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New Study: Improved Diabetes Control With a Low-Carb Diet

New Australian research finds that people with type 2 diabetes control their disease much better on a low-carb diet.

“The research results are ground breaking,” Associate Professor Grant Brinkworth, principal research scientist at the CSIRO said.

“Health professionals have been divided over the best dietary approach for managing type 2 diabetes, and the ongoing uncertainty is a hotly debated topic amongst clinicians and researchers.

“The most amazing benefit of the low carbohydrate diet was the reduction in the patient’s medication levels, which was more than double the amount than the volunteers following the lifestyle program with the high-carbohydrate diet plan.

“Some of the participants managed to cease their medications altogether, and many described the study as life changing.

CSIRO: Improved Diabetes Control with New Diet

The question is, why is anybody still surprised? Should we not already know this by now?

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LCHF Treatment of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

LCHF Treatment of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome – Eric Westman4.9 out of 5 stars5 star94%4 star5%3 star0%2 star0%1 star0%18 ratings181:04:37


Do you want to know more about low-carb, high-fat diets? One of the world’s leading experts, Dr. Eric Westman, gave two presentations at the LCHF convention last year.

In the first one he teaches us the practical aspects of how to do a low-carb diet – just like he teaches his patients. Watch it here

In this second talk – pictured above – he tells the story of how he, as a doctor, got interested when his patients started losing weight on low carb. Then he learned more and published his own studies on it. This is a talk for people who want to understand how low carb works.

Watch the full presentation

You can buy access to the entire LCHF convention for $49 dollars from the organizers. Or you can watch this talk on our member pages:

Watch the presentation on the member pages

Sign up for a free membership trial in a minute and you can see it instantly – as well as many other video courses, movies, interviews, presentations, Q&A with experts, etc.

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The Biggest Fears on Low Carb – and the Solutions

What is the biggest fear that people have when starting a low-carb diet?

We recently asked our members this question, and got 826 replies. Here are the results:

 

 

Other answers include some brave people having no fear at all, concerns about safety, losing sports performance as well as the fear of losing too much weight.

So what can be done? Here’s a guide to conquering these fears:  Continue Reading →

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“Low Carb vs. High Carb – My Surprising 24-Day Diabetes Diet Battle”

lowercarbs

What’s the difference between high-carb and lower-carb diets for someone with type 1 diabetes? Adam Brown decided to test it, with interesting results.

He started out with his usual diet: 12 days of lower-carb, mostly from vegetables, nuts, seeds and some fruit. Then he switched to a high-carb diet for 12 days, where the carbs came from whole wheat bread, oatmeal, quinoa, wild rice and fruit. No junk food whatsoever.

The result of his experiment surprised him:

I would summarize it like this: high-carb eating felt like highway driving from Los Angeles to San Francisco, alternating between 120 mph and 10 mph. Low-carb eating felt more like driving between 55 and 75 mph. The final averages were the same (65 mph), but the experience was far different in terms of safety and effort.

diaTribe: Low Carb vs. High Carb – My Surprising 24-day Diabetes Diet Battle

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LCHF Advice in 33 Languages – Now Including Chinese

LCHF

Do you want advice on LCHF (low-carb high-fat) in your first language? Or do you want to send it to a friend who doesn’t speak English?

Here’s the page LCHF for beginners in 33 languages! New today: Chinese.

Do you have a translation to an additional language, or do you have a significant improvement of a previous translation? Please email me.

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“Don’t Force the Fat”

A low-carb and high-fat diet does not mean you have to force yourself to eat extra fat when you’re not hungry. That’s just going to slow down weight loss. Here’s a nice post that explains it well:

Low Carb RN: Don’t force the fat

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A Classic Low-Carb Movie: Fat Head

Have you seen the classic low-carb movie Fat Head (2009)? It follows stand-up comedian Tom Naughton as he tries to lose weight on a fast-food diet, to prove Morgan “Super Size Me” Spurlock wrong.

Along the way Naughton realizes that he himself has been wrong in focusing only on calories. So ironically the message of the movie changes a lot from the first to the second half.

