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“Your Best Carbohydrate Level Is the One You’re Happiest on Without Weight Gain”

Before and after

Before and after

I just got an email from Mary in Canada about how she found out where her optimal carb level is on an LCHF diet. How she finally managed to lose and maintain her weight – and reverse type 2 diabetes. Here’s her story:

The Email

Hi there Andreas & Sincere greetings from Nova Scotia, Canada!

I am a 46.5 year-old Mom of four beautiful teenagers, a wife of a wonderful man and and one happy woman! :))  Now that the youngest is almost 14, over the past couple of years, I began in earnest to “be true” to myself and thus, “be true” to a way of eating that is a low carb/moderate protein/high fat approach. Ask anyone who knows me and they will tell you that I should be a promoter for the Atkins program – LOL!, because I am very enthusiastic about what it has done for myself and others and I totally believe in it for so many reasons beyond just weight loss, for it is what reversed my Type II diabetes and a host of other ailments that accompany diabetes!

Over the past 10 years (and maybe a little more), however, I would go “off and on” the program, unfortunately. I think I thought many times, that I should be able to move past the 20 gram induction level of carbohydrate (and if I was not so metabolically messed up, I probably could have) and still lose weight (my weight was coming off at a snail-pace). When it didn’t, I would then abandon the ship entirely, rather than just climb back up the ship ladder and perhaps move back down to 20 grams or less. It is sad that I would give up on myself time and time again, but put it this way; if I would have completely drowned myself in carbohydrates for the last 10 years – in other words, gave up on the Atkins program completely – and not attempted to crawl up that ladder again, I would have been much, much bigger than even in that “Before” picture, not to mention at probably a more advanced level of Type II by now!  :)

An “Ah-ha” moment of discovery came for me about 4 years ago, which changed “how” I did the Atkins program!  I began to think, that if the “carb ladder” was such a temptation or derailment for me and/or I could not lose on say, 30 grams/per day even (I was very metabolically resistant to weight loss at this point because of the the diabetes) – “Why go up the ladder at all?” I then started quickly leafing through some old Atkins books and an actual pamphlet that I had, whereupon the wonderful Dr. Atkins, validated this himself in a statement, and I wanted to share it with you and your readers, as it is such an empowering statement from him, I feel!  Here it is:

It comes from, Atkins Complete Personal Diet Manual, a pamphlet with his signature on the cover and quoting from Page 11: “Some people actually feel better on 25–30 grams of carbohydrate a day. My fundamental message is: (and this is underlined by HIM also): Your best carbohydrate level is the one you’re happiest on without weight gain.”

For me, considering that I DID ALWAYS feel better on either low to no carbs and diabetic symptoms went away IMMEDIATELY everytime I went on Atkins and stayed under 20 grams, and considering that I would not gain weight at 20 grams, but would on 30 or halt on 30 grams, I felt like this sentence from Dr. Atkins was just the very best, empowering statement for whenever I did try to “do the program” and move up the carbohydrate ladder, I quickly failed.

I may or may not have continued to fail, but the one thing I know for sure is that by not increasing my carbs, I began to succeed!  I often wondered why weight loss was stalling for me at say, 30 grams, but then I did not need to worry about this aspect again by keeping my carbs at 20 grams (for the most part).  In this way, my own “Ah-ha” moment combined with Dr. Atkins very own words, were truly my gateway to freedom! I have lost 40 lbs (18 kg).

Like others, I have had many people say I was doing something dangerous over the years by following the Atkins approach or at the very least, gently questioning the issue of saturated fat within the program’s guidelines.  Probably, the best thing I did was to stop promoting the program and let the results speak for themselves! :)  I still continue to give links for others who ask me for information but I do not engage with questioning looks if I skip a meal when they are hungry…because in my world, with healthy, stable blood sugars, hunger is a state that I rarely ever experience!

I have freedom now and I thank you so, so much for the AMAZING work you are doing, Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt! You are a blessing to so many, for the expertise you have on this subject and your excellent website! And positive, gentle approach!  PS… Jimmy & Christine Moore know my story & I think you know them! :))

Big hugs!
Mary Fultz

Update

Update: Now 70 Pounds Lost!

Comment

Congratulations Mary!

