Low-carb deep dish pan pizza

Low-carb deep dish pan pizza

Deep dish pan pizza is the ultimate comfort food. Our low-carb version brings all the feels - a thick yeast-bread crust that rises around the toppings, a rich tomato sauce flavored with Italian seasonings, pepperoni, bell pepper, onion, and sausage. All topped with a thick layer of warm, gooey melted mozzarella that makes you want to talk with your mouth full.

Low-carb deep dish pan pizza

Deep dish pan pizza is the ultimate comfort food. Our low-carb version brings all the feels - a thick yeast-bread crust that rises around the toppings, a rich tomato sauce flavored with Italian seasonings, pepperoni, bell pepper, onion, and sausage. All topped with a thick layer of warm, gooey melted mozzarella that makes you want to talk with your mouth full.
USMetric
8 servingservings

Ingredients

Crust
  • ½ tsp ½ tsp granulated sugar
  • 1½ tsp 1½ tsp active dry yeast
  • 1 tbsp 1 tbsp hot water
  • 1 cup (4 oz.) 240 ml (110 g) almond flour
  • ¼ cup (¾ oz.) 60 ml (25 g) whey protein isolate (unflavored)
  • 4 tbsp 4 tbsp baking powder
  • 3 cups (12 oz.) 700 ml (325 g) shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 1 cup (8 oz.) 240 ml (230 g) cream cheese, softened
  • 4 4 large egglarge eggs
  • 1 tsp 1 tsp olive oil, plus more for hands
Toppings
  • 3 oz. 85 g tomato paste
  • 1 tsp 1 tsp Italian seasoning
  • 6 oz. 170 g fresh italian sausage, cooked and crumbled
  • 2 oz. 55 g sliced pepperoni
  • 1½ oz. 45 g sliced green bell peppersliced green bell peppers
  • 1 oz. 28 g sliced white onionsliced white onions
  • 8 oz. (2 cups) 230 g (475 ml) shredded mozzarella cheese
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Instructions

Instructions are for 8 servings. Please modify as needed.

    Crust
  1. In a small bowl, mix together the sugar, yeast, and hot water. Set aside, uncovered, to activate the yeast.
  2. In a medium-sized bowl, whisk together the almond flour, whey protein isolate, and baking powder. Set aside.
  3. In a large saucepan over medium-low heat, stir together and melt, the mozzarella and cream cheese. Remove from heat. Add the melted cheese mixture to the almond flour mixture, and stir to combine. Add the eggs and yeast mixture. Using a wooden spoon or your hands, mix the dough until smooth. Cover the dough, and set aside in a warm place to rise for 30 to 35 minutes. The dough will be very wet.
  4. Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C). Coat a 14" (35 cm), non-stick, deep-dish pizza pan with the olive oil.
  5. Pour the dough into the prepared pan. Coat your hands with olive oil and smooth the dough to the edges and at least 1/2" (1 cm) up the sides of the pan. The dough should not be more than ¼" (0.5 cm) thick across the bottom of the pan. Keep your hands covered in oil to prevent the dough from sticking to your hands.
  6. Toppings
  7. Dollop small spoonfuls of tomato paste onto the crust, and spread gently over the dough. Sprinkle the Italian seasoning evenly over the tomato paste. Top with the sausage, pepperoni, bell peppers, onions, and mozzarella cheese.
  8. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes on the middle rack, or until the top, is bubbly and browned. Remove from oven and let sit for at least 10 minutes before serving.
  9. Refrigerate leftovers for up to 5 days or freeze the baked pizza slices wrapped in freezer paper for up to 3 months.

Tips!

You might want to sauté the onions and bell peppers in butter before using them as toppings, but you don’t have to.

Notes about pans

For this recipe, using different pans will yield different results. This recipe provides instructions for using a 14" (35 cm) deep dish pizza pan.

You can use a 10" (25 cm) by 15" (38 cm) baking dish, cast-iron skillet, or a combination of smaller deep dish pizza pans such as two 9” pans. To determine which size pan to use, consider how thick you want the crust to be

Dark coated metal pans work best. Glass or ceramic pans do not conduct heat as well. If you use glass or ceramic, then you will need to extend the cooking time.

