Lose Weight

Top 10 Fattest Countries in the World – 2016 List

Here’s the top 10 fattest countries in the world in 2016. The top of the list might surprise you:

Gazette Review: Top 10 Fattest Countries in the World – 2016 List

The number one country is Kuwait and number 2 is Saudi Arabia, and the list contains several other Muslim countries with hot climates. So why?

There’s a simple possible explanation. When it’s hot you need to drink a lot. And if you’re Muslim you’re not likely to drink alcohol. So what will it be? For many people it’s soda or other sugary drinks. The number one thing that makes people fat.

More

How to Lose Weight

Top videos on weight loss

More >

Related movies

Earlier

Malnutrition and Obesity Common in the World – at the Same Time!

Have Obesity-Related Diseases Begun to Shorten Life Expectancy in the US?

Baby Boomers Will Become Sicker Seniors Than Earlier Generations

Low Carb Made Easy How to Lose Weight Low-Carb Recipes Low-Carb Success Stories

20 Comments

  1. Lucy
    Andreas, Your point about soda consumption in Middle Eastern countries is a mistake based on lack of knowledge. You need to correct it.

    In the elite, the young may drink soda, but it's a small minority. Most people, of all socioeconomic levels, drink tea, and you drink your tea with four sugars. The main reason for the region's high diabetes and prediabetes rate is that for economic and price reasons, most people eat proportionally more rice and bread and proportionally less meat. Meat is very expensive, and outside the elites people can't and don't afford itn They eat a very little meat on special occasions and mainly eat beans and veg with large amounts of rice. Generally they fill up on rice, and bread to a lesser extent.

    I say this having lived in Cairo, Egypt, for fifteen years. It's an economic phenomenon. Middle Eastern societies are very hierarchical.

    Please correct this, it's just wrong and makes you look uninformed.

    Replies: #3, #15, #19
  2. Mike Scott
    He wasn't actually wrong! The doctor's point was "drinks with sugar".

    Michael Scott
    Ottawa, Canada

  3. Lucy,
    I added "or other sugary drinks". Surely sugared tea is also a big factor.

    But I don't think it's true that people in the Middle East do not drink much soda. For example, Saudi Arabia has one of the highest levels of soda consumption in the world!
    http://www.worldatlas.com/articles/countries-with-the-highest-levels-...

  4. Anonymous
    Did you seriously just pin this on religion?
  5. Grant
    What no Polynesians countries on the list?
    I see your list and raise you mine -
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/maps-and-graphics/the-most-obese-fa...
    Reply: #8
  6. Pamela M
    Living in the United States, I am surprised that the U.S. is not #1. Makes me truly sad for the countries #9 - #1. What is also sad is that so many other countries still have an enormous obesity and overweight problem, even if they did not make the top 10.
  7. Anne
    Really sorry Mike, I didn't mean to report your comment!
  8. Valerie
    I had the same reaction. No Pacific island? What?
  9. Noa
    Also, if you analize these ethnic groups's food culture, you can see that they are mostly grain based, since almost forever. Sure, every now and then they ate lamb, but it always was for special occasions and celebrations. It's mostly grains like Burgul, freekeh (which is a kind of wheat) and some legumes like Humus and of course the famous Pita bread. The logic behind it was (and still is) that you can feed many people cheaply.
    And today, while still based on grains (with all it's carbs and anti nutrients), these cultures are now also swimming in sugar.
    Reply: #10
  10. bill
    "...grain based, since almost forever."

    10,000 years is not "almost forever."
    No human diet was grain based more
    than 10,000 years ago. See Dr. Eades's
    video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RprGtr_cHlY&list=PLrVWtWmYRR2BYj...

    Humans were not designed to thrive
    on grain and have not developed the
    ability to do so over the past 10,000 years.

  11. Nitin Kumar Modi
    The bottom line is that sodas contribute a lot to increased health issues as they are economically cheaper and utility driven.
  12. Sancy
    Don't agree that he is trying to pin it on religion!
    Having lived in Egypt for over five years and my husband being Egyptian I see for myself the young drinking cheap sugary drinks! The coke in Cairo and all over Egypt is much sweeter than coke in the UK. You see a lot of very young children (not the elite) being given a big bag of crisps all to themselves?
    A very unhealthy diet at times and very sugar based. Not just sodas!
    Reply: #17
  13. Derek
    Spent a year in Bahrain. Plenty of "real sugar" sodas everyone enjoyed and a few energy drinks with so much in them I've never seen them in the states. Makes Red Bull look like green tea.
  14. Andy
    Why do we automatically assume this to be true when data on "obesity" is far from being accurate? BMI data is the only data out there about obesity, the definition of "obesity" is set very low and BMI does not accurately record someone's body fat, especially given that there are people who are TOFI. Speaking of TOFI, that touches on a larger public health problem of METABOLIC SYNDROME! That is the real problem. Not obesity in and of itself and you can be skinny as a rail and have metabolic problems.

    BTW... When an article brings up "Supersize Me" and then talks about "junk food" at McDonald's, they mean the burgers with all that unhealthy saturated fat. That means they are still in the Matrix (an artificial world where healthy food is low in fat & calories) because they haven't swallowed the red pill yet (and realized that saturated animal fat is good for you).

  15. Ashkar
    Lucy,

    Andreas is right on this, i have plenty of relatives and friends throughout the Middle East, and been to UAE myself. The culture and food that you see in countries like Saudi, Kuwait, UAE etc are very different from what what you see in Egypt, Morocco etc. (They both are African though, Not ME)

    Coke is like a national drink for them, regardless of social class.. its been even cheaper than water, just not sure if the prices have gone high recently.

    Reply: #16
  16. Victor
    Coke cheaper than water.... that goes the same in the U.S. I can walk in any given convenience store and find a bottle of soda that will be cheaper than a bottle of water. Really good incentive for health, isn't it? [sarcasm]
    Reply: #18
  17. Ashkar
    He was not blaming any religion.. it's just a social situation and he is right.. being a muslim myself, we don't eat pork or drink alcohol, so that does limit our options. And when water is costlier then coke or anything alike you know what people would go for. Social situations in african nations like Egypt might be different. Iam Indian btw
  18. Ashkar
    Aha.. luckily in India water is still cheaper than coke :)
  19. Ahmed Zubair
    Can't say about Egypt but that's very true about UAE, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and other GCC countries. Some people drink more soft drinks than water! And it's not only that people can't afford to have good healthy food. They are addicted to unhealthy fast food loaded with sugars and carbs. There are an unbelievable number of fast food chain outlets spread throughout these countries.
  20. Bec
    I'd like to add another thought here other than the heat and the price:
    A friend of mine who came back from a recent trip abroad mentioned that often it is safer to drink Coke than tap water or bottled water of questionable origin. Even when potable water is available from the tap, the taste is not always great. In Dubai, for example, the majority of the water supply comes from desalinated sea water. If you've never tasted that, let me tell you it's not delicious.
    On the other hand, coke usually has a reliable taste and is reliably safe to consume.

Leave a Reply

Reply to comment #0 by

Older posts