You can watch the trailer above. The entire movie is on our member site: Fat Head Directors Cut

As usual you can sign up for a free one month trial of the membership, to see not only this but also many other movies, video courses, interviews, presentations, etc.

More with Tom Naughton

On the member site you can also check out this interview and this presentation I recorded with Tom Naughton earlier this year:

We've Been Pretty Much Lied to for 30-40 Years – Tom Naughton4.5 out of 5 stars5 star79%4 star4%3 star8%2 star0%1 star8%24 ratings2419:59“FAT HEAD KIDS” presentation by Tom Naughton4.6 out of 5 stars5 star71%4 star21%3 star7%2 star0%1 star0%14 ratings1427:41

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In Defense of Low Fat – Denise Minger vs. Dr. Fung

The “magic” theory, à la Minger

Is low fat a great idea? Do you have a few hours to spare? Then check out the new & massively long blog post by the always-entertaining, controversy-seeking and brilliant Denise Minger:

In Defense of Low Fat: A Call for Some Evolution of Thought (Part 1)

The post is a longer and more developed version of her 2014 AHS talk Lessons from the Vegans (worth watching, and it will only take you 30 minutes).

The general idea is that while low carb seems to work great for metabolic problems – like obesity and diabetes type 2 – so too can very low-fat plant-based diets sometimes work fine. Why is that? In Minger’s words it’s because of extreme low-fat “magic”, which presumably is another kind of magic than low-carb magic.

Interesting, but not necessarily true.

Dr. Fung’s reply

Enter Dr. Fung, with a much shorter but still interesting post on the controversy:

Dr. Fung: Thoughts on the Kempner Rice Diet [and the Minger post]

In Dr. Fung’s view the extreme low-fat diets (like the <10% fat rice diet) sometimes work well because you really eat the same amount of carbs but avoid everything else (almost no protein and no fat). This is because all reward from eating disappears, due to the extremely monotonous diet – people only eat when they are truly hungry. The rest of the time they are, in effect, fasting.

My comments and criticism

While I tend to agree with Dr. Fung about most things – and his comments here make a lot of sense – there are also interesting points in Minger’s long post. For example, that the “macronutrient swampland” of Western junk food – high carb, high fat – tend to be where we find massive food reward (think chocolate, ice cream or donuts), leading to overeating. It’s clear that whole-food plant-based diets avoid this problem.

I also have some criticism of Minger’s post. For example she spends tons of time attacking the idea that Ancel Keys started the low-fat movement. This feels very misleading. While it’s certainly true that he did not invent low fat, like Minger says, he was still the dominant figure transforming low fat – earlier a theory that not many people cared about – into officially accepted dogma. Quite a feat.

It’s like Dr. Robert Atkins and low carb. Dr. Atkins took a concept that had already been talked about and tested for over a hundred years – low-carb diets for weight loss – and made it famous and known by everyone. That’s why decades later the word Atkins is still synonymous with low carb. While Dr. Atkins did not invent low carb – not even close – he still had an important role to play. Nobody would seriously argue otherwise.

To summarise I find Minger’s post interesting and – as always – entertaining in her unique way. But I can’t help feel that she’s sometimes seeking controversy more than enlightenment. And there’s no magic in that.

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Peak Yogurt – Get Your TRIPLE Fat Yogurt Here

peak

Do you want an 18% fat yogurt with no added sugar?

If you live in Sweden, like I do, you can just walk into any grocery store and get it. Personally, I’ll have some high-fat yogurt – and bacon & eggs – every weekend morning (I normally skip breakfast on weekdays). It’s a perfect low-carb high-fat start to the day.

In the US it’s apparently really hard to find a high-fat yogurt with no added sugar. This is obviously an unacceptable situation. Fortunately a new startup – Peak Yoghurt – is trying to fix it. Check out their Indiegogo funding campaign here:

Peak Yogurt: Organic Triple Cream Yogurt

Fortunately there’s a massive trend towards higher-fat foods today (as evidenced by the recent Credit Suisse report) so Peak Yogurt should do great. Here’s a new story on the team behind it:

Forbes: Is This The Beginning Of The End For Nonfat Yogurt?

PS

I have no financial or other ties to Peak Yogurt – I just like the idea.

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