Higher-satiety eating could become your new favorite lifestyle

Do you want to try a way of eating that leaves you satisfied instead of hungry, includes foods you love to eat, and helps improve your weight and health?

Whether you are new to our site or an experienced low carb eater who is looking to break a stall or try something a little different, we’re excited to bring you a new way to think about food: higher-satiety eating.

It’s important to note that this approach is very compatible with low carb. A lower carb diet tends to be higher in satiety as well.

However, I believe that this new approach has two major benefits compared to a strict low carb diet: it can allow you to eat more flexibly, and get better results.

Tuscan Sheet Pan Chicken with Zucchini and Tomatoes

What is higher-satiety eating?

Higher-satiety foods help you feel as full as possible for the fewest number of calories. You can think of “satiety” as the opposite of hunger, but it’s more than that. It’s the opposite of wanting to eat more.

Many factors influence satiety. Over the last year, using the best available research evidence and clinical experience, we’ve developed a new algorithm that takes into account the protein percentage, energy density, fiber content, and hedonic factors of various foods. All of these factors affect your feelings of satisfaction or hunger.

So now, we’re providing a satiety score for different foods and all our recipes to help you know which ones are higher satiety. Our site scores each food on a scale from 0 to 100; higher scores mean more satiety per calorie. This means that higher scores are more effective for helping you lose excess weight or improve your metabolic health, with no hunger.

Foods that score between 40 and 59 are moderate satiety, while foods above 60 are high satiety. We suggest you get started by aiming for meals that deliver a combined score of around 50 or higher to eat for higher satiety.

Our testing indicates that this 50+ approach (on average) may be enough for many people to be successful. There’s definitely no need to aim for a “perfect” 100 all the time. This is a very flexible approach.


An expansion of our low carb offerings

As the founder and CEO of Diet Doctor, I’ve been driven for the last 20 years to empower people to dramatically improve their health. That means always re-evaluating nutrition and health science, and adjusting and updating our advice to be able to help the greatest number of people possible.

I’ve been on some version of a low carb diet myself for these 20 years. Over the last few years, I’ve gone towards a higher protein and now a higher-satiety version of low carb, following new science. The result? More flexibility, easier eating, and better results.

I’ve never so effortlessly stayed at my goal weight before. My metabolic health markers have never been better. I eat better food, and have far more flexibility. Easier and better, at the same time! What’s not to love?

Now it’s time to make this evidence-based approach easily available to anyone who is interested.

If you’ve been eating a low carb or keto diet, especially with higher amounts of protein, you have already been adopting a higher-satiety way of eating. If you love how you are currently doing with your low carb approach, there is no need to change a thing.

But we know that some people stall on low carb or keto, sometimes because they are eating more fat than they need. Others find keto too restrictive to sustain over months and years.
Just as we introduced higher protein meal plans and advice a year ago, our new, higher-satiety option is an expansion of our low carb advice to enable more people to find the best, most flexible approach for them. It’s an evolution of the same underlying fundamental idea of eating better foods that you can love.

Fundamentally, healthy eating is not about eating less. It’s not about restriction, hunger, guilt, and shame. 

Healthy eating is about eating better. You eat as much or as little as your body needs. No restrictions, no need to count calories. No guilt, just great food to enjoy, great food that gives you energy and strength, that nourishes your body and soul. That’s what higher-satiety eating is about.

It sounds too good to be true, but it works. Studies have demonstrated over and over that foods with these properties – higher protein, lower energy density, more fiber, less hedonic reward – consistently lead to people spontaneously eating far less, while still feeling equally satisfied. It just works.

It’s an evolution. Low carb, but better.

Also, while we are still the #1 low-carb site, if you aren’t interested in low carb eating, that’s no problem! Higher-satiety eating can be applied to all diets and all macronutrient compositions.

So check out our introductory guides and higher-satiety meal plans. And watch our news feed for more links to other higher-satiety resources, coming soon.

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16 comments

  1. 36 comments removed
  2. Alicia W.
    I have moved in this direction myself, so great to see Diet Doctor providing this advice.
  3. Carole Castles
    I have tried this (obviously without the satiety scores) to break a stall, but so many of the lower fat, high protein options come with more carbs per serve. As someone who has to stick to the ketogenic end of the low carb spectrum, I routinely ended up with no ketones (in more pain, more stiffness, poorer sleep) so had to ditch this approach. Also the ‘high satiety’ foods definitely made me stop eating sooner BUT I was hungry again in 3hrs and afraid I’d have to resort to some form of snacking again. Protein fills me up but definitely doesn’t last.
    Reply: #39
  4. Shruti Steele
    I agree with you because I went the same way. I was on high fat keto diet. Went to eating more fiber to eating ketovore and my hormones got messed up big time. Now been a week, back into high fat keto again and my cycles are regulated and pms symptoms are wayyy better. I don’t know about wait but keto diet helps me with my mind, anxiety and love the way I feel on high fat.

