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What Do Overweight and Obese People Eat?

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Here’s what a group of mostly overweight or obese people are eating (via Dr. Ted Naiman).

Does it suggest anything to you?

By the way, here’s the average daily intake in the US: Continue Reading →

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Chinese Balanced Diet Guideline: 250-400 g Carbs

With a balanced diet guide from the Chinese Nutrition Society coming in at 250 – 400 gram carbs per day (source) it’s perhaps not surprising that China is now suffering a diabetes explosion.

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Top 10 Fattest Countries in the World – 2016 List

Here’s the top 10 fattest countries in the world in 2016. The top of the list might surprise you:

Gazette Review: Top 10 Fattest Countries in the World – 2016 List

The number one country is Kuwait and number 2 is Saudi Arabia, and the list contains several other Muslim countries with hot climates. So why?

There’s a simple possible explanation. When it’s hot you need to drink a lot. And if you’re Muslim you’re not likely to drink alcohol. So what will it be? For many people it’s soda or other sugary drinks. The number one thing that makes people fat.

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Waist Size Increasing in Teens, Even as Obesity Rates Stabilize

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According to a new study, the average waist size is increasing in U.S. teens, even as obesity rates possibly stabilize.

The problem? Youth seem to be gaining fat and losing muscle.

Pediatric Obesity: Changes in Pediatric Waist Circumference Percentiles Despite Reported Pediatric Weight Stabilization in the United States

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Malnutrition and Obesity Common in the World – at the Same Time!

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Is it possible to be malnourished, anemic and obese at the same time? The answer is a definite yes according to the Global Nutrition Report.

How can obesity and malnourishment be common at the same time? The answer is that people in poorer countries to a large degree rely on cheap carbs drained of all nutrients. And more ironically – these foods are often even recommended.

We need to stop promoting bad carbs (like bread) as health foods and instead recommend higher quality foods to people who need them – like meat, natural fats and vegetables.

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“The Government’s Carb-Heavy Healthy Eating Guide Could Be CAUSING Obesity”

eatwellplate2In March the latest version of the official UK Eatwell Guide was publicized, recommending people to base their meals on bread, rice, pasta and potatoes. Dietary expert Dr. Zoe Harcombe has this to say:

I would call this the “EatBadly” plate rather than the “EatWell” plate.

The Government’s most recent recommendations could lead to both weight gain and type 2 diabetes according to Dr. Harcombe. And she points out that there is no credible evidence supporting the Eatwell Guide.

On a side note almost half of the reference group that assisted in designing the graphic for the Eatwell plate were representatives of the food industry.

MailOnline: The Government’s carb-heavy healthy eating guide could be CAUSING obesity and type 2 diabetes, nutritionist claims

Prima: Healthy eating guidelines come under fire again

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Have Obesity-Related Diseases Begun to Shorten Life Expectancy in the US?

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Heading for a shorter life?

Have we reached an turning point in life expectancy due to the obesity epidemic? Professor David S. Ludwig at Harvard Medical School believes so, after reviewing recent statistics.

JAMA: Lifespan Weighted Down by Diet

Since children and adolescents are at much greater risk of developing modern day diseases such as obesity early on in their lives, even medical advancement will perhaps not ensure that coming generations live longer. They could be the first generation to have lower life expectancies than their parents.

Ludwig suggests that the public health approach towards obesity has been massively wrong, and that it has even contributed to the epidemic. The standard advice – “eat less and run more” – hasn’t worked, since it can lower our metabolism and increase our hunger.

So what’s Ludwig’s suggested alternative? By instead working with our biology and avoiding refined carbohydrates, we might avoid obesity and related diseases. And this could help our children live longer lives.

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Coffee Break at the European Obesity Summit

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People at obesity conferences are still clueless about their own subject. Here’s another example, from the recent European Obesity Summit (source).

Vanilla donuts? At an obesity conference? In what way is that different from handing out cigarettes at a cancer conference?

The worst thing is that this is par for the course. Most obesity experts are simply clueless about the true causes of obesity. Because a calorie is not a calorie. And eating vanilla donuts is not the same thing as eating broccoli.

Here are a few earlier, even scarier, examples of ignorance: Continue Reading →

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Baby Boomers Will Become Sicker Seniors Than Earlier Generations

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This is simply not OK:

The next generation of senior citizens will be sicker and costlier to the health care system over the next 14 years than previous generations, according to a new report from the United Health Foundation. We’re talking about you, baby boomers.

NPR: Baby Boomers Will Become Sicker Seniors Than Earlier Generations

There is no good reason why people should get more obese and diabetic. We have the knowledge to fix this problem, so let’s do it.

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Massive Headlines in the UK: Eat More Fat

Most of what we’ve been told about healthy eating is wrong – and we should be eating more fat. This according to a new report from a UK health charity. Clearly they are right.

The report resulted in lots of massive headlines in the UK today:

Learn more

Learn more about the Public Health Collaboration and their report here:

PHCUK.org

PHC UK: Eat Fat, Cut The Carbs and Avoid Snacking To Reverse Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes

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