The Swedish LCHF-Revolution Going Strong

Expressen April

All about LCHF, #2

Here’s the latest news from the Swedish Low Carb High Fat scene. One of the biggest papers in Sweden had a 100 page supplement called “All about LCHF” back in January. It was a massive success, selling out quickly in many places. So they’ve decided to make it a recurring monthly supplement starting now. The second one is out this week.

Could you imaging having a paper about high fat nutrition in every newsstand where you live?

32 Comments

Top Comments

  1. Lipophila
    Congrats, Dr. Eenfeldt ;-) and thank you again and again for your great work that changed my life and the lives of thousands of others! Even in the german speaking countries the message now spreads thanks to Nicole Lindborgs site and the wonderful german bloggers and there's a german paleo-movement, too! The day is near, when my friends and colleagues instead of secretly waiting for me to drop dead because of all the saturated fat I eat will start asking me which brand of coconut oil to buy... :-)
    Read more →
  2. Anja
    In Finland they also started giving out a magazine that promotes low-carb :) The information is spreading!

    I'm writing a small introduction about LCHF myself. Since I work for an international media house the article should get translated into quite many languages ;)

    Read more →

All Comments

  1. Hugo
    Are they publishing an english version?

    Thanx :)

  2. Bev
    Yes would be great to have English version !!
  3. Hugo,
    Sorry, no.
  4. Just learn Swedish guys! :)
  5. Jean (UK)
    I will have to learn Swedish! First Andreas's book and now this!
  6. Lipophila
    Congrats, Dr. Eenfeldt ;-) and thank you again and again for your great work that changed my life and the lives of thousands of others! Even in the german speaking countries the message now spreads thanks to Nicole Lindborgs site and the wonderful german bloggers and there's a german paleo-movement, too! The day is near, when my friends and colleagues instead of secretly waiting for me to drop dead because of all the saturated fat I eat will start asking me which brand of coconut oil to buy... :-)
  7. Anja
    In Finland they also started giving out a magazine that promotes low-carb :) The information is spreading!

    I'm writing a small introduction about LCHF myself. Since I work for an international media house the article should get translated into quite many languages ;)

  8. Seems like "Expressen" (second largest tabloid paper in Sweden) after the huge success of thier first LCHF-supplement, still underestimated the demand for the next. I boought it on monday when it was first sold... and it is suppossed to be sold togheter with the tabloid until this friday.

    At the supermarket (CityGross) here in Uppsala it was all sold out after the first day when I went there today to shop real food (tuesday) and their tobacco- and gambling-store next doors only had three copies left. On Andreas Swedish blogg there has already been complaints that this LCHF-supplement is already sold out.

  9. Alexandra M
    This is great! Are there any statistics yet on whether obesity is trending downward?

    I think it would also be a good idea to encourage people to keep getting bloodwork done - it would give the movement even more of a boost if doctors saw an improvement trend in CHD markers, and then started talking to each other about the "surprising" results their patients have had.

    If people don't stay connected with doctors, doctors (mostly) will assume that people are giving themselves heart disease even if they are losing weight. (Which is exactly what my friends in Norway think: "Sure they're losing weight, but they're all going to have heart attacks.")

  10. That is great news, Dr. Eenfeldt! Congratulations!

    I hope that LCHF will soon become a mainstream dietary option, in Sweden and the rest of the world. I hope that, in the very near future, all doctors will consider LCHF diet as the best antidote to carbohydrate poisoning which manifests itself as weight gain, obesity, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure, unstable blood sugar, and, ultimately type-2 diabetes.

    I can’t imagine having a paper about LCHF nutrition on every newsstand where I live (Canada) anytime soon. One of our major daily papers, The Toronto Star, still publishes articles about which “diet” to use as a quick fix to lose weight (http://www.healthzone.ca/health/newsfeatures/article/1157204--beach-body-countdown-diet-decoder) to get ready for “swim suit season” completely missing the point and trivializing the health implications of being overweight and obese and the impact those health implications will continue to have on the economy.

    For example, we know that the average age of a type-2 diabetic has already fallen from 54 to 46. If we add on the impacts of increased susceptibility to other conditions, such as heart disease, cancer, kidney disease, blindness, and amputations, as well as more days off work, early retirement and below average productivity, then we can clearly see that how we look in a swim suit is completely irrelevant.

