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Is Gary Taubes Vindicated?

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Gary Taubes, one of the true pioneers of LCHF and best-selling author of Good Calories, Bad Calories, was publically ridiculed in 2002 for writing that obesity isn’t about a caloric imbalance, and that fat is not dangerous.

Fourteen years later, Taubes is still somewhat of a heretic. However, slowly but surely, at least some of his ideas are entering the mainstream. Has Taubes even become vindicated? Here’s a new and interesting article on the topic by the man himself, about his experiences:

The Vindicated: ‘Nutrition Heretic’ Gary Taubes on the Long Road Back From a Big, Fat Public Shaming

To insist that obesity is caused by consuming too many calories is as inane as it would be to say that poverty, for instance, is caused by earning too little money. It confuses a description with an explanation and is [a] profoundly inexcusable error.

– Gary Taubes

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Obesity – Solving the Two-Compartment Problem

Calories in, calories out – it's not that simple

One of the major mistakes made by the Calories In/ Calories Out (CICO) hypothesis is the presumption that energy is stored in the body as a single compartment. They consider that all foods can be reduced to their caloric equivalent and then stored in a single compartment in the body (Calories In). The body then uses this energy for basal metabolism and exercise (Calories Out).

This model looks something like this:

1compartmentmodelAll energy is stored in that one compartment. However, this model is a known to be a complete fabrication. It does not exist except in the fevered imaginations of CICO zealots. Food energy is not stored in a single compartment, but two compartments (glycogen and body fat).

According to this incorrect model, simply reducing calories going in, or increasing the amount going out, reduces the amount of body energy stored as fat. Of course, this Eat Less, Move More (or Caloric Reduction as Primary) strategy has a known success rate of about 1% or a failure rate of roughly 99%. After all, we’ve all tried it. It just doesn’t work. Study after study proves the futility of this advice, based on a flawed understanding of physiology. This does not deter any of the medical or nutritional authorities to question the sagacity of their advice, though.

To better understand how energy is stored in the body, it is more accurate to use a two-compartment model. Continue Reading →

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What Causes Obesity?


4.8 out of 5 stars5 stars88%4 stars5%3 stars3%2 stars1%1 star1%88 ratings5,612 viewsWhat is the real cause of obesity? What causes weight gain?

It surely is not excess calories – that’s just a description of how people gain weight. It does not explain why, so it’s not helpful. Dr. Fung gets into the REAL cause in this presentation.

This talk has only been available for our members before (check out our free trial), but now everyone can watch it above.

Table of contents

  2:10  Why are there fat doctors?
  4:10  What causes weight gain?
10:15  The ultimate cause of obesity – the unspoken accusation
16:09  The biology of human starvation
18:55  Metabolic rate and calorie reduction
21:45  Not lack of willpower
24:05  The cruel hoax
26:00  Hormonal obesity
28:40  Insulin and weight gain
37:05  A new hope

Transcript

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Here’s what our members have said about the presentation (besides giving it a 4.8 / 5 rating). Continue Reading →

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Diabesity: Why Diabetes and Obesity Stem From the Same Problem

Smiling fat man stretching on the floor.

The term diabesity is the unification of the words ‘diabetes’, referring to type 2, and ‘obesity’. It is a wonderful word because it is at once able to convey that they are truly one and the same disease. It is incredibly descriptive and evocative in the same way as the word ‘fugly’.

Strange as it may now sound, physicians did not always recognize this seemingly obvious and basic connection between type 2 diabetes and obesity.

Let’s go back in time to the year 1990. Grunge was taking over the music scene. Fanny packs were growing in popularity (gasp!) and not the sole domain of the middle-aged dad tourist. The mid 20’s actors of the hit TV show Beverly Hills 90210, pretending to be high school students, were totally fly, not just sad replicas of cool. Continue Reading →

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China on Its Way to Top the World in Childhood Obesity

big obese asian fay boy

If the current trend doesn’t change, China will be the country with the greatest number of overweight and obese children in the world by 2025:

South China Morning Post: China on Track to Top the World in Childhood Obesity

With China’s great economic leap comes great downsides, such as a 24-hour availability of highly-processed junk food and advertising of it to children.

