Add half of the chicken and sauté over medium heat until the strips are golden. Salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Set aside and fry the rest of the chicken in the same way, perhaps add a little more curry for the second batch. The lemon grass can remain in the pan.
  7. Now it's time to slice leaks into pieces and sauté them in the same pan together with the other vegetables and finely chopped garlic. The vegetables should turn golden, but retain their crispiness.
  8. Add the coconut cream and chicken and let simmer for 5–10 minutes until everything is warm.

Tip!

Did you know you can store ginger in the freezer? Just wash it really well, dry it, and you can grate it still frozen with the clean skin on!

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28 Comments

Top Comment

  1. Eddie Mitchell
    Here we go again. Don't breath the air, it will kill ya. Don't drink the water, it will kill ya. Don't use a plastic spoon, it will kill ya. Give me a break. The recipes and food ideas on this blog are way above the crap most people are eating.

    For gods sake, give the place a break.

    No grovel intended.

    Kind regards Eddie

    Reply: #8
    Read more →

All Comments

  1. Vevcil
    How frying effects nutritions?
  2. DonnaE
    I second Vevcil's question about frying. Stewing is safer--prevents the creation of carcinogenic heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons:
    http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/causes-prevention/risk/diet/cooked...
    Reply: #10
  3. Eddie Mitchell
    Here we go again. Don't breath the air, it will kill ya. Don't drink the water, it will kill ya. Don't use a plastic spoon, it will kill ya. Give me a break. The recipes and food ideas on this blog are way above the crap most people are eating.

    For gods sake, give the place a break.

    No grovel intended.

    Kind regards Eddie

    Reply: #8
  4. greensleeves
    Chicken thigh fillet? What's wrong with the meat, on the bone, with the skin? Stewing the bone & skin will give us more collagen, cartilage & healthy fat in a rich curry- plus the skin has important glycine for our hair & nails. Are we supposed to eat skinless chicken now? Confuzzled.
  5. Murray
    I didn't see in the recipe that the skin is removed. The picture shows them with skin on.

    As for the bones, it makes a more pleasant meal for the diner for the cook to remove the bone. The meat also cooks more evenly in the pan. One can freeze the bones for another chicken dish later or to make stock. To make an excellent jus/sauce, break the bones open with a cleaver, roast them a bit in the oven and then sauté them in chicken stock, reducing to an excellent jus/sauce.

    As for frying, it's deep frying that is the main culprit or pan frying at high heat. This recipe says gentle heat and fry only until golden. This is not a recipe that starts with pour in oil and heat until the oil smokes then sear the meat.

  6. FrankG
    Presumably this is a direct translation into English, so please don't take every word literally. Apply some common-sense and imagination. As with any recipe, treat it as a guideline rather than gospel.

    The picture does show skin and bones (also the richer dark-meat), so by all means "cut" into pieces using a cleaver and cook with both skin and bones; as this will likely add to the flavour and nutritional value (maybe there is a relationship between these?) but it is up to you :-)

    Once again, a meal which flies in the face of those who claim LCHF must be hard to sustain as it is so restrictive and boring Hah! :-P Many thanks for sharing it with us.

  7. FrankG
    By the way, that looks like a top-quality knife! Was it always that size, or is that the result of many years of good use and many, many resharpenings?

    Yes I like to cook... I think it sad that: apparently there are now generations who apparently lack this basic skill. I'm glad to report that my son shares my passion in this regard :-)

    I'm immediately starting to wonder about substitutes in this recipe... for a start, how about using goat instead of chicken?

  8. Kaye Bonato
    Thanks Eddie, I was about to start tearing out my hair and you saved me just in time.

    For those concerned about frying food/meat. If you don't like it, don't do it. As for me, a nice piece of chicken with skin and bones lightly fried is a thing to enjoy.

  9. Lily
    I cooked this curry today in a pressure cooker for 35 minutes, the best curry we ever had. Thank you fore the recipe.
    PS. I left the skin and bones on, they were delicious.
  10. BobM
    If it's true that "frying" foods to create a sear is bad, why aren't the French dying at an incredible rate? It's hard to find French food/meat that's not seared.
  11. Jo tB
    In English "frying" means deep frying like chips. If you heat a little oil in a pan to brown meat it is called sauté (searing). I agree with FrankG, the original recipe is in Swedish, and quite often when trying to translate it into English you look up the swedish word in the dictionary and you have several options in English to chose from. Perhaps you chose the wrong English word. I have had that happen to me when trying to translate a Dutch word into English. You have to look at the context in which the word is used.

