Archive | Health problems

“This Is the Happiest, Healthiest and Most Energetic I Have Ever Been”

Before and after

Before and after

This is fantastic! I got an email from Derek in Australia with a husband and wife success story. The journey includes massive weight loss and numerous health benefits, including reversing infertility – and avoiding weight-loss surgery.

Derek began his LCHF journey without his wife’s support, and she was confused and afraid of the changes she started to see in him. After three months curiosity took over: Continue Reading →

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“Our Diabetes Clinic Wouldn’t Listen, But Reported Me to the Authorities”

A 9-year old is firmly advised to eat half a pound of root vegetables per meal for the brain to work

9-year-old is firmly advised to eat a pound of root vegetables per meal for the brain to work

Diabetics are routinely exposed to neglect, because of old ingrained dogmas on how they need to eat. Diabetics are getting sicker unnecessarily, and often often their attempts to improve their health are met by opposition from health-care professionals.

The following example is one of the worst I’ve encountered. A mother managed to help her 9-year-old son with type 1 diabetes to become healthier and feel better by eating fewer  carbohydrates. The result of the mother helping her child? The diabetes clinic reported her to the authorities!

However, the report was soon abandoned – because everyone involved, including school health professionals, noticed that the child was doing much better than before – but the diabetes clinic continues to put up resistance.

Recently, the diabetes clinic sent a letter to the school, stating that the child needs to eat at least a pound of root vegetables per meal in order to “ensure that enough glucose reaches the brain”. The fact that the child was already feeling better than ever before doesn’t seem to matter. Here’s the full translation of the letter, signed by a dietitian at the clinic:

“The recommended intake of carbohydrates at lunch is no less than 30 g (1 oz).

In order to ensure that enough glucose reaches brain cells and other body tissues, a minimum of 30 g of carbohydrates is required at lunch.

If carbohydrate intake has to be in the form of root vegetables, then 300–700 g (about a pound) is required to get the carbohydrate intake up to 30 g (1 oz).”

This is a story from Sweden in the year 2014. A story that an appropriate investigative TV show should dig in to: Continue Reading →

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“Overall, I Now Have a Completely New Life”

P-O Heidling

P-O Heidling

P-O Heidling from Linköping, Sweden, has had type 1 diabetes since childhood. Despite being a “very good” patient, his blood sugar levels increased with the years. He was tired constantly and many more health problems started to sneak up on him.

He emailed me about what happened when he – despite resistance from health care professionals – started eating LCHF about five years ago.

Here’s his story: Continue Reading →

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LCHF on Australia’s Biggest Science Show!

Catalyst

Things are happening! The other day an excellent TV show aired about the benefits of LCHF-like food. This on Australia’s biggest science show, Catalyst.

The show is not only about how LCHF may reduce appetite, produce weight loss without hunger or improve diabetes. It also goes into how this kind of food may help some top athletes to better performance.

Watch the episode for free online:

Catalyst: Low-carb diet: fat or fiction? (30 minutes long)

The show features professor Tim Noakes and professor Steve Phinney. Continue Reading →

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Carb-Loaded: the Best Low-Carb Movie Ever?

This might be the best low-carb movie ever. It’s just been released and you can watch it online:

Watch Carb-Loaded

Back in August 2013 the readers of this blog (and its Swedish cousin) helped kickstart production of Carb-Loaded.

The creators, Lathe Poland and Eric Carlsen, have since done a terrific job of interviewing almost everyone in the low-carb community – like professor Tim Noakes, Gary Taubes et al (and me) – plus many other experts in food and nutrition, like Drs. David Katz, Marion Nestle and Yoni Freedhoff.

They’ve done loads of interviews, but that’s not what’s most impressive about this movie. What’s most impressive is how funny it is. I’ve basically heard all the information covered before, but I still found myself sitting with a silly grin on my face through much of the movie.

There’s some pretty impressive animation work lightening up the film too. But my favorite is the obnoxious doctor who sort of represents the conventional “wisdom” of our time. Reportedly the character was inspired by “dr Spaceman” in the TV series 30 Rock – if you’ve seen him you know what to expect.

Here’s a sneak peek of Carb-Loaded:

Did you like that? Check out the whole movie online here:

Watch Carb-Loaded

If you’d rather order a physical DVD or Blu-Ray disc, or if you want to check out other Carb-Loaded merchandise (like T-shirts) have a look at their online store. I you’d like, you can use the coupon code “DIETDOCTOR” for a 25% discount.

What do you think about the movie?

Note: I have no financial interests in the video streaming or the merchandise above.

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“Giant Leap to Type 1-Diabetes Cure”

diabetes_2936249b

This is cool news. Scientists at Harvard just announced that they have managed to generate insulin-producing cells from human stem cells. This is hailed as a step towards a cure for type 1-diabetes:

BBC: ‘Giant leap’ to type 1-diabetes cure

Harvard: Giant leap against diabetes

Unfortunately, there are a couple of steps remaining to make it possible to cure people with type 1-diabetes. The cells need to be protected against the immune system, and would in reality act as a transplanted organ. This would require a life-long need for medicating with immunosuppressants for it to work – unless in the future, the cells can be made from the patient’s own stem cells.

Even in this the best case scenario, the immunosuppressing treatment might be required for a long-term effect, as type 1-diabetics also produce antibodies against insulin-producing cells, which is what triggers the disease in the first place.

There are also plans for trying to “encapsulate” the cells to protect them from the immune system without the need for medication. If this will work is not yet clear.

Finally, this is long-term a potential cure for just type 1-diabetes, which “only” one of ten diabetics in the world suffer from. Type 2 is a lot more common and is not caused by a lack of insulin-producing cells.

But still – potentially a big step towards being an important treatment consideration in the future. Continue Reading →

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