My Blood Sugar After Two Different Meals at the Diabetes Conference

2 bloodsugar

Here’s the obvious thing, that is being ignored at the diabetes conference. Instead, medications, advanced tests and molecules are discussed.

Above are my blood sugar levels after the lunch bag (with chips and chocolate) at the conference, and then after a decent low-carb lunch, that I bought at a restaurant.

The tests are represented above with red circles (the chips lunch) and green triangles (eggs, olives and tuna fish salad and a goulash soup), respectively. Unfortunately I measured my blood sugar far fewer times after the second meal, but the difference is still obvious.

These are the results in a healthy, lean person. How much bigger do you think the difference would have been for a diabetic that really doesn’t tolerate large amounts of carbohydrates?

None of the drugs presented at the conference are without side effects. Yet, even combined, they won’t come close to providing the same effect that you get from just changing what you eat – which also provides many more benefits than just blood sugar improvements.

Unfortunately, it’s difficult to make money from serving diabetics quality food. There’s big money in daily pills and injections. And it’s hard to make scientists and pharmaceutical business leaders change their view if it leads to a loss of income.

Previously

My Health Markers After Eight Years on LCHF

Lunch at the Diabetes Conference

Previous success stories

“You Have Diabetes and You Are Going to Have It for the Rest of Your Life”

The Doctor. “Have You Started an LCHF Diet, Or Something?” 

Before and After Six Weeks on an LCHF Diet

More

Diabetes – How to Normalize Your Blood Sugar

LCHF for Beginners

22 comments

Top comments

  1. Nancy
    There is not only money to be made, people don't want change. They would RATHER have 8 pills and 6 shots a day than change the way they eat. I know this, I'm a nurse for 38 years. I observe this pattern of thought and the hideous side effects every day.
    Reply: #15
    Read more →
  2. Christoph
    That's unbelievable... i am from Austria and most of our Diabetes patients have a lot crazier measurements, but only a handful of doctors actually react the right way...

    @Cindy: My grandma has Diabetes Type II since 1970s. Last year she already took 6 pills a day. She wrote down all her blood-glucose-measurements back then and what she ate too.

    I Quote directly: 2 Bananas. Measurement 30min later: 229mg/dl (around 12 or so).

    Today she no longer takes any pill, thanks to LCHF and Andreas Eenfeldt. In comparison: Today her lunch was meat and vegetables. Her measurement 30min later: 92mg/dl (around 5).

    Reply: #14
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All comments

  1. Mark John
    Unfortunately, you can't say the "difference is obvious" based on your second blood glucose readings, and it's a shame.

    In the first graph you have have 10 data points in the first couple of hours. In the second you have two. You can't simply therefore assume what happened in those first two hours in the second graph - which is what you're doing - despite it being "obvious".

    It's a shame that the temporal data points aren't the same in both graphs. If they were, it would make the argument far more compelling regardless of how "obvious" it is to us "converts"!

    Reply: #10
  2. Alain
    "There’s big money in daily pills and injections."

    That is the point.

    Most people prefer to have daily pills and injections instead of giving up junk food.

    http://images-2.drive.com.au/2014/04/07/5329354/tecoma-wide-620x349.jpg

    Reply: #7
  3. Cindy
    I'd be interested in seeing a graph like this done on an actual diabetic to see how they cope with the two different diets rather than a healthy person.
  4. Christoph
    That's unbelievable... i am from Austria and most of our Diabetes patients have a lot crazier measurements, but only a handful of doctors actually react the right way...

    @Cindy: My grandma has Diabetes Type II since 1970s. Last year she already took 6 pills a day. She wrote down all her blood-glucose-measurements back then and what she ate too.

    I Quote directly: 2 Bananas. Measurement 30min later: 229mg/dl (around 12 or so).

    Today she no longer takes any pill, thanks to LCHF and Andreas Eenfeldt. In comparison: Today her lunch was meat and vegetables. Her measurement 30min later: 92mg/dl (around 5).

    Reply: #14
  5. Michael
    Whoa there! Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt, are these your testing results? You mention these results are from a "healthy, lean" person, but it has been my experience that no non-diabetic would have test results this high after a meal - no matter what they were eating! Are you pre-diabetic (not that I believe in that designation)?
  6. Mark John
    Physiological Insulin Resistance is the reason and it's also why if you took a glucose tolerance test while on a low carb or ketogenic diet, you would (probably) fail.

    Being low carb or keto will induce such a response until the body adapts to increased carbs again. For that to happen you need a few days of increased carbs, not a single lunch!

    Am I correct Dr Andreas?

  7. Victor
    "Most people prefer to have daily pills and injections instead of giving up junk food."

    I heartily agree. Most people will do anything to avoid giving up foods they are addicted to.

    In my experience, they will try any exercise for weight loss rather than give up a food.
    They will cut down on serving portions - but not eliminate the food.
    They will add all sorts of supplements, everything from vitamins, vinegar, powdered greens, minerals, and hormones in an effort to lose weight, but avoid eliminating foods.

