Archive | Food

Paleo Baby

Paleo baby

Here’s my 8 month-old daughter Alva, gnawing on a bone. Why am I showing you this? Let me tell you.

Today the Paleo f(x) conference starts in Austin, Texas and we’re there to check it out. I’m a big fan of Paleo diets and evolutionary thinking in general. Even more so when it comes to healthy lifestyles, where having an evolutionary template is critical for making sense of all the conflicting messages.

For a growing child, an evolutionarily appropriate environment is probably more important than ever.

My daughter Alva is not starting her life eating pre-packaged powder-based fake food. She’s eating real food, using all of her four teeth. She’s not even fond of pureed food anymore. She likes boiled vegetables with melted butter. Scrambled eggs. And tiny pieces of meat. Basically she’s starting to eat the same things as the rest of the family.

Both Alva and her 3.5-year-old big sister Klara are insanely healthy and happy kids. Perhaps we are just lucky. But then again, perhaps it’s not just luck. Continue Reading →

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Evening Snacks For Kids at Diet Doctor’s

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Are there any good alternatives to evening snacks – without a lot of sugar and junk food – that are appreciated by young kids?

If you ask Klara, 3 years old, this it the perfect alternative (water to go with it). This is what she wants from the grocery store. Perhaps because she never got used to anything sweeter.

What do you serve as an evening snack?

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Diet_Doctor on Instagram

Diet Doctor Instagram

It was only a matter of time as I really enjoy taking pictures (of food): Diet_Doctor is now available on Instagram as well. Notice the “_” sign between the two words, the other name was taken.

Feel free to follow for updates and inspiration about great LCHF food – including for small children. You can also already check out the hottest LCHF breakfast in Sweden.

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Feeding Infants Gluten INCREASES the Risk of Gluten Intolerance

Future glutenintolerants?

On the road to gluten intolerance?

Do you have an infant and wonder about the official speculative and controversial advice to give gluten (wheat-based food) to infants early, under “protection of nursing”? Forget this piece of advice.

I’m sure it’s well-meaning advice (whether or not it has been influenced by formula-manufacturers) but new science shows with certainty that this is wrong. This past fall I wrote about two new high-quality studies that show that early gluten introduction on the contrary INCREASES the risk for early gluten intolerance.

The other day, yet another study came out that blew another hole in the official dietary guidelines. However, this is just a statistical observational study. Children in various countries don’t develop less gluten intolerance if they are introduced to gluten earlier.

On the contrary, Swedish children, who on average are given gluten earlier than children in other countries, are significantly MORE gluten intolerant compared to American children, who are given gluten later than all other. This new statistics further supports last fall’s high-quality studies.

Do you want to avoid that your child becomes gluten intolerant, or at least postpone potential future intolerance? The best science we have then points in this direction: The later you have gluten and the less you have, the better it is.

Time for an Update?

So when will the agencies that issue dietary guidelines update themselves and stop giving advice on early gluten-introduction? Who knows. Judging from their record on the issue of natural saturated fat they can be at least a decade behind the science.

Perhaps todays infants will see updated official advice when they have their own children? Continue Reading →

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Scientists Against Sugar

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Do we really need scientists to tell us how harmful sugar is? Yes, unfortunately. And here they are:

Researchers highlight strong links between sugar and chronic disease:
UCSF Launches Sugar Science Initiative

“The average American consumes nearly three times the recommended amount of added sugar every day, which is taking a tremendous toll on our nation’s health,” said Laura Schmidt, PhD, a UCSF professor in the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy and the lead investigator on the project. “This is the definitive science that establishes the causative link between sugar and chronic disease across the population.” Continue Reading…

Continue Reading →

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“Sugar Is Harming Our Children”

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Swedish science journalist Dr. Ann Fernholm has been very active in the sugar debate lately:

The extremely sugary products, which the industry is marketing with happy characters should be banned; foods that we’d never even let our pets eat, should not be sold as food for our children.

Here’s her great opinion piece at SVT Opinion translated from Swedish: Continue Reading →

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New Solid Studies: The Advice on Gluten for Infants Needs to Be Changed!

Babies eating a roll

Future Gluten Intolerants?

This is a question that I frequently get and that many parents of infants struggle with: Is it important for infants to eat gluten, ie bread and hot cereal, early in life?

Even today the official guidelines encourage parents to introduce foods with wheat early to reduce the risk of gluten intolerance. This is what the Swedish guidelines for infants include:

If the infant is given small amounts of gluten while still nursing, the risk that the child will be gluten intolerant is reduced. At no later than six months, and no earlier than four months, you should start giving the infant some gluten-containing foods… For example, you can let the infant have a bite of white bread or crackers or a small spoon of hot cereal or wheat-based formula a couple of times a week… After six months gradually increase the amount. 

This assertive advice is unfortunately based only on uncertain statistics from questionnaire studies, i.e. observational studies. Such statistics prove nothing. The guideline-issuing authorities have a troublesome ability to sound certain without enough supporting evidence.

So is the advice above good or bad? Nobody knew before, but now this has finally been tested seriously.

The other week two critical studies were published in the New England Journal of Medicine – the world’s most respected medical science journal. For the first time studies were designed to test whether the advice works. Continue Reading →

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