The solution? The opposite – eating way fewer carbs and staying away from processed junk. This would of course be very much simpler in a less toxic food environment, and with better advice.

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The Shame of Fat Shaming

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It’s easy to get fat in America – more than a third of adults are obese – but it’s not easy to be fat.

Unfortunately there’s a lot of fat shaming going on, something that is shameful:

The New York Times: The Shame of Fat Shaming

It’s sad that people receive ineffective advice to lose weight (“eat less, move more”), the environment works against them all the way, and when they fail, people blame them and shame them, making it ever more unlikely that they’ll ever succeed.

It’s a disgrace, and we need to change it. We have to help people more effectively (when they ask for it and want it), and we need to stop fat shaming. It’s simply as bad as racism or sexism – and it’s certainly not helping people.

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Fat v Carbs on BBC

What happens if you do the exact opposite of what the current dietary guidelines say and what your average physician tells you, and go on a low-carb and high fat diet? That’s what Jamie Owen wanted to figure out in the short BBC documentary “Fat v Carbs” that aired yesterday.

He had quite some success – losing weight and lowering his cholesterol (to the amazement of his not-so-updated family doctor). High-fat enthusiasts Dr. Zoe Harcombe, Dr. Aseem Malhotra and Sam Feltham are all interviewed.

If you’re in the UK you can watch it on BBC. Or watch it on YouTube above.

Fat v carbs – it seems like we have a clear winner. Or what do you say? Continue Reading →

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How to Change the Way a Country Eats


4.5 out of 5 stars5 stars65%4 stars20%3 stars12%2 stars0%1 star2%49 ratings1,183 viewsHow do you change the way a country eats? On a total budget of only $6,000? That’s the question Jayne Bullen answered at the recent Low Carb USA conference.

Bullen is a manager at the Noakes Foundation, working closely with Professor Tim Noakes. She talks about how the foundation is making a huge impact in South Africa, a country facing an immense diabesity epidemic. All this without massive budgets or funding through commercial channels.

It’s a great talk – one of the most inspiring of the conference – about people doing incredible work that is desperately needed.

Watch it

Watch a segment of the presentation above (transcript). You can watch this 21-minute talk on our member pages, including captions and transcript:

How to Change the Way a Country Eats – Jayne Bullen

Start your free membership trial to watch it instantly – as well as over 160 video courses, movies, interviews and other presentations. Plus Q&A with experts, etc.

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Vegan Vs. LCHF Cardiology Battle

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Is a low-fat vegan or an LCHF diet better for lowering the risks of diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease? If you want to hear the arguments for both sides, you can watch this video with Dr. Aseem Malhotra and the vegan-inclined Dr. Joel Kahn.

Skip to 1:48 unless you want to learn more about penile arteries:

Mind Body Green: Two Cardiologists Debate Fat, Sugar, And Coconut Oil

The common ground between the two debaters and cardiologists is that sugar is bad for you and lifestyle (movement, stress reduction, not smoking) is important in decreasing risk factors. When it comes to fat they predictably disagreed.

According to Dr. Naiman – from whom I’ve stolen the header to this post – there was a clear winner to the debate. What do you think?

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How to Change the Way A Country Eats

Dr. Salih Solomon_ presentation_San Diego4.1 out of 5 stars5 stars53%4 stars7%3 stars34%2 stars3%1 star0%26 ratings2613:07


How can we turn the epidemics of obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes around in a country? Dr. Salih Solomon is a researcher at The Noakes Foundation in South Africa, and talks about this in his presentation from the Low Carb USA presentation.

South Africa is known as a country where LCHF diets (often called “Banting” there) have become very popular in recent years. But it is also a country facing huge problems with obesity and diabetes, not least in the less wealthy segments of the population.

So what interventions exactly are necessary to turn this problem around? That’s what this talk is about.

Watch it

Watch the full presentation on our member pages, including captions and transcript:

How to Change the Way A Country Eats – Dr. Salih Solomon

Start your free membership trial to watch it instantly – as well as over 150 video courses, movies, other presentations, interviews, Q&A with experts, etc.

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