Should you use tomato paste or tomato sauce?

This recipe uses a thin layer of tomato paste instead of tomato sauce or pizza sauce.

Tomato paste is thicker and has far less moisture which allows the crust to bake more evenly. Using tomato sauce can make the crust soggy unless you prebake the crust for 10-12 minutes before adding toppings.

Using the best baking powder

Yes, 4 tbsp of baking powder is the correct measurement. The yeast and the baking powder are what cause the crust to rise like a true deep dish pizza.

Be sure to use baking powder that is aluminum-free. If your baking powder has aluminum in it, the crust will have an undesirable metallic taste.

Also, check the baking powder for sodium. Some brands have more than 60 mg of sodium per serving, which yields a salty crust. Ideally, look for brands with 50 to 60 mg of sodium per serving.

Should I really use sugar in this recipe?

Yes! The small amount of sugar is needed to activate the yeast. A small packet from a coffee shop is really all you need

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💬 Have you tried this recipe?

What did you think? Please share your thoughts in the comment section below!

24 comments

  1. rmillerkroouze
    I made this and it turned out great. FYI, 4 servings fit perfectly in a 9" cake pan. Also, I added the veggies raw- next time I will definitely saute a bit before, since they were still crunchy after baking. Finally, the crust browned before the filling was cooked through- next time, I will start with some tin foil around the edges for the first 10 mins or so of baking. All in all- hit the spot!
    Reply: #2
  2. Crystal Pullen Team Diet Doctor

    I made this and it turned out great. FYI, 4 servings fit perfectly in a 9" cake pan. Also, I added the veggies raw- next time I will definitely saute a bit before, since they were still crunchy after baking. Finally, the crust browned before the filling was cooked through- next time, I will start with some tin foil around the edges for the first 10 mins or so of baking. All in all- hit the spot!

    Great tips!! Thank you for sharing your insights!

  3. Serena
    Just wondering if there are any alternatives to the whey protein isolate, or if it can be left out of the recipe? I'm struggling to find it in my area, and any I do find is flavoured. Something about strawberry flavoured pizza crust is turning my stomach...!
  4. Shari
    Reply: #9
  5. Donna
    This pizza looks amazing! Can't wait to try it! But, the recipe says 8 servings...so that means one piece is a meal? Possibly with a salad to go with it?
    Reply: #6
  6. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor

    This pizza looks amazing! Can't wait to try it! But, the recipe says 8 servings...so that means one piece is a meal? Possibly with a salad to go with it?

    If you cut it into 8 slices then yes, 1 slice is a serving. This is rich and surprisingly filling. Please keep in mind that adding a salad adds additional carbohydrates.

  7. Una
    Can you please give us a more practical solution for us in Britain rather than always American, to that whey protein isolate. It is not available on that Amazon link anyhow. I find often there is one ingredient either that is difficult to get or so expensive for what is needed. Also I wonder what the purpose is of adding granulated sugar to a recipe? I know it's very small? I don't buy sugar in any form as I never ever use it. Is that to make the, heat rise, or something?
    Reply: #8
  8. Charlotte Zwart Team Diet Doctor

    Can you please give us a more practical solution for us in Britain rather than always American, to that whey protein isolate. It is not available on that Amazon link anyhow. I find often there is one ingredient either that is difficult to get or so expensive for what is needed. Also I wonder what the purpose is of adding granulated sugar to a recipe? I know it's very small? I don't buy sugar in any form as I never ever use it. Is that to make the, heat rise, or something?

    The sugar is to activate the yeast. The yeast eats the sugar so it’s consumed. As for whey protein isolate, you might try egg white protein powder. Also, the original recipe used oat fiber, so you might try potato fiber since you are in the U.K.

  9. Serena
    thanks Shari, but that doesn't ship to Ireland unfortunately! I did check a few online stores but it was the same issue with it either being flavoured or unavailable.
    Reply: #10
  10. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor

    thanks Shari, but that doesn't ship to Ireland unfortunately! I did check a few online stores but it was the same issue with it either being flavoured or unavailable.

    You could try an egg white protein powder, oat fiber or potato fiber. Being in Ireland, potato fiber may be the most easy to obtain.