    I’ll definitely be incorporating more intermittent fasting (always been difficult due to my insulin resistance) starting from 24 hrs and more to reap more benefits.

  5. 1 comment removed
  6. Candace Loeffler
    I am excited to see beans on the high- satiety end of the chart….I have really missed beans in my low carb eating! Already I feel so much better😘
  7. Bruce
    I did a LCHF diet four years ago and it worked great for me. I now stick to the same diet but with a few more carbs since I'm not trying to lose weight anymore. I've never counted calories and so am surprised to see that the new Satiety diet is supposed to make you feel fuller with the lowest number of calories. I've never counted calories and so am wondering why you are now trying to make this an issue?
    Reply: #43
  8. Kerry Merritt Team Diet Doctor

    I did a LCHF diet four years ago and it worked great for me. I now stick to the same diet but with a few more carbs since I'm not trying to lose weight anymore. I've never counted calories and so am surprised to see that the new Satiety diet is supposed to make you feel fuller with the lowest number of calories. I've never counted calories and so am wondering why you are now trying to make this an issue?

    Hi, Bruce! Thanks for your comment. Different methods work for different people. We're not changing our tune, but simply opening the door for more options. If what you're doing works well for you, there's certainly no reason to change!

  9. Lisa
    I’m interested in this new option, as someone who initially had success with keto (lost 15kg) but have put some of that back on - and suspect it’s due to too much fat and nuts. Is there a satiety score for all foods somewhere on the site? I was wondering about coconut for example. And will all recipes be scored? And are there going to be more recipes soon? I’m keen to try out this new way of doing keto/low carb - but the resources seem limited so far? Thank you.
    Reply: #45
  10. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor

    I’m interested in this new option, as someone who initially had success with keto (lost 15kg) but have put some of that back on - and suspect it’s due to too much fat and nuts. Is there a satiety score for all foods somewhere on the site? I was wondering about coconut for example. And will all recipes be scored? And are there going to be more recipes soon? I’m keen to try out this new way of doing keto/low carb - but the resources seem limited so far? Thank you.

    Yes, this is new content that we are still developing! The recipe team is working hard to create great recipes and meal plans. On the website, the satiety score is already implemented for all recipes. It is included in the full nutrition information when you click the colored carb circle on the recipe picture and the team is working to get it integrated into the app as well. We don't yet have the information for all ingredients available, but that is something the team is working on as well.

  11. Jennifer June
    I tired this diet through my gastro doc several years ago and ended up in the ER, lost too much weight, then he gave me this diet and said try it for gastro problems, this time I started slow and lost ten pounds but my intent is not to lose weight. Now I have liver fibrosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and tired it again. This is no carbs or sugar and eat all the meat, veges and dairy you want. It is supposed to reverse my liver disease but due to heart disease I don't want all this red meat. Any help?
    Reply: #47
  12. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor

    I tired this diet through my gastro doc several years ago and ended up in the ER, lost too much weight, then he gave me this diet and said try it for gastro problems, this time I started slow and lost ten pounds but my intent is not to lose weight. Now I have liver fibrosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and tired it again. This is no carbs or sugar and eat all the meat, veges and dairy you want. It is supposed to reverse my liver disease but due to heart disease I don't want all this red meat. Any help?

    Red meat is an option but is certainly not required. There are many other sources of quality protein you can choose instead. Even though this guide says protein for weight loss, you can still use it as a source of information on quality protein sources in general.
    https://www.dietdoctor.com/high-protein/foods

  13. Belinda
    Giving calculated numerical values to food reminds me a little of Weight Watchers. Cooking an egg with butter lowers the satiety score by 10 points? How did spinach get a perfect score of 100? (No more for me. I am full from all that spinach--said no one ever.) I hope it brings success to others, but I am sticking to old-school LCHF.
  14. Robbie Beechey
    This is the principle that Slimming World has used for many many years. It certainly works for those who want a low fat higher carb approach - you're never hungry eating the Slimming World way. I've no doubt at all it will be equally as good on a low carb route - certainly going to give it a try anyway
  15. M
    Thanks Diet Doctor Team for offering this additional option. Always appreciate your science-based approach and understanding that what works for one may not work for others. I'm grateful I was part of the HSE launch--learned so much! Thank you for all you do for all of us seeking better health thru better eating! Mary P
  16. Vincent
    Hello how is this approach different from the PE Diet?
    Reply: #52
  17. Kristin Parker Team Diet Doctor

    Hello how is this approach different from the PE Diet?

    Our algorithm is a little more complex than the PE ratios, but Dr Naiman has had an instrumental role in helping us develop our algorithm and high protein and now high satiety approach.

  18. Vincent
    Dr. Naiman gave us a PE formula that we could then use with macronutrients of each food to determine healthy eating. I see a number of foods listed with high satiety scores but is there a high satiety formula we can use to determine the scores for every food? Of course everyone eats differently with some eating meat others not etc. It would be nice to have a generic formula. Thank you.

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