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Can a Ketogenic Diet Treat Cancer?


4.4 out of 5 stars5 star55%4 star27%3 star16%2 star0%1 star0%18 ratings1,443 viewsCan a ketogenic diet treat cancer? And could a low-carb diet over the long term reduce the risk of ever getting cancer?

Here’s a segment of my earlier interview with the cancer researcher Professor Eugene J. Fine. Continue Reading →

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Why Low Carb Should Not Be High Protein


4.3 out of 5 stars5 star70%4 star9%3 star9%2 star3%1 star7%64 ratings2,586 viewsWhy are all good low-carb diets high in fat, like an LCHF diet, and not high in protein?

Could excessive protein in the diet be a problem for aging and cancer?

Dr. Ron Rosedale’s has been talking about this for a long time. Here’s his highly interesting recent presentation from the Low Carb Vail conference. Watch part of it above.

Watch it

You can watch the whole presentation on our member site:

Protein Intake – Effects on Longevity, Aging and Cancer – Full presentation

Start your free membership trial to watch it instantly – as well as video courses, movies, interviews, more presentations, Q&A with experts, etc.

Continue Reading →

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Could Protein be a Problem for Aging and Cancer?

Protein Intake – Effects on  Aging, Longevity and Cancer – Dr. Ron Rosedale4.3 out of 5 stars5 star70%4 star9%3 star9%2 star3%1 star7%64 ratings6431:12


Could excessive protein in the diet be a problem for aging and cancer?

Here’s a very controversial presentation that I found fascinating. It’s Dr. Ron Rosedale’s presentation on the importance of protein restriction for health, recorded at the recent Low Carb Vail Conference.

This – should it be true – is just one of the reasons a proper low-carb diet should primarily be higher in fat, and contain only moderate amounts of protein. A low-carb, high-fat diet.

Obviously the body needs protein – it’s an essential nutrient – but there’s no need to eat more protein than necessary to feel and perform at our best.

Watch it

You can watch the full presentation on our member site:

Protein Intake – Effects on Aging, Longevity and Cancer – Dr. Ron Rosedale

Start your free membership trial to watch it instantly – as well as video courses, movies, interviews, more presentations, Q&A with experts, etc.

Continue Reading →

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Are Carbs the New Cigarettes?

bread_cigs

Sugar is the new tobacco, at least in the media. Here’s another example. A new study finds that people eating a diet with a high glycemic index – carbs that rapidly elevate blood sugar – have an elevated risk of lung cancer.

Obviously this is only based on statistics and can’t prove that bad carbs cause lung cancer. But if bad carbs can cause obesity and diabetes, why not cancer too?

Daily Mail: Are Carbs the New Cigarettes? White Bread, Bagels and Rice ‘Increase the Risk of Lung Cancer by 49%’, Experts Warn

Science Daily: Dietary glycemic index linked to lung cancer risk in select populations

Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention: Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Lung Cancer Risk in Non-Hispanic Whites

Continue Reading →

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Diet Pepsi May Cause Cancer – Consumer Watchdog Downgrades it from “Caution” to “Avoid”

Can Diet Pepsi cause cancer? Possibly. It contains the commonly used sweetener Sucralose. A new study shows that this sweetener causes leukemia and related blood cancers in mice, when they consume it long term. Nobody can know for sure if this means some people drinking Pepsi will end up with leukemia, but it’s quite possible.

The findings caused the consumer watchdog CSPI (known for occasionally being very wrong) to downgrade Sucralose from “caution” to “avoid”.

CSPI: CSPI Downgrades Sucralose from “Caution” to “Avoid”

Pepsi must be disappointed. It’s just been 6 months since they changed ingredients from the artificial sweetener Aspartame to Sucralose, launching the “new diet Pepsi“, due to health concerns over Aspartame.

The problem with sweeteners

Other negative effects of artificial sweeteners include making it harder to lose weight, disturbing the gut flora and raising blood sugar.

Of course, diet sodas are still preferable to the sugar-bomb real thing – especially when it comes to weight and metabolic disease.

Massively better options include water, coffee or tea.

Continue Reading →

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The Doctor’s Demand Was Crystal Clear – Lose at Least 35 Pounds!

Before and after

Before and after

Alma had to surgically remove one of her breasts after a breast cancer a couple of years ago. In order to qualify for a breast reconstruction the doctor had a tough demand; she had to lose at least 35 pounds!

By pure coincidence she heard of LCHF, this was back in august 2011, and she immediately took up her new eating habits. Here’s what happened. Continue Reading →

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Vegetables Proven to Cause Cancer

Cancer-causing vegetables

Cancer-causing vegetables

Vegetables have been proven to cause cancer. In fact vegetable consumption causes more cancer than any other lifestyle factor in the world.

I’m not kidding. It’s a simple fact.

And it’s not just cancer, it’s heart disease too – in fact vegetables cause 1 in 5 deaths in the US, according to the American Cancer Society, or 480,000 early deaths per year.

Consuming vegetables causes orders of magnitude more deaths than consuming processed meat. This despite yesterday’s breathless headlines, after the WHO declared that eating processed meats (e.g. smoked meats) can increase the risk of colon cancer by a comparatively tiny 20%.

