Butter shortage in Sweden

Swedish butter

The Swedish Low Carb High Fat revolution keeps advancing. Newspapers are now reporting on a shortage of butter in Sweden that will probably last for the rest of the year. Production can’t keep up with the rising demand.

This is good news. At least as long as I still have butter in my own refrigerator.

LCHF for beginners

More about the free updates that people get.

More

left
Do You Want to Watch the Excellent Obesity Documentary FED UP? 41
No More Than Seven Months? 35
Your iPhone Gives You Cancer – But Protects You From Malaria! 8
TIME: Eat Butter. Scientists Labeled Fat the Enemy. Why They Were Wrong. 84
Can Giving Up Grains Cause Cancer? 26
Saturated Fat Completely Safe According to New Big Review of All Science! 34
“Butter Better than Vegetable Oils” 36
Lose Weight by Achieving Optimal Ketosis 170
“Fat Is In, Sugar Is Out” 26
Number of Weight-Loss Surgeries Continues to Decline in Sweden! 28
Is It Dangerous to Eat Meat Before Age 65? 48
Did Pfizer Conceal That Statins Can Cause Diabetes? 21
right

19 Comments

  1. Erik
    For the first time in my life I couldn't find any butter at my supermarket yesterday! The store shelves was cleaned out. However, I was lucky and got 2 package of "Bregott" butter blend (butter mixed with canola oil).
  2. Wow! I wish we had this "problem" in America. There's more margarine than butter on store shelves.
  3. Waeoo
    Same in Malmö, when I was at ICA Maxi Supermarket, shortage on alot of diffrent butter.
  4. FrankG
    @Erik you might rethink Canola oil after watching this video about how it is made... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omjWmLG0EAs

    Even years ago I had a hunch that butter was better... I never really liked it margarine even before I understood why.

  5. Funderaren
    You learn something new everyday. Apperently Canola oil is just a certain type of Rapeseed oil. I dont think they use that type in Bregott.
  6. nak
    Same good news in Finland but not yet that good. Some stores usually have shortage in butter and 10% fat no-sugar yoghurt (turkish/greek yoghurt). A lot of fatty products are also exported to Russia. They don't buy any low-fat Finnish products but we could export all high fat products we can produce.

    Also Lidl have done miracles to us. We really have only two stores, K and S that shares the market (80% of all groceries). So the prices are very high, but Lidl came few years back and it sells also Finnish products for reasonable price. Also very high quality import goods, like vegetables and fish. Take a visit to Lidl some day if wandering nearby.

  7. nak
  8. moreporkplease
    I'm sure the Danes will be happy to ship you more Lurpak? :)
  9. Galina L.
    During my visit to Russia it was a pleasure to buy full-fat products like 35% cream, 30% sour-cream, some of it from Finland. Unfortunately, low-fat, whole grain propaganda is on the rise and now you can see fat children on streets, rarely, not like in USA, but they are there now.
  10. Bregott is actually 2/3 butter and 1/3 Canola oil. We Swedes still call it by its origianal name "rapeseed oil", a name that for some reason North Americans have abandoned :-)
    Still it´s not the GMO Canola oil in Bregott. I will sooner or later make a posting on lchf.com about this "clash of civilisations" were LCHF Swedes look at rapeseed oil as an accepteble compromise in daily life but low carb and paleo Americans have developted a Canola oil phobia that is largely unfounded.

    Canola oil has a lot more resemblance to olive oil (hailed by the US LC and Paleo community) beeing dominated by monounsatureted fats. And it has a far better omega6/omega3 ratio than most other vegetable oils. So I am happy to live in Sweden were most of the mayonaise is made out of rapeseed instead of corn oil or soybean oil. And looking at the bigger picture...growing rapeseed instaed of corn and soy means the fat in Swedish meat and poultry has a far better omega ratio.

  11. Dr J
    Andreas,

    I hope the dairy producers are giving you due credit for that change!

    Jay

  12. Richard
    #10, there is more to it than the n6/n3 ratio though. Olive oil is not pure fat, it has other constituents that counteract the oxidative stress of the PUFAs, and can decrease inflammation. Is that the case for the highly refined canola oil?
  13. Dr J,
    I'm happy to do what I can for them free of charge. :)

    Although I'm not sure they are that happy. Low fat dairy means you can sell the milk twice!

  14. FrankG
    @Per #10 - Thanks for the clarification. Living in N America I had wondered about Doctor Andreas listing Canola as a good option on his LCHF For Beginners page.

    This was my original source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canola

    I tend to lean towards Paleo as the default way of eating, in the midst of often contradictory advice from the"experts" -- why reinvent the wheel? So I am cautious in regards any recently developed foodstuff, especially in this case, as I see no need for a vegetable oil of any kind in my pantry. If I ever do need one I'd be interested to read your blog on the Swedish version of Canola as an option.

    Meantime I hope that the distinction between these varieties is made clear and stays clear in the future. Can you be sure which type you are eating?

    BTW the video I linked above was not made by a canola-phobic LCHF or Paleo crowd but simply a TV documentary called "How It Is Made"

  15. #12, #14
    Canola/rapeseed is seen as an "acceptable" option rather then "optimal" one by swedish LCHFers. It is after all a processed food, just like bacon and sausage...and as they say: "Thoose who like sausages and respect the laws should not watch the making of either"

    There are several brands of cold pressed canola sold here (has a nice nutty taste) and it has more of antioxidants than the highly processed version portraid in that video.

    There is no special swedish variety of Canola. It's the same plant but GMO varieties are not allowed to be grown in Sweden (The only GMO-plant allowed in Sweden is a potatoe grown to produce industrial starch and not ment for human consumtion).

  16. JAUS
    I avoid canola oil, it was not traditionally eaten here in Sweden either because it was toxic. It was primary used as a lubricant. It wasn't until the 1970-ties that a modified canola oil was first used for cooking.
  17. FrankG
    @Per I loved this LCHF video from your site...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zT_1dCbbR4I

    It's quirky... I love the computer voices (translated from Swedish?) and minimal action, but salient points are made, many common questions are answered, and just about every one of the usual objections is countered -- all in a nice neat package :-)

  18. MaryB
    If they have no butter, do they have cream? I guess I sound like Marie Antoinette... "If they have no bread, can they not eat cake?" But if there is a shortage of butter and not a shortage of cream it should be easy to make your own butter. I have made butter many times from full fat whipping cream.

    If they also have a cream shortage, that is more serious to me than a butter shortage. I can always use a different fat, such as coconut oil, but to be without cream is truly a hardship.

  19. Zepp
    I do think its a manufacturing problem, they aint prepared to that high demand and its take som time to change the produktion.

    It was not so long ago that we had a buttermountin, but now adays when peopel knows that butter isnt a posion, but have some doubts about margarine, they have changed there minds.

up

Leave a Reply

Reply to comment #0 by

Pictures of participants through Gravatar