Do You Want a Secret Look at the Major New Diet Doctor Project?

We have a major new project going on here at Diet Doctor.com. We’re getting ready to launch it but there are still a few details to fix.

We’re ready for some testing though. Do you want to be one of the first people to check it out? Then enter your e-mail here and you’ll get an invitation soon.

Update: Enrollment is now closed after more than 500 people signed up.

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“I Feel Great and Strong and Life is Good”

Before and after

Before and after

What a change!

Ingegerd Salomonsson has an experience that many others share: Her obesity was associated with pregnancies. When she was young she was lean, but during three pregnancies she gained a lot of weight. More than most. She ended up weighing 309 lbs (140 kg) and probably also had type 2 diabetes.

After trying to lose weight in many ways, as early as in the 80’s she was given the opportunity to undergo weight-loss surgery (gastric banding). She lost a lot of weight – but over the years it came back. A second weight-loss surgery (gastric bypass) produced weight loss again – but again the weight began to creep back up over the years.

What do you do when not even two weight-loss surgeries solve your weight problems?

Finally Ingegerd found what worked for her – without new surgeries or medications. A lifestyle change brought all her health markers up to perfect and her weight fell back to where it was when she was young. And even though this lifestyle change is controversial her doctor approves and thinks she should continue.

Here’s her story: Continue Reading →

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How to Tailor Your Fitness Routine if You’re Overweight or Suffer from Metabolic Syndrome

Training Overweight

The hard way

Do you want to exercise to lose weight? Or to control diabetes? Then you should know there’s a difficult way… And an efficient way. And they’re complete opposites.

The difficult and inefficient way? That’s trying to follow the failed advice of just moving around more while eating less. That rarely works in practice. Following that advice makes you hungry and tired, and demands unyielding willpower every day for the rest of your life. It’s the hard way.

The smart and efficient way? Let our expert guide you through the maze of exercise tips and routines.

Jonas Bergqvist is a licensed physical therapist who’s worked with dietary, exercise and lifestyle coaching for many years. He currently runs a combined health and education centre with courses in, among other things, LCHF and paleo dietary advice. He’s also a popular diet guru and has written several diet and exercise books, including (in Swedish) “LCHF and Exercise”.

Now it’s time for his best advice on the topic of exercise for weight loss and improved health:

Guest Post

Jonas BergqvistThis second exercise-themed post is going to deal with the issue of how best to exercise if you’re overweight or are suffering from metabolic syndrome.

It should be stated immediately that any kind of exercise is better than no exercise. Also, the more the better, if you keep it at an amateur level. So the first step is all about establishing regular exercise sessions. It’s the accumulated volume of exercise over time that brings health benefits, not the effect of single workouts. However, that’s not to say that the individual workouts can be any old way you feel like. You can choose to exercise more or less effectively, and that’s what this post is all about. Continue Reading →

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“I Ignored the American Diabetes Association and the Dietitians”

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After

Howard decided to ignore the advice on a high-carb diet to treat his type 2 diabetes. Here’s what happened when he did the opposite instead:

The Email

In Nov 2013, my blood sugar went out of wack with an HbA1C of 16%. A friend steered me to your site. I ignored the American Diabetes Association and the dietitians with their high carb, low fat, reduced calorie intake diets. I went on a no sugar minimal carb intake (no grains, potatoes, rice, pasta, etc.). In nine months my HbA1C was down to 5.6% with the side effects of lost 55 pounds (25 kg), triglycerides dropped from 197 to 67 (2.2–0.76 mmol/l), HDL rose from 34 to 76 (0.88–1.96 mmol/l) without meds. My doctor is not a full believer so has put me on one 500 mg Metformin a day. No before, only the after.

Congratulations Howard! Continue Reading →

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Should You Be on Statins?

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Dr. Anders Tengblad

Should you be on a cholesterol-lowering medication, a so called statin? This is much debated and this will likely be a controversial post.

Some claim that nobody should take such drugs, that they cause lots of side effects and no benefits, as heart disease “has nothing to do with cholesterol”.

Others claim that most people (even healthy people) should take statins daily to prevent heart disease, as they are “effective and almost free of side effects.” Many doctors prescribe statins to all their patients with a cholesterol level above some arbitrary number. For example a total cholesterol above 200 mg/dl (5 mmol/l), which most people have.

Pros and Cons

The truth is of course somewhere between these extreme alternatives. Statins have been showed to reduce the risk of heart disease, especially in people who already suffer from heart disease. However, they also carry a significant risk of side effects, such as an increased risk of diabetes, muscle aches, weakness, increased fatigue and actually a slightly lowered IQ, etc.

So who could benefit from this medication? Should you be on it? New guidelines – a step in the right direction – have been issued from the Swedish Medical Products Agency.

Here’s a sensible guest post on the subject by Dr. Anders Tengblad:

Guest Post

tengblad-pres2New guidelines on preventative treatment with drugs have been issued from the Swedish Medical Products Agency. The guidelines are also included in the new diabetes guidelines. If you’re 100% opposed to taking medication to prevent disease, you will of course not like these guidelines. Personally, I think the guidelines are good. Focus is moved from target levels to treating the total risk. Continue Reading →

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