“Tons of sugar and limited nutrients” – why juice is not healthy

08carroll-jumbo

More and more health organizations have realized that sugar and soda are major culprits in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. But for some reason fruit juice has escaped blame, in spite of its great sugar content and lack of nutrients.

It’s time to stop viewing fruit juice as healthy. As the author of this NYT article writes: “We doubt you’d take a multivitamin if it contained 10 teaspoons of sugar.”

The New York Times: Seriously, juice is not healthy

Sugar

Earlier

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One Comment

  1. Diane Welland
    As a registered dietitian working with the Juice Products Association, I would like to correct some misinformation. In the New York Times op-ed, Drs. Cheng, Fiechtner and Carroll ignore the majority of nutrition science supporting 100% juice in a healthy diet. One hundred percent fruit juice is classified within the fruit group by the USDA because it is nutritionally similar to whole fruit, containing the same essential vitamins and minerals such as vitamin C, magnesium and potassium, and no added sugars. A systematic review published in the March 2018 issue of Advances in Nutrition reaffirms that there is no conclusive evidence linking 100% fruit juice to adverse health conditions, including obesity. In fact, research shows that people who drink 100% juice have higher intakes of whole fruit and a better overall diet quality compared with non-drinkers. With more than 75 percent of Americans not eating the recommended amounts of fruit, it is important to encourage Americans to consume more fruits in all forms – juice included.

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