Archive | Health problems
left
How to Get Pregnant 23
“I Didn’t Think the Results Would Come This Soon” 11
No more waiting 37
Yet Another Low-Carb Baby – for Free! 15
Insulin, the Obesity Epidemic and a Giant German Baby 42
The Picture That Changed Everything 7
How to Get Pregnant by Avoiding Stress 8
“LCHF Helped Me Get Pregnant!” 3
The Doctor: “Have You Started an LCHF Diet, Or Something?” 30
Should You Supplement Vitamin D During Pregnancy? 9
Expecting our Paleo Baby 63
right

“I Didn’t Think the Results Would Come This Soon”

Before and after

Before and after

I just received an email from Annie, 26, who had been always been overweight. Here’s what happened in just three months on LCHF: Continue Reading →

11

Yet Another Low-Carb Baby – for Free!

iStock_000015563070Small1-800x543

Here’s yet another story about PCOS, LCHF and the joy of having a baby:

Hi!

I want to let you know about something amazing that has happened to me and my spouse. I will try to make the story short. A few years ago, we decided to start trying for a baby. My spouse basically hadn’t had her period, except for a few times when she was 13-14 years old. She was later diagnosed with PCOS.

We went through IVF treatments to get pregnant. It took us more than 4 years before she got pregnant, after a number of failed attempts, with mental and physical challenges. Eventually we had our baby. Overjoyed.

A little while after the baby was born, we both started an LCHF diet. We kept under 10 g carbohydrates per 100 g of food. We started to lose weight and suddenly her period started to work again!! We couldn’t believe it was true?!

After just one attempt, at the time of her second ovulation, she got pregnant again!!! Totally incredible! And suddenly we now have 2 children! And thanks to LCHF we have saved a ton of money, which a new IVF treatment would have cost us!

Please feel free to publish on the blog, however, we would like to remain anonymous.

Thanks for your posts – they are interesting!

Congratulations!

This is not the first time that an LCHF baby comes to this world. It’s becoming quite a common story these days.

PCOS is a common hormone disorder, associated with obesity, that causes irregular periods and difficulties conceiving (and a tendency for acne and excessive hair growth). A low-carb diet is an excellent treatment. Not only may it produce weight loss and reduced symptoms from PCOS. It may also deliver the ultimate prize: a long-awaited baby.

Continue Reading →

15

The Doctor: “Have You Started an LCHF Diet, Or Something?”

doktor-650x398

Many people with obesity or diabetes experience amazing health improvements with fewer carbohydrates in their diets. But you may still feel a little nervous at that follow-up appointment. What will the tests show?

A reader e-mailed me a story about what can happen.

“Have you started an LCHF diet, or something?” was the first thing the doctor said: Continue Reading →

30

The Picture That Changed Everything

Before and after

Before and after

Annelie Löfgren told her story on our Swedish Facebook page:

When I saw the picture to the left I decided that this had gone too far. This was in July 2012.

I’m so happy that I found LCHF. I’m so happy that I gave myself the chance to feel good!

Now I’m 88 lbs (40 kg) lighter since the summer of 2012. I’ve managed to squeeze in a pregnancy and son number three in between too! (A beloved little Theodor, whom in all likelihood wouldn’t exist, had I not found LCHF.)

Now I have the chance to live with them for a longer time! I also have the chance to stay longer in my profession as a hair dresser. Not finished yet, but soon! :)

Congratulations, Annelie! Continue Reading →

7

Should You Supplement Vitamin D During Pregnancy?

iStock_000005885633Small-650x432

Should pregnant women take Vitamin D supplements, and if so, how much?

No other vitamin deficiency is as common during the dark winter months as the sun vitamin. Therefore, supplementing to avoid deficiency during pregnancy makes a lot of sense.

A recent study shows that supplementing Vitamin D reduces the risk of common pregnancy complications, such as high blood sugar and high blood pressure. Despite a very low dose – only 400 IU daily, compared to placebo – there were significantly positive results.

As previous studies have shown the same results (a lower blood sugar, a lower blood pressure, lower insulin levels) from supplementation in non-pregnant people, the results from this study are clearly credible.