    To fry gives three Dutch translations: bakken, braden, fruiten. Which one to chose in this case??

  12. Nancy
    Could the recipes be posted in such a way we could copy and paste, for example, to Evernote? I think the graph and the photo of our cook keep me from doing this.
    This is very good and I'm trying to save it the lazy, I mean, digital way. Thank you.
    And also thank you to Eddie Mitchell.
  13. Jo tB
    Nancy, I just copy and paste any recipe I want into a Word document. I use the paste special function so as not to import all the internet codes, it becomes flat text. I use "the scissors" in windows 2010 to cut and paste the photo into the word document. Then I save it to my hard drive or put it onto a USB stick along with over 500 other recipes that I have collected. Now all I have to do is make them.......
  14. Bel
    Is there a carb count for this recipe?
    Reply: #15
  15. Zepp
    Yes, look at the piechart to the right.

    Its says 13 grams/serving.. and moderate Low carb.

  16. Ronnie
    I love the recipes you posted a lot! How about making them accessible on Pinterest? It would give you lots of exposure and I would have a quick way of saving it.

    Best Wishes!

  17. Lorna
    Only just come across this site and loving these recipes. Don't understand all the critical comments though.
    I'm English and have spoken English all my life ;-) To fry means to fry, such as in a frying pan ... a very shallow vessel - perfectly designed for FRYING the good ol' full English breakfast (which isn't deep fried like chips :O ). Deep frying, as per chips, is ... deep frying in a large saucepan ir deep fryer. Saute ... that's not English, it's French :-D
  18. Cate
    I agree with Lorna - what is with the critical comments? Just use your common sense and adapt to your preferences (skin, no skin, bones, no bones, fry, stew), no need to debate the issue. We cooked this recently, as directed, and it was delicious.
  19. Jenny
    This was absolutely delicious! Thank you! I had to YouTube how to prepare lemon grass and that was really helpful. I made puréed cauliflower. My husband and ten year old daughter loved it - thank you for this great recipe!
    Reply: #20
  20. Bjarte Bakke Team Diet Doctor
    Glad you enjoyed it Jenny! We have loads more simple and delicious recipes coming up very soon. :)
  21. MonaLisa
    I am thinking ..coconut cream, is that really coconut milk? The tin can? or is it the little paper carton that actually is named coconut cream? Or the coconut cream that should be mixed with water? I have three variations.. but never seen coconut cream in a tin.If I look at the picture it is coconut milk, from a tin. Right?
    Reply: #22
  22. Peter Biörck Team Diet Doctor

    I am thinking ..coconut cream, is that really coconut milk? The tin can? or is it the little paper carton that actually is named coconut cream? Or the coconut cream that should be mixed with water? I have three variations.. but never seen coconut cream in a tin.If I look at the picture it is coconut milk, from a tin. Right?

    Sorry for late answer, yes it's from a tin. :)

  23. cydne
    my first fear was a rise in cholesterol. but most of the fat in these recipes comes from non animal sources! which of course means no cholesterol. high fiber foods also help lower cholesterol.
    thank you thank you thank you for helping me find a way to eat all the delicious foods I love and loose weight and be healthy!
  24. Lisa
    Does anyone proof what they write these days?
    1.) The title of the recipe is Curry Chicken with Coconut and Lime. There is NO LIME listed anywhere in the ingredients or the instructions.
    2.) The list of ingredients includes 1 thumb-sized piece of fresh ginger. Yet nowhere in the Instructions is the ginger ever mentioned. When is it added? How is it prepared (diced, sliced, grated)?
    3.) Step 8 says to sprinkle with lemon zest, but that ingredient is never listed.
  25. Carol
    I made this recipe the other night and we really enjoyed it. Great flavors! As far as the lime goes, I used some of the zest for garnish and squeezed the lime juice right in. It was delicious, thank you!
  26. Corey
    How big is a serving size
  27. Gloria
    I have the same question as Lisa (24). Where does the lime come in? I would guess that lime juice would be added at the end with the coconut cream. ???
    Reply: #28
  28. Val
    I may be wrong but I would guess that they had meant to add kaffir lime leaves, perhaps with the coconut cream to simmer...at least that's how I make Thai coconut lime dishes. If you have them, try it. :)

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