More

LCHF for Beginners

How to Lose Weight

Diabetes – How to Normalize Your Blood Sugar

“Hello LCHF – Goodbye Type 2 Diabetes”

How to Cure Type 2 Diabetes

Many other health and weight success stories

PS

Do you have a success story you want to share on this blog? Send it (photos appreciated) to andreas@dietdoctor.com, and please let me know if it’s OK to publish your photo and name or if you’d rather remain anonymous.

Low Carb Made Easy How to Lose Weight Low-Carb Recipes Low-Carb Success Stories

40 Comments

Top Comments

  1. Nate
    Thanks for sharing your excellent story, Mary!

    When I read the title, I was hoping that you would talk about Dr. Atkins. As Gary Taubes points out, Dr. Atkins added some valuable knowledge to nutritional science. That knowledge was, as you pointed out, the importance of knowing how many carbs one can eat and still maintain good health and happiness. And, just as important, he provided a method that will help most people with metabolic problems find their magical carb quantity. He deserves (IMO) more credit for providing that knowledge.

    Another point you made was about not responding to negative comments or criticism about your way of eating. I, too, have found that discussing diet can be more emotional than discussing religion or politics. In those situations disagreements can become only more hardened and not more open. Today, I read a comment addressing an article in the New York Times about the Paleo diet. The commenter said some thing like, "Listening to a Paleo eater extol about his way of eating was only a little bit less painful than listening to a vegan."

    However, that does not mean that i don't make an effort to discuss LCHF. After seeing the movie Fed Up, I can no longer sit back and allow the system to destroy the lives of any more honest, hard working/playing kids. Thus, as a diabetic, I've joined the American Diabetes Association, and I plan to promote LCHF as much as possible. Hopefully, I will be able to do that with a "positive, gentle approach."

    Read more →
  2. Mary
    Thank you so much for featuring my story, Dr. A! And thank you so, so much Vicente, for your warm congrats! I love the work of Denise Minger and her unbiased research approach & I give people her name who are really searching for answers to this question. I myself have no qualms eating saturated fat...it is delicious and natural. This website rocks! :)
    Read more →

All Comments

  1. candice
    Hi there,

    I have been LCHF for almost a year now. How do you know when you have "reached" your optimal/right body weight?

    Many thanks

    Candice

    Replies: #2, #6
  2. jim
    Hi Candice!

    To my understanding, your weight loss should stop automatically. You won't lose any more weight, as soon as your body's regulatory mechanisms determine your body fat percentage to be optimal.

    At least if your caloric intake is adequate (which - on LCHF - it should be).

  3. Vicente
    Hi Mary,
    congratulations! And thank you for sharing your story. I find it really interesting to read about diabetics that use LCHF to put their diabetes under control.

    For those questions about saturated fat, reading Denise Minger can be a good answer. It is a pity there is no translation to my native language because everybody should read that article.

  4. Mary
    Thank you so much for featuring my story, Dr. A! And thank you so, so much Vicente, for your warm congrats! I love the work of Denise Minger and her unbiased research approach & I give people her name who are really searching for answers to this question. I myself have no qualms eating saturated fat...it is delicious and natural. This website rocks! :)
  5. billy
    i would share this but no one on my friends? list, for some reason, does not want to read or care about any information i can get on diabetes and sensible ways to help control their sugar. or anything else thanks for sharing
  6. Zepp
    If you are healty and dont have any eating disturbances your apetite get higher when your body reached a point that it dont like to lose more fat!

    And thats probably one reason that it dont like to lose to much fat to fast.. its about a lot of hormones that make sure you dont starving away!

    And I can say one thing for sure.. you dont gonna disapear!

    As a women there is estrogen and others that make you have fat for a pregnancy.. its often imposible to get pregnant whitout the right amount of fat.

    Its altso a reason why women get bigger hips.. its mostly for fertility reasons!

    But if one got fat abdominal.. its for fight and flight.. its more about stress hormones.. and abdominal fat is not that healty.

  7. Nate
    Thanks for sharing your excellent story, Mary!

    When I read the title, I was hoping that you would talk about Dr. Atkins. As Gary Taubes points out, Dr. Atkins added some valuable knowledge to nutritional science. That knowledge was, as you pointed out, the importance of knowing how many carbs one can eat and still maintain good health and happiness. And, just as important, he provided a method that will help most people with metabolic problems find their magical carb quantity. He deserves (IMO) more credit for providing that knowledge.