What Dose is Appropriate During Pregnancy?

I usually recommend a dosage between 2,000 IU daily (small women) to 5,000 IU (large men) for adults during the dark winter months. For young children 1,000 IU daily may be appropriate.

The above are the doses needed to avoid severe deficiency and where the risk of overdosing hardly exists.

I see no reason for pregnant women to take lower doses than this. The requirement will likely be at least as great during pregnancy. A previous study on 4,000 IU Vitamin D given daily to pregnant women showed, furthermore, that this was completely safe and cut the risk of infections and preterm birth in half.

When my spouse was pregnant she took 4 – 5,000 IU Vitamin D daily. Since birth, my daughter Klara has received 1,000 IU Vitamin D drops daily. She couldn’t be healthier or more perfect (of course). She’s also the least autistic child I know.

Do you have an interesting experience with Vitamin D supplementation?

Earlier about vitamin D

9

Insulin, the Obesity Epidemic and a Giant German Baby

Jasleen

The obesity epidemic starts early in life: Germany has a new record for “heaviest baby”: 13,5 pound Jasleen. She was delivered without the help of a C-section.

The cause of heavy babies is often maternal obesity and gestational diabetes – conditions with abnormally high insulin levels. Insulin is a fat-storing growth hormone that does not just affect the mother but also the unborn child. The mother to Jasleen, not surprisingly, had gestational diabetes.

The most common cause of abnormally high insulin levels resulting in obesity and diabetes (and heavy babies) is eating excess carbs.

The smartest way to avoid these things is to avoid eating excess carbs. Why? A low-carb diet is an effective way to lower insulin levels. And normalizing the fat-storing hormone insulin tends to normalize weight for most people (and any present unborn babies).

So here’s another reason to do low carb: You won’t have to deliver a 13,5 pound baby. Continue Reading →

42

“LCHF Helped Me Get Pregnant!”

pcos

Isabelle Nelson is another woman who struggled in vain to get pregnant, due to the common hormonal imbalance PCOS. But after adopting a LCHF diet and losing 35 lbs in two months what so often happens happened:

Just for fun, she took a pregnancy test. The test showed that she was pregnant.

- I did not believe it. I ran to show my husband, who did not believe it either. I guess it was at the first midwife appointment that I began to understand. I was in a state of euphoria, says Isabelle Nelson.

Previously on PCOS

The whole story in a Swedish paper. Translation by Google: Continue Reading →

3

How to Get Pregnant by Avoiding Stress

The first part of my interview with low carb expert dr Michael D. Fox was quite well received. Here’s one comment on YouTube:

I’ve listened to a lot of low carb videos and podcasts and this is one of the best.

Here’s the second and final part of the interview. And the topic is not low carb. There’s another thing that impacts the health and fertility of a lot of people: Stress. What a lot of people believe is healthy – running more and eating less – may actually damage their health. And their chances of getting pregnant.

The doctor’s solution may seem weird. Run less, eat more!

 Watch part one

8

How to Get Pregnant

Can you increase your chances of getting pregnant by avoiding excess carbs? It’s still highly controversial, but according to fertility specialist dr Michael D. Fox the answer is definitely yes.

The most common cause of infertility today (before menopause) is PCOS or Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. This is a hormonal disturbance closely related to metabolic syndrome. Women with PCOS often struggle with their weight and may have acne and a tendency towards excess facial hair. They also often have irregular cycles, longer than 28 days.

Not surprisingly eating a low carb high fat diet can work wonders for infertility due to PCOS, like for other similar metabolic conditions (e.g. obesity, type 2 diabetes).

There are a lot of “low carb babies” by now (I’ve got one too). And dr Michael D. Fox has a fascinating tale to tell for anyone interested in healthy food and pregnancy. Here’s my interview with him from the recent Low Carb Cruise.

Do you know a couple struggling to get pregnant? Perhaps you can help out by telling them about this.

Dr. Fox’s clinic website

23

No more waiting

Yesterday the lovely girl Klara was born, 3610 grams heavy and 51 cm tall*. Everybody is feeling fine and in my opinion she is the world’s most amazing baby.

Here’s another picture: Continue Reading →

37