    The biggest mantra I hear is "everything in moderation". This essentially means that they don't want to give up foods, but maybe scale back a little. Oh, the things a person will do to avoid eliminating bad foods from their meals.

  8. Janknitz
    Wouldn't it be interesting to hand out freebie blood glucose meters and test strips to conference attendees after lunch and let them all SEE what it's doing to their own blood sugars???
  9. Rachel
    I would love to see the same graph, but with a third meal added: A SAD-compliant "healthy" meal.
  10. Tyrannocaster
    Mark John, you're incorrect in stating you can't compare the two readings because reading 1 has more data points than reading 2: just eliminate the extra data points from reading 1, leaving the data points that correspond temporally with those in reading 2. You'll miss the "spikiest" of the points, but it is still demonstrably better than the first reading.
    Reply: #13
  11. murray
    The data points on the non-carby meal are consistent with mine. My blood glucose is generally in the 4.0 to 4.5 range. After a meal it does not change much, if at all. Looking at a cookbook with photos (food porn) for 20 minutes raises blood sugar more. I measure blood sugar daily and I've never measured my blood sugar above 5.2, and that was in the morning after having a late, protein-heavy meal the night before. Excess protein is the metabolic equivalent of slow carbs, which is why LCHF should be moderate protein and not high protein.
  12. Nancy
    There is not only money to be made, people don't want change. They would RATHER have 8 pills and 6 shots a day than change the way they eat. I know this, I'm a nurse for 38 years. I observe this pattern of thought and the hideous side effects every day.
    Reply: #15
  13. Mark John
    Tyrannocaster wrote:

    Mark John, you're incorrect in stating you can't compare the two readings because reading 1 has more data points than reading 2: just eliminate the extra data points from reading 1, leaving the data points that correspond temporally with those in reading 2. You'll miss the "spikiest" of the points, but it is still demonstrably better than the first reading.

    You're incorrect. It's very sloppy science to have two data points over two hours and then assume that there were no spikes in between those two points, particularly when you're comparing those data against a different set of measures where you had TEN data points! Graphs such as those presented above would be rejected from a high school biology project never mind anything else.

    There may have been a glucose spike at 7, 8, 9, 10 or 11 mg/dl after 20 minutes, 40 minutes or one hour in the second graph, then a subsequent fall. We can never know because the data isn't there. I am very comfortable "assuming " that there wasn't such a spike, but I wouldn't publish such a result based on those two data points and state "assumptions".

    Making assumptions is NOT what science is about. Let's leave such sloppy science to big pharma.

  14. Cindy C
    Article on the benefits of treating those with prediabetes the same as those with diabetes. The article mentions life style changes and medication, but did not mention what change in life style, except to say to keep normal blood sugar control.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140924134649.htm

  15. Murray
    The anthropologist Margaret Mead observed that it is easier to change a person's religion than their diet.
  16. Stephen
    Just for fun, I also compared by blood glucose response to a 200g Rye bread meal (700 cal) to an egg and cheese omelette (400 cal).

    I got the big glucose response for the high-carb meal (> 145 mg/dl).
    But interestingly, I got a non-zero glucose response for the no-carb omelette (~ 130 mg/dl).

    Does anyone know why I'd get any glucose response at all from a no-carb meal?

    Here's a plot:
    http://2lbsofstarch.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/screen-shot-2014-09-2...

    Replies: #17, #18, #21
  17. Oliver
    Stephen, you look to be diabetic. If you hadn't walked up a hill and sprinted, how high would have it gone after the bread meal?

    I don't know why you'd get a spike like that after the no-carb meal. Protein is very slowly converted to glucose. You don't see spikes eating protein and fat.

    Reply: #19
  18. erdoke
    Both eggs and cheese contain some carbs, but you don't even need carbs to get glucose response from a meal.
    Reply: #20
  19. Stephen
    Oliver,

    I'm not diabetic. My doctor loves my health, I'm extremely active, and I feel great. But, you never know, and it's probably a good idea to take it easy on the pancreas.

    I'll measure another blood glucose response to a high-carb meal, without moving, and we'll see what it peaks at. I'm pretty sure it's all normal though. It might go to ~160 mg/dl in the first 15-20 min, then slowly decay. That's my guess.

    Stephen

  20. Stephen
    erdoke,

    Good to know. I assumed my non-zero blood glucose response to the low-carb meal was normal. I did a quick search on why a 0 carb meal causes a non-zero blood glucose response, but didn't find any simple answers.

    I don't think it matters. The body seems to be doing the right thing.

    Steve

  21. Murray
    An egg and cheese omelette is so delightly good that you had an adrenalin rush which caused a sharp spike in blood sugar that quickly cleared.
  22. xiltron
    "Yet, even combined, they won’t come close to providing the same effect that you get from just changing what you eat"

    Yeah, Type 1s should just change the way they eat and abstain from insulin injections. Great advice. Not.

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