    Another point you made was about not responding to negative comments or criticism about your way of eating. I, too, have found that discussing diet can be more emotional than discussing religion or politics. In those situations disagreements can become only more hardened and not more open. Today, I read a comment addressing an article in the New York Times about the Paleo diet. The commenter said some thing like, "Listening to a Paleo eater extol about his way of eating was only a little bit less painful than listening to a vegan."

    However, that does not mean that i don't make an effort to discuss LCHF. After seeing the movie Fed Up, I can no longer sit back and allow the system to destroy the lives of any more honest, hard working/playing kids. Thus, as a diabetic, I've joined the American Diabetes Association, and I plan to promote LCHF as much as possible. Hopefully, I will be able to do that with a "positive, gentle approach."

  8. Mary
    Dear Nate, Thank YOU so much for your wonderful compliment! I was truly excited to talk about Dr. Atkins and how his program made this all possible for not only myself but also for so, so many people! Nate, I totally LOL when you said that about discussing diet being on par with politics & religion as far as sensitivity goes! It's really true, isn't it? ((Still laughin' about that)...That's the thing; I have learned that there is a fine balance between what someone wants to hear and what someone needs to hear and if you cross that line...well, you just wouldn't want to! LOL! I do still love talking to people about LC/HF, but I don't feel as much a need to defend my choices anymore. I have always been a believer in whatever works for each person in this life. However, if anyone wanders by and asks, "What do you eat?", I don't mind sharing and directing them to websites & research that can help them along. I think my word choice was a bit off when I look at what I said...I haven't stopped promoting Atkins (I will always be one of his biggest fans), but yes, I have stopped defending it.
  9. Mary
    Hi there Zepp! -You are so right...appetite is totally influenced by hormonal imbalance. Many years ago in Canada, an overweight person would actually be diagnosed as having a hormonal imbalance, which doctors would attribute to their extra weight. This was probably far more accurate than telling them that they just didn't exercise enough. People used to think that this was just "an excuse" for their overweightedness. And Zepp, you're right; mother nature wants me to never disappear! lol! My wish for this life is to be a healthy weight, which I am now.
  10. Murray
    Mary, that is a great find. Thanks for that. With great thinkers, I can always draw more water going back to the same well, gathering nuances I missed earlier.

    Judging from the "before" picture, may I infer you had an epiphany near Banff?

  11. 1 comment removed
  12. jules
    Vicente, here is a translation tool. copy and paste text, or can translate a whole page or website. https://translate.google.com/
    Reply: #13
  13. Vicente
    Hi jules,
    yes, I know about that tootl. But it is not that good. I wish that Denise Minger's article was translated (by a human) to spanish language.

    Hi again, Mary,
    it is sad, but usually only the people that has seen your evolution ask about your excellent weight control. When you met new people, they don't think you found a way to reverse your obesity, or they just don't ask about it. I wish they did, but they usually don't ask. I suppose they think you are lucky and you don't have weight problems.

  14. Eric Anderson
    Do not count carbs!
    Rather; Do not eat them!

    I have aslo found that for me; not eating the carbs works better than trying to count the carbs and creeping up the carb ladder!

    Since carbs are not required and the body does fine on ketones why count or eat carbs?

    Sure some carbs sneak into your diet.
    Egg yolks .3 Egg whites .3 and whole egg .6 grams of carbs
    Cream and some organ meats have small amounts

    How blood sugar and blood insulin responds to food types and amount will vary.
    For me not eating is more effective than counting

    An increase from 20 to30 to 40 or more grams may not add weight BUT each gram will effect the blood sugar and insulin response.

  15. Paul the rat
  16. Lu Ann
    Great stories and advice here. Hello folks, I started the LCHF lifestyle about 10 days ago to lose the extra 10 lbs I have. After the first two days, I had no sugar cravings, which ruled my life. I was a sugar addict and I didn't care! So no more cravings and I'm often not hungry - so I guess that means I'm doing things correctly. Also, I managed to lose 5.1 lbs. I feel free from the sugar and have more mental clarity - it's weird but true.

    I started up at my local gym, take 3 exercise/cardio classes a week and am feeling great. I know this is the place for me but ........ I am not sure this is a lifestyle I can always stay on. By that, I mean I want to have bread occasionally (HATE the Oopsies), or a baked potato with my grilled steak or a Snickers Bar. I am no longer craving these things but I remember how good they are and want them sometimes.