    Reply: #11
  11. Chalkie
    Thank you Kristin, your comments are very helpful. I live in Australia and to purchase whey protein isolate for the odd recipe is very expensive, however oat fibre is available relatively cheaply. I also wonder if green banana flour would do as its high fibre flour and prebiotic, although not sure of carb count yet. I will try with both and leave a comment.
    Reply: #14
  12. Victoria
    Can I substitute collagen powder for whey protein isolate?
    Reply: #13
  13. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor

    Can I substitute collagen powder for whey protein isolate?

    We have not tried using collagen in this recipe, but it behaves pretty differently in baked goods and may not work well.

  14. Cassieoz
    I'm Aussie too and oat fiber is hard to find other than online (and THAT makes it expensive). WPI (unflavoured) is in most health food stores and yes, it's expensive, but my pack lasts me a long time
  15. slatteryj1
    I am looking forward to making this tomorrow! I always have difficulty mixing doughs that have cheese in the recipe... I am wondering if using a paddle mixer or hook would work?
    Reply: #16
  16. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor

    I am looking forward to making this tomorrow! I always have difficulty mixing doughs that have cheese in the recipe... I am wondering if using a paddle mixer or hook would work?

    Using something strong like that may risk overmixing which may make the cheese proteins too tough. I usually have the best luck kneading it with my hands.

  17. Clarisse
    Hello. Is it possible to replace the granulated sugar by xylitol or erythritol? Or maybe just not use it for this recipe?
    Reply: #18
  18. Charlotte Zwart Team Diet Doctor

    Hello. Is it possible to replace the granulated sugar by xylitol or erythritol? Or maybe just not use it for this recipe?

    The sugar is needed to activate the yeast.

  19. wplogin-917b1b1a-7e14-4470-89e8-4c4cb4df0a2c
    Not sure if I went wrong somewhere or what. Does it truly develop a bread texture because mine was still pretty mushy even after extra cooking. Tasted okay but with how long it took to make for what I ended up with I wouldn’t make it again.
    Reply: #20
  20. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor

    Not sure if I went wrong somewhere or what. Does it truly develop a bread texture because mine was still pretty mushy even after extra cooking. Tasted okay but with how long it took to make for what I ended up with I wouldn’t make it again.

    This dough should not have had a mushy texture. If it did, the most common culprit is if you used tomato sauce instead of tomato paste. If you did use tomato paste, it may have needed to be baked longer.

    Reply: #21
  21. Crusty
    It was made with tomato paste. It was cooked an additional 10 minutes as well. Crust had the texture of scrambled eggs
    Reply: #22
  22. Crystal Pullen Team Diet Doctor

    It was made with tomato paste. It was cooked an additional 10 minutes as well. Crust had the texture of scrambled eggs

    This recipe, one of my family's favorites, relies heavily on patience and technique. Be sure you're giving the dough sufficient time at each step. It may be the step of mixing the dough well with your hands that is causing the issue. It does need to be mixed well to avoid those lumps. Also, the pan makes a big difference. If at all possible use a pan with holes in the bottom that you've lined with a bit of parchment. It allows for more heat directly on the crust.

  23. DEBORAH
    For those that do not want to buy/use sugar, you can use inline (not insulin....inulin, which is a probiotic). Another option is to grab a packet or two of sugar at you next visit to a restaurant of fast food place. In the US, sugar packets, along with sugar substitutes, are usually available on the table or where the coffee is served. I drink my coffee black but help myself to a packet or two to use for things like this.....saves buying the stuff for such a small amount.
  24. Grace
    I thought this was nice enough but compared to fat head pizza it just wasn't worth the effort.
    As I was making it it never reached a "dough" consistency so I thought it wasn't going to work out but in the end it did. I ended up getting two standard cake tin size pizzas out of it which was plenty and yes it was rich so two slices per person was plenty. I followed the recipe to a tee and cooked my meat and veggies off so it didn't make the dough soggy but it still wasn't as crispy as I would have liked. The outside was ok but the inside of the crust was quite spongy. All in all a nice recipe. It's nice to try something new but I think I'll stick to fathead pizza x

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