How vegetables can cause cancer

However – and this is crucial – vegetables will only kill you if you prepare them in a dangerous way. In its raw form the tobacco plant is completely benign, possibly even healthy to eat. But if you burn the tobacco vegetable and inhale the smoke… as with cigarettes… it’s VERY bad for you.

Back to the meat

This gives a much needed perspective to yesterday’s cancer alarm. Because it’s not all meat that potentially may contain dangerous substances. It’s processed meat, smoked meat, and possibly even red meat – meat that’s often prepared at high temperatures.

These really high temperatures can produce cancer-causing substances in both vegetables and meat. But of the two, the vegetables (smoking) is by far the worst. The risk increase from eating bacon every day is tiny in comparison:

The Guardian: Meat and tobacco: the difference between risk and strength of evidence

A lot of people in the low-carb community go so far as to completely disregard the processed-meat alarm:

ZoeHarcombe: World Health Organisation, meat & cancer

I don’t think we should ignore this alarm, even if the risk increase is small. It’s still likely true, it makes perfect sense.

If you want to be live a healthy life preferably don’t eat blackened meat, and go easy on the bacon. And don’t smoke vegetables.

Continue Reading →

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Can Processed Meat Increase the Risk of Colon Cancer, as WHO Will Claim?

Not the best for your colon?

Not the best for your colon?

The WHO will soon declare that processed meat can increase the risk of colon cancer, according to many papers:

So are they right that there is a connection between processed meat and colon cancer? Yes, probably. I wrote about this in detail seven months ago:

Why Do Meat Eaters Get Colon Cancer More Often?

However, the media frenzy with comparisons to smoking is misguided. Eating plenty of processed meat is associated with about a 20% increased risk of colon cancer. Smoking is associated with a 1,000%+ increased risk of lung cancer, as well as an increased risk of many other cancers. 20% is not 1,000%.

There’s a reason why it took about fifteen minutes to prove the correlation between smoking and lung cancer way back in the 1950s, while the correlation between processed meat and colon cancer is arguably still controversial. The risk increase is just tiny in comparison.

More details and advice in the earlier post: Why Do Meat Eaters Get Colon Cancer More Often?

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A HIGHER Fat Mediterranean Diet Reduces Breast Cancer Risk By 62%

Mediterranean Diet

Do you want to avoid breast cancer? Then eat a higher-fat diet.

A new study published yesterday looks at the PREDIMED trial where participants either got a low-fat diet (ouch!) or a higher-fat Mediterranean diet (with plenty of extra nuts or olive oil). After five years the risk of breast cancer was much higher in the group told to eat a low-fat diet. The higher-fat Mediterranean diet apparently protected against cancer.

Media

LATimes: Diet heavy on olive oil cuts breast cancer risk by 62%, study says

The Graph

Here’s the graph over the number of people who got breast cancer in the three groups. “Control” is the low-fat diet, the other two are Mediterranean diets with extra nuts or extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO).

chart

Comment

A low-fat diet may promote cancer. Very likely the cause could be that low-fat diets are higher in carbs, increasing blood glucose and the hormone insulin, which drives cell proliferation.

This of course completely contradicts the old and failed idea that low-fat diets are supposed to be healthy. This means a lot of cognitive dissonance for people who still believe in low fat. It’s possible to see that in the discussions of a possible mechanism with magic cancer-protecting substances in olive oil.

It’s just like the French Paradox. They traditionally ate loads of fat and were very heart healthy. So people said it must be due to magic heart-protecting substances in red wine. Yeah right.

Likely this awkward antioxidant/polyphenol speculation is 99% pure BS. There’s a much simpler and more likely explanation.

Natural fat (like olive oil) is good for us – whether we’re talking about heart health, cancer or weight management. And too much refined carbs, especially white flour and pure sugar, is really bad.

Earlier

Here’s earlier super-exciting findings from the PREDIMED trial:

More on Mediterranean diets:

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Why Do Meat Eaters Get Colon Cancer More Often?

Not the best for your colon?

Not the best for your colon?

This post may be controversial – like swearing in the church of low-carb.

Is it unsafe to eat meat? Despite the scare propaganda the answer seems to be no. Meat is a nutritious and great food that humans have always eaten.

Warnings in the media are usually based on extremely uncertain studies – statistics from food questionnaires, where people who eat more meat also smoke more, eat more junk food, exercise less and so forth. Even with this unfair comparison the differences between meat eaters and non-meat eaters are usually small – and sometimes they point in the opposite direction.

In Asia, for example a review of all studies has shown that Asian meat eaters are healthier than non-meat eaters. Asians with a vegetarian orientation seem to get more heart disease and more cancer.

In summary, meat seems to be generally healthy, nutritious and great food. But there’s one exception.

The Exception

The exception, the area that deserves to be taken quite seriously – is the risk of colorectal cancer. For some reason studies repeatedly show that people who eat red – mainly processed – meat specifically get more colon cancer.

The increase in risk for colorectal cancer in people who eat a lot of meat is generally low, around 20%. This can be compared with a massive 1,000% increase of risk for lung cancer for smokers. But even if the increase in risk is small, it’s been shown so often and so consistently that it probably is real.

Two days ago another study was published showing a slightly smaller risk for colorectal cancer in vegetarians. Why does red (processed) meat seem to slightly increase the risk of colorectal cancer? Continue Reading →

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