    My question to everyone is ...... once I reach my weight goal, how do I have these things occasionally without my body going into cravings afterwards? Or is that just inevitable, and I'll need to deal with them cold-turkey after?

    I'd love to hear comments from you veteran LCHF veterans so I can continue to feel this great even after my weight loss is complete.

  17. Nan
    Congratulations Mary

    You lift up a point that it would be wise for dieters be aware of, which is that each time we go off a diet, especially if we regain weight, it becomes harder to lose weight again, to stick to a new way of eating. The research is a bit vague, but it seems our brains become ever more reluctant to restrict food, maybe we just get burned out from dieting, our metabolisms slow, genetics--some or all of these.

    I know from experience that it is harder to get back on track as long as one thinks "diet" as in weight-loss diet. IMO, the key is to think about eating lchf for health, with weight loss as the secondary motivation.

    http://www.sugaraholics.com

  18. Kerstin
    LuAnn - I just want to say that while I do enjoy bread, I have discovered over the past 4 years now that I just don't like it as much any more. I do react to gluten, which is why I gave it up; however, I am generally satisfied with a bite...or in the case of my local orchard, sadly their pies just don't taste as good any more.
    I had to travel to Germany recently, and while I did eat bread there, it was simply much easier to do so for 10 days than to explain to my older relatives why I shouldn't - and I used it as a vehicle for an almost obscene amount of butter, as well as cheese and meats (ate the bread there more from a sentimental reason - my legs let me know quickly that they didn't appreciate it by bloating). However, I also was able to lose the water weight again quickly, and actually had no issues with dropping the bread again.
    So I say if you really want to splurge periodically, do so - be careful it doesn't become a regular occurrence, and you'll find with time that your taste for bread will disappear.
    As for potatoes - really load them with sour cream and such when you eat them. Don't feel guilty - but pay attention whether or not your still really like them, or just remember liking them...
  19. Karyn Wyatt
    Thought you might like to see this article from Australia that claims reheating cooked pasta halves the insulin spike. If true, this may be revoutionary.

    The link is here: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29629761

    The article (printed below) on news.com.au is here: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29629761

    GET ready for a life-changing announcement.

    There’s a ridiculously simple trick to making pasta more healthy.

    All you need to do is reheat it.

    This healthy eating revolution doesn’t even require cooking skills.

    It sounds counterintuitive when most diet advice tells us that food has more nutrients if it is fresher.

    But scientists from BBC program Trust Me, I’m a Doctor have discovered that cooking pasta and then cooling it turns it into “resistant starch”, which acts like fibre.

    Your body will experience a smaller glucose peak and — crucially — you will absorb fewer calories.

    The starch becomes resistant to the normal enzymes in our gut that break carbohydrates down and release glucose that cause a blood sugar surge.

    Reheated pasta acts like fibre in the body.

    Scientists had previously believed that reheating the pasta would return it to its previous, non-resistant form, but experiments on the BBC program showed this was not the case.

    Volunteers in Dr Chris van Tulleken and Dr Denise Robertson’s experiment were given freshly cooked pasta, a cold version and a reheated dish, with a simple tomato and garlic sauce.

    They then gave blood samples every 15 minutes for two hours, to see what happened to their blood glucose as the pasta was slowly digested.

    The scientists found that cold pasta led to a smaller spike in blood glucose and insulin than freshly boiled pasta.

    The discovery is set to change the way we diet forever.

    But reheated, it produced an even more dramatic effect, reducing the rise in blood glucose by a massive 50 per cent.

    The scientists now plan to continue the research to see whether adding resistant starch to the diet can improve blood results associated with diabetes.

    Dr Van Tulleken called it a “brand new discovery”, telling the BBC it was a finding that could “simply and easily improve health”.

    He told the BBC: “We can convert a carb-loaded meal into a more healthy fibre-loaded one instead without changing a single ingredient, just the temperature.

    “In other words our leftovers could be healthier for us than the original meal.”

    The discovery could have a huge impact on the regimes we follow to try to lose weight.

    Dieters, rejoice — pasta is back on menu.

    Replies: #20, #21
  20. Paul the rat
    Thank you for the story Karyn,
    but I am guessing that not many regulars on this blog would be interested in pasta even if it would turn to the gold nuggets in their bellies.

