Could Drinking Milk Shorten Your Life?

milk

A big new Swedish study on milk consumption has gained some attention. It suggests that people who drink a lot of milk live shorter lives on average, and perhaps in addition have an increased risk of bone fractures:

BBC: High milk diet “may not cut risk of bone fractures”

Again, this is only based on statistics from questionnaires – i.e. an observational study. Thus it’s by no means proof that milk shortens life. To know for sure the theory has to be tested in intervention studies, which is much harder and vastly more expensive.

But the statistics from the study are still worth pondering. My conclusion is that it’s wise to only drink milk regularly in larger quantities only as a child, not as an adult. Milk is very insulin stimulating, both through lactose, and through a special milk protein, which stimulates desirable growth in young children.

As an adult, it may be wiser to drink water on a regular basis and wine for festive occasions. As well as tea or coffee at your convenience.

Reducing milk consumption may also help to maintain a stable weight, by keeping insulin levels down. In particular, low-fat milk should be avoided. It could also be called white soda. Continue Reading →

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Last Week Tonight about Sugar

Several people have told me about this anti-sugar rant from John Oliver recently, on Last Week Tonight. It’s pretty funny.

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WSJ: The Last Anti-Fat Crusaders

Here’s a nice op ed published in the Wall Street Journal:

WSJ: The Last Anti-Fat Crusaders

The illustration is badly chosen, as this meal is likely to contain more sugar and other bad carbs than anything else. The article is good though. The author, Nina Teicholz, also wrote the new book The Big Fat Surprise on the same topic.

Continue Reading →

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”Looks Like The Medical Establishment Was Wrong About Fat”

butter-28

Is natural fat bad for you? Hardly. Here’s yet another fine article about the ongoing shift in scientific position regarding fat and carbohydrates:

Business Insider: Looks Like The Medical Establishment Was Wrong About Fat

The new dietary study they’re referring to is this one. Continue Reading →

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“Without a Doubt, Definitely the Best Decision I Have Ever Made”

Before and after

Before and after

Weight loss on LCHF – even if it’s 121 lbs (55 kg) in eight months – is often just a welcome bonus. Emmy Frisk knows this. She emailed me her story, and what a story: Continue Reading →

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“I Finally Kept My Promise to My Mom”

Before and after

Before and after

Here’s a story about a long struggle ending in success… by doing the opposite. A story about regaining health and losing weight – by eating MORE.

Christoph in Austria sent me his story about how he finally kept the promise he had given his mother: Continue Reading →

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Carb-Loaded: the Best Low-Carb Movie Ever?

This might be the best low-carb movie ever. It’s just been released and you can watch it online:

Watch Carb-Loaded

Back in August 2013 the readers of this blog (and its Swedish cousin) helped kickstart production of Carb-Loaded.

The creators, Lathe Poland and Eric Carlsen, have since done a terrific job of interviewing almost everyone in the low-carb community – like professor Tim Noakes, Gary Taubes et al (and me) – plus many other experts in food and nutrition, like Drs. David Katz, Marion Nestle and Yoni Freedhoff.

They’ve done loads of interviews, but that’s not what’s most impressive about this movie. What’s most impressive is how funny it is. I’ve basically heard all the information covered before, but I still found myself sitting with a silly grin on my face through much of the movie.

There’s some pretty impressive animation work lightening up the film too. But my favorite is the obnoxious doctor who sort of represents the conventional “wisdom” of our time. Reportedly the character was inspired by “dr Spaceman” in the TV series 30 Rock – if you’ve seen him you know what to expect.

Here’s a sneak peek of Carb-Loaded:

Did you like that? Check out the whole movie online here:

Watch Carb-Loaded

If you’d rather order a physical DVD or Blu-Ray disc, or if you want to check out other Carb-Loaded merchandise (like T-shirts) have a look at their online store. I you’d like, you can use the coupon code “DIETDOCTOR” for a 25% discount.

What do you think about the movie?

Note: I have no financial interests in the video streaming or the merchandise above.

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“Before, I Was Ruled by Food”

Emma1

Before and after 3 months

Emma had tried to lose weight with much effort and little results. Here’s her story about what happened in a few months when she instead followed her dad’s advice and tried an LCHF diet: Continue Reading →

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New Solid Studies: The Advice on Gluten for Infants Needs to Be Changed!

Babies eating a roll

Future Gluten Intolerants?

This is a question that I frequently get and that many parents of infants struggle with: Is it important for infants to eat gluten, ie bread and hot cereal, early in life?

Even today the official guidelines encourage parents to introduce foods with wheat early to reduce the risk of gluten intolerance. This is what the Swedish guidelines for infants include:

If the infant is given small amounts of gluten while still nursing, the risk that the child will be gluten intolerant is reduced. At no later than six months, and no earlier than four months, you should start giving the infant some gluten-containing foods… For example, you can let the infant have a bite of white bread or crackers or a small spoon of hot cereal or wheat-based formula a couple of times a week… After six months gradually increase the amount. 

This assertive advice is unfortunately based only on uncertain statistics from questionnaire studies, i.e. observational studies. Such statistics prove nothing. The guideline-issuing authorities have a troublesome ability to sound certain without enough supporting evidence.

So is the advice above good or bad? Nobody knew before, but now this has finally been tested seriously.

The other week two critical studies were published in the New England Journal of Medicine – the world’s most respected medical science journal. For the first time studies were designed to test whether the advice works. Continue Reading →

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“Giant Leap to Type 1-Diabetes Cure”

diabetes_2936249b

This is cool news. Scientists at Harvard just announced that they have managed to generate insulin-producing cells from human stem cells. This is hailed as a step towards a cure for type 1-diabetes:

BBC: ‘Giant leap’ to type 1-diabetes cure

Harvard: Giant leap against diabetes

Unfortunately, there are a couple of steps remaining to make it possible to cure people with type 1-diabetes. The cells need to be protected against the immune system, and would in reality act as a transplanted organ. This would require a life-long need for medicating with immunosuppressants for it to work – unless in the future, the cells can be made from the patient’s own stem cells.

Even in this the best case scenario, the immunosuppressing treatment might be required for a long-term effect, as type 1-diabetics also produce antibodies against insulin-producing cells, which is what triggers the disease in the first place.

There are also plans for trying to “encapsulate” the cells to protect them from the immune system without the need for medication. If this will work is not yet clear.

Finally, this is long-term a potential cure for just type 1-diabetes, which “only” one of ten diabetics in the world suffer from. Type 2 is a lot more common and is not caused by a lack of insulin-producing cells.

But still – potentially a big step towards being an important treatment consideration in the future. Continue Reading →

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