How to shop for low-carb or keto extras online

How to shop for low-carb or keto extras online

A well formulated low-carb or keto diet should ideally be based on minimally processed foods like meat, fish, eggs, cheese, vegetables, butter and other natural fats.1 Any of these items are usually easy to find in a normal grocery store.

However, perhaps you don’t have convenient access to a decent grocery store. Or perhaps you simply prefer to shop online from home, to save time. Or perhaps there is some special low-carb food product that you have a hard time finding in your store.

If so, this page is for you. Get inspired with these low-carb ingredients and snacks available from online retailers.

Even if your local market is basic and limited, these delicious, low-carb favorites are all just a click away. Links are to Amazon unless otherwise noted.

(These links are provided solely for your inspiration and convenience. Diet Doctor does not benefit from your purchases.)2

Content

Oils

Extra virgin olive oil is great, and you can shake things up by buying some delicious infused versions online. If you want to branch out, avocado oil is a perfect choice. Or macadamia oil, almond oil, or walnut oil. In fact, you can find almost any oil on Amazon.

If you want a milder olive oil for making homemade mayonnaise, try this one.

Nuts

macadamia nuts on ceramic bowl

Do you go nuts for nuts? In addition to providing flavor and crunch, these keto favorites may offer some health benefits.3

You can find a wide variety of nuts online. Macadamia nuts, pecans, and Brazil nuts  are the lowest in carbs, followed by hazelnuts (filberts) and walnuts. Buy them raw or dry roasted. And don’t forget about pine nuts — an especially yummy topping when sautéed in butter.

Check out our guide to see how different nuts stack up. (Hint: cashews are quite high in carbs.)

Coconut

Coconut oil.

Most markets have coconut oil, but does yours also stock coconut milk and coconut cream? You can find these delicious, versatile foods online.

For more fun with coconut, check out:

Snacks

Pork rinds

Looking for convenience?  Check out these shelf-stable, nutritious keto-friendly options:

For more convenient snacking ideas, check out our guide to keto snacks.

Low-carb flours and seeds

blanched almond flour

When baking one of our delicious low-carb breads, these flours are your go-to ingredients:

For low-carb crackers, breads, and other recipes, you might need the following:

Specialty sauces

Country Ribs and Barbecue Sauce

How about a delicious pizza sauce? (3 grams of net carbs per quarter cup, so go easy.) A yummy pesto? Some tasty tapenade or tempting tahini?

And doesn’t everyone need some tangy low-carb barbecue sauce? (No artificial sweeteners but 3 grams of carbs per tablespoon, so use in moderation.) For no-carb barbecue flavor, try this all-natural rub.

Animal fats

pork lard in a cast iron pan

Low carb means higher fat. Vary your fats (and thus, your flavors) with lard, tallow, or duck fat. Then try ghee — it doesn’t burn like butter, so it’s perfect for sautéing. Plus, it keeps well in a desk drawer and is delicious in your tea or coffee.

Or purchase a delicious variety of animal fats, including schmaltz (that’s chicken fat), lamb tallow, and even — wait for it — wild boar lard at Fatworks.

Specialty meats

Beef broth with herbs

Do you yearn for hard-to-find old-school classics like bone broth, pemmican, liverwurst, and organ meats from pastured animals? They all ship, frozen, from US Wellness Meats.

Dark chocolate

A small square of dark chocolate can be the perfect finish to any low-carb dinner — rich, satisfying, and healthy.5 Keep it really dark but still delicious with:

A couple of more liberal favorites:

Specialty teas

Spice up your beverage routine with some new teas:

For herbal favorites, you can try:

Don’t forget to try them iced, too.

 

About

This Diet Doctor guide was written by Jenni Calihan, who created the non-profit, Eat the Butter, to start a mother-to-mother conversation about diet and health. She advocates for real-food-more-fat eating, and has been feeding her family (four kids) for twenty years.

Did you enjoy this guide?

We hope so. We want to take this opportunity to mention that Diet Doctor takes no money from ads, industry or product sales. Our revenues come solely from members who want to support our purpose of empowering people everywhere to dramatically improve their health.

Will you consider joining us as a member as we pursue our mission to make low carb simple?

Practical guides

 

Visual guides

More

A low-carb diet for beginners
Low-carb foods

 

  1. Many animal foods high in saturated fat are low in carbs, satisfying, and tasty. Although still considered controversial among experts, several large reviews of clinical trials have found no evidence that eating foods high in saturated fat increases the risk of heart disease, early death, or other health problems:

    British Medical Journal 2016: Re-evaluation of the traditional diet-heart hypothesis: analysis of recovered data from Minnesota Coronary Experiment (1968-73) [systematic review of randomized trials; strong evidence]

    Nutrition Journal 2017: The effect of replacing saturated fat with mostly n-6 polyunsaturated fat on coronary heart disease; a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials [strong evidence]

    Learn more: A user guide to saturated fat

  2. We do not show ads, use any affiliate links, sell products or take money from industry. Instead we’re funded by the people, via our optional membership. Learn more

  3. Nuts may help reduce certain heart disease risk factors:

    Nutrients 2017: Nuts and human health outcomes: a systematic review [strong evidence]

  4. Meat is an excellent protein source that has been unfairly criticized for increasing the risk of heart disease, cancer, and other diseases, based on very weak scientific evidence:
    Guide to red meat: is it healthy?

  5. Some studies suggest dark chocolate might be beneficial for heart and gut health:

    Journal of Nutrition 2016: Cocoa flavanol intake and biomarkers for cardiometabolic health: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials [strong evidence]

    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2011: Prebiotic evaluation of cocoa-derived flavanols in healthy humans by using a randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover intervention study [moderate evidence]