    "simply and easly improve health" - I love this

    Reply: #22
  21. erdoke
    Funny that they discover something that is well known science. Just look up the Wikipedia entries on resistant starch (scroll down to RS3) and retrogradation of starch.
  22. Vicente
    Why don't you just express your opinion without attacking other people?
    Reply: #23
  23. Paul the rat
    Where do you see the attack? and on whom?
    Reply: #24
  24. Vicente
    I have no time for stupid conversations. Eveybody, even you, can read your comment. I will not waste more time with you.
    Reply: #25
  25. erdoke
    You might have misunderstood something, Vicente.
    Grains have other health disadvantages than skyrocketing blood sugar which are obviously not removed by cooling and reheating pasta. Even this effect is limited to max. 50 percent reduction of BG spike which can still be high, can't it?
    I believe this is why Paul is confident that many here won't be interested in pasta, reheated or not.
    Btw, I just joined the family for a lunch of spaghetti Bolognese earlier today. It was a true lower carb (and higher fiber) version, let cooled down and I heavily limited the portion size, took it with lots of cheese, etc. Nevertheless, some bloating is already developing. I consider it a funny experiment for the same day I started listening to the (audiobook) sequel of Wheat Belly. :-)
    Reply: #26
  26. Paul the rat
    Thank you erdoke,
    I strongly encourage you all to read this review (I am resending it , I know). It is also a source for some good references

    http://www.nutritionjrnl.com/article/S0899-9007(14)00332-3/pdf

    Reply: #27
  27. Vicente
    I apologize to Paul the rat if that is the case. "Not many regulars on this blog would be interested in pasta even if it would turn to the gold nuggets in their bellies" because wheat is a toxin and you are still getting an unnecessary blood glucose rise. I am sorry, but without the explanation I felt I was being called a zealot.
    Reply: #28
  28. Paul the rat
    No problem Vicente, loose conversations carried out by means of written words are often misunderstood.
    Reply: #29
  29. Vicente
    My fault :(
  30. Mauricio Trambaioli
  31. eugeneK
    In South Africa our favourite accompaniment at a barbecue is a stiff maize(corn) porridge which is high GI - BUT when cooled and the re=heated it is low GI...I have measured my blood sugar several times after two hours of consumig it and have found a minimal increase, so it is on our weekend menu. I will now try the same experiment with pasta and see what the results are. But as previous writers have commented, I think I remember pasta and the sauces more than actually have a craving for it!
  32. Yvie
    Hi guys, perhaps I can get an answer here. I have been studying diets & nutrition for many years
    since I was diagnosed with Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)
    In this syndrome, we 'cysters' naturally have high blood Insulin levels whether we eat high glcaemic foods or not or even fast! Consequently, it seems we can do nothing to reduce the level, what we can only do is chose foods & drinks very carefully so as not to raise the levels even higher !
    So my question is, what to do ?
    The Doctors I have come accross don't have any idea how I can take my own level down to that of a 'normal' person. Only how to manage the level I have. So very frustrating.......
    I have accepted my situation, but I would just like the Insulin level to stay as low as I have managed to keep my HBA1c. Thankyou :-)
    Reply: #33
  33. Zepp
    Some say that PCOs is a woman special symptome of Metabolic syndrome!

    At least its comon that one got several of the other symptomes to.

    Anyway.. fertility doctors strugle whit that.. and heres one that come to a solution.. its LCHF!

    http://www.dietdoctor.com/how-to-eat-to-get-pregnant

    The problem is hyperinsulinemia.. one can go whit that 10-30 years befor it ends up whit sever conditions.. like diabetes.

    There are other causes to, but those are not that comon like cancer in pancreas.

    http://www.dietdoctor.com/?s=PCOs&submit.x=0&submit.y=0

  34. Lu Ann
    Hello! I posted back in October when I first started the LCHF lifestyle. Combined with joining a gym and working out 4 days a week, I lost 16.9 lbs. in 7 weeks. I thought this was too good to be true. Never thought I'd last one week, let alone a few months. I fell off the wagon BIG over Christmas with the sugar. Got back on track. Didn't gain any weight. I can not live on the LCHF lifestyle the rest of my life but I no longer have the cravings and hunger like I used to have. I've added more foods to my eating but I am very careful not to return to my old habits. For example, I have rice or pasta 1-2 week and in small portions. I enjoy it without craving it. Ate a banana the other day, it tasted much sweeter than I remember. For the first time in my life, food does not rule me. Haven't been able to get my overweight son or hubby to come on board - too hard to deprogram them but ... I'm the one who brings food into the house and prepares it so I have cut back on items like rice/pasta/potatoes and make food in less quantity, forcing them away from the table because there's nothing left to eat. Probably will never break them free of bread and potatoes but they will eat them less often and in less quantity. Now if I can just find ways to prepare low-sugar veggies that they will eat.