  11. eddie watts
    cannot imagine this would happen in UK
    well done to Sweden and all the hard work you have all put in.
  12. Chooky
    What do you think it is about Sweden, culturally, that has led to this acceptance of what is considered a very off-beat view of obesity and health? To answer your question, I don't see it likely that such popularity would occur in the U.S. Even with a plethora of U.S. based books, blogs, articles, experts etc. on LCHF it still hasn't taken root here. It's popular but not even close to being mainstream.
  13. Janknitz
    "What do you think it is about Sweden, culturally, that has led to this acceptance of what is considered a very off-beat view of obesity and health?"

    I'm curious about this, too, and something I read in "the Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living" . It says that Scandanavians--among others--had no agricultural carbohydrates suitable for growing in their climates until the potato was brought to Europe in the 16th Century. I'd never heard that before and cannot verify the truth of the statement, but it is something to consider. (Weren't they able to grow grain in Scandanavia long before that???).

    Anyway, I wonder if the traditional "native" diet is fairly low in carbohydrates such that it wasn't a huge emphasis in the first place as it is in countries like the US? And natural fats were never completely eliminated from the diet as they were in the US? So therefore, it might be easier for a Swede to adapt to the LCHF diet, since many traditional foods might already fit that description? Whereas in the US, "traditional" foods are processed carbs--pasta, pizza, breads, cereals, etc. with the possible exception of the Thanksgiving Turkey.

  14. Galina L.
    I hope in the USA they will not catch-up with Sweeden soon. Meanwhile I selfishly enjoy free beef fat from my butcher and super-cheep organ meats. I wonder how long such good live is going to last here.
  15. Donna E
    Jankitz's questions are all ones I would love to see answered! Hope you can get to them, Andreas!
  16. Margaretrc
    That is AWESOME! Since our news outlets do (sometimes) pay attention to what goes on in Europe, I can only hope that news of this will filter through to here and that people will say "????--another paradox or are we being fed a ton of balony?"
  17. Jon Jonsson
    From Sweden myself and I'm not sure why the lchf-diet is so popular here.
    Perhaps some of these pionts matters.
    - Internet.
    The accumulation and distribution of knowledge via internet is important and a big part of the population use internet
    - Admiratin of the "Natural"
    Swedes loves the nature. And perhaps thats why we like butter and not artificial fats.
    - Tradition of working with "People education"
    Perhaps we have a little more people who want to inform and little less who think of how they can make business of it (like "LowCarb-products" with many carbs)
  18. Zepp
    @13

    Its probably like mr Jonsson says, a small population, words travel fast, high education, high living standard, who leads to choises and to admire natural and healty living!

    We did grow grains of all sorst before potato, moste oat, barley and rye!

    Befor potatoes we did grow rutabaga/swede!!

    In old times our population was almoste free pesants, not that much ownd by landlords.

    Some says that whats the major contribution to our sociaty is the history of 400 years with free pesants.

  19. moreporkplease
    "It says that Scandanavians--among others--had no agricultural carbohydrates suitable for growing in their climates until the potato was brought to Europe in the 16th Century."

    This just isn't true. Scandinavians have a long history with oats and rye. Many parts of Scandinavia are famous for their heritage, old-fashioned wheats. For example, the wheat from the Swedish island of Hven is particularly famous, as is that from Danish Bornholm.

  20. Sonia
    The industry needs a magazine like this but it has to be translated into different languages. If this magazine was in English I would definitely buy it. There is a gap in the market for a product like this.
  21. Janknitz
    Morepork, any historical data on when these grains began to be cultivated there? I didn't think it sounded correct when I read that. Potatoes yes, because they came from the "New World", but I'd be surprised if that's true of grains.
  22. Zepp
    Here you can read about stoneage in skandinavia.. Google translated.. but I think you can get the big picture anyway.

    http://translate.google.se/translate?sl=sv&tl=en&js=n&...

    And here about ironage!

    http://translate.google.se/translate?sl=sv&tl=en&js=n&...