    This is the first program that ever really had a profound affect on weight loss for me.

    Reply: #36
  35. Mary
    Oh my gosh Lu Ann...what an awesome loss! Super congratulations to you and what a great way that you have found to limit the amount of carbs you & your family consume! You know, I always say "whatever works" for a person and if eating rice or pasta a couple of times per week doesn't reintroduce weight gain and/or cravings, then I say, "fantastic"! There is no room in this program for anyone to be critical of what we eat. It is up to the individual. Unfortunately, there are people who are radical in their beliefs and/or approaches to any way of life and this just shouldn't be the way it is....I am so thrilled for you and I don't even know you. lol! However, I am writing to say thank you for posting onto this old page of mine-haha! I have since dropped body fat/size since that pic. and I just feel really, really grateful, and I'm always so inspired by others like you who are doing this for your health! Take care!
  36. erdoke
    Thanks for the update, Lu Ann!
    You might be able to further trick your family by introducing more fat, fermented foods (yoghurt, pickles, sauerkraut, etc.) to their diet. These have an adverse effect on the insulin response to otherwise highly insulinogenic foods.
  37. Michael
    Congratulations, Mary! You look amazing! Maybe I'm biased, as I live in Nova Scotia too :-) We have so many overweight people in our country that would stand to benefit if they would follow some of the basics listed on this blog. I lost 20 lbs in 2015 without much effort at all and now I'm at my perfect weight. However, for me that's not nearly as important as how much better I feel since eating LCHF. I really notice an improvement in my cognitive function at work and my mood is a lot more positive. Keep up the good work, Mary.
    Reply: #39
  38. Sandi
    Thank you for sharing that, Mary! I have Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and I'm in the middle of a medication change so my weight loss is slowwwww. My husband, who doesn't have an autoimmune thyroid disorder lost 55 lbs in 3 months on LCHF but since September 28, 2015 I'm only down 21 lbs out of about 100 lbs I need to lose. I'm struggling with the thyroid medication changes, Fibromyalgia, Degenerative Disc Disease through my whole spine and almost daily chronic migraines which have me basically housebound and bedridden but I'm not letting it get me down. My doctor is a huge proponent of LCHF as he himself lost 110 lbs in a year changing to THE LCHF lifestyle. He reminds me that I am dealing with hormone levels due to the medication changes and that I'm doing great. I too need to stay quite low carb to see results and I have to remind myself that slow and steady wins the race so again I thank you for sharing that you struggled. It's great to know I'm not the only one that is moving along a bit slower than I'd like.
    Reply: #40
  39. Mary
    Hi there Michael! -I am only seeing this 'just' now. Lol! I apologize for that as I have not been on here for quite some time. -Thank you very much for your wonderful compliment. Your own weight loss of 20 lbs with hardly any effort is phenomenal!! I hope that you are continuing to feel the health benefits and changes that go along with the weight loss! Since writing this, I have lost another 15 lbs. and I am down two more clothing sizes...now fitting into high school waist size. I am 48 and have never felt stronger. It is truly an amazing experience and journey that I am grateful for.
  40. Mary
    Hi there Sandi! I hope that this is some consolation, but I found that when my blood sugars normalized, the weight loss became 'quicker'. I also have fibro and this too, has become far more manageable as I reversed the Type II. ...which makes me wonder if insulin sensitivity is linked to pain/inflammation issues, a likely chicken-egg-which-came-first-story. I sincerely hope your pain level reduces and Sandi, your weight loss is fantastic, especially considering those specific health issues. If while you are resting you could even do some deep breathing to relax your spine, it may help to alleviate the pain by bringing more oxygen to the tissues in your back and body. I do this to reduce pain standing up and it greatly helps me. Take special care on your journey! :))
  41. Selina
    Congratulations Mary! What an achievement!
    I am happy I have came across this story I have been thinking my carbs are too high (type 2 aswell) I'm loosing weight and cm but slowly. I am going to go down 10-20g
    Whats your daily food look like?
    I'm thinking moderate protein, avocados,eggs and healthy fats would keep me under.

    Selina from Australia

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