  23. we need this in the USA!
  24. Maggan A
    moreporke #19

    some islands in the south do not say the whole truth. If you look at the map you'll see that most of Scandinavia is in the Arctic region where it has never been possible to grow grain. Same thing with the archipelagos of both West and East coast. There, people have traditionally been living of fish and wildlife. Alternatively, slaughter a pig and use every bit of it.

    "It says that Scandanavians--among others--had no agricultural carbohydrates suitable for growing in their climates until the potato was brought to Europe in the 16th Century."

    Yes it is partly true, whith exeptions for the warmer south of the region (south Sweden and Denmark).

  25. Funderaren
    The reason why LCHF came in so strong in sweden was that people had already started to question factory produced products filled with chemical ingridience. GI based diets had started to get hold in the country. So the foundation of accepting natural fat in your diet was already there.

    And Dr Dahlqvist was making alot of "noise" in the press with LCHF and the race was on.

    Natural food -> GI -> Dr Dalhqvist LCHF -> Dr Eenfeldt Dietdoctor

  26. Jennifer
    @Janknitz,

    As a Swede I would say we have a lot of carbs in our traditional food, potatoes and bread have been main parts of our meals for a very long time. Also, more and more rice and pasta have made their way onto our plates as we are very receptive to new cultural experiences.

    I think there are two main reasons for lchf being so successful in Sweden:
    1. We have two doctors (Andreas and Annika) who deliver statistics and facts (with sources), they publish people's own stories and have seen the results themselves. They are not manically trying to convert people, they simply put their arguments out there and leave it to the readers to decide what to believe.
    2. The fat frightened opponents are extremely contradictive and "loud" when dismissing the lchf diet as deathly and unhealthy. They refer to "facts" that they cannot back up, they say that studies show that lchf increases the risk of cancer/heart desease however in the same sentence they say that there are no longterm studies to prove the effects of lchf.

    Personally, the more I read about lchf the more reasonable it seems that this is the healthiest diet. If the opponents could show real studies that actually shows any indication that it would be bad for us, then i would probably stop. But so far I have seen nothing.

  27. Maggan A
    Jennifer #26

    I agree to your points 1 and 2 but we would not know about them if it was not for The Internet.

    I like to add a point 3.

    In 2010 as many as 91% of the swedes had Internet-access in there homes. I don´t know about the rest of the world - but we swedes have always been on top worldwide with using new technology.

    I belive The Internet can never be underestimatet when it comes to spread new ideas to the masses ;-)

  28. I thought maybe Sweden and other Scandinavian countries had not gotten so fat-phobic as we in
    the U.S. did. Or maybe your population is just sharper, and spot a good thing faster. :-)
    Thanks, whatever the reason.
  29. Maggan A
    sugarholics

    I don´t belive Sweedes (or other Scandinavians) are sharper than anyone else. But in a population of only 9 million people and more than 90% of them online - maybe news travelles faster ;-)

  30. Olivia Nilsson
    Have recently moved to Sweden (am English) with my Swedish husband, and we have just both started with LCHF. Please can someone post the name of the Swedish newspaper that started this thread??? I am having trouble with so many eggs, and so much meat... feels like a block of cement in my stomac, but suspect it is something one has to get used to... Will try to fill up more on the veggies that are allowed.
  31. Johanna
    @ Olivia Nilsson

    First of all, Welcome to Sweden!

    The newapaper is called Expressen, and there is also a new attatchment with Sweden's biggest newspaper, Aftonbladet, although I am not sure how often it will be released.

    Some of my suggestions if you're new to LCHF, and want some information from Swedish pioneers on the subject:
    Diet Doctor of course!
    Anna Hallen - annahallen.se
    Doctor Annica Dahlqvist - http://annikadahlqvist.com/.
    There are loads and loads of more sites aswell. Just go to google.se and enter LCHF - you'll see! :)

    For cooking tips I always browse http://birgittahoglundsmat.wordpress.com/ or http://www.kostradgivarna.se/

    For your tummy issues, it CAN be a bit difficult in the beginning for some, until you get past the ignition period so to say. For me it was nausea, but so worth it once you get in the LCHF 'zone'. :D

    Hope this will help, and sorry that most of these sites are in Swedish. Google translate can be a bit tricky sometimes, so it you're lucky, maybe your husband will help you translate!

    Good luck!

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