Dietitian: Low Carb Could Be the Best Diet

Today's Dietitian

Check out this very low-carb positive article in a magazine for dietitians:

Today’s Dietitian: Low-Carb Diets — Research Shows They May Be More Beneficial Than Other Dietary Patterns

There are some smart dietitians out there! Quite a few have realized that low-carb often is the way to go for their patients. And a few are starting to tell others.

You can read the entire magazine online. But watch out for the fraudulent Dreamfields’ Pasta ad on page 7. Someone should sue these guys before they end up killing (more?) people with their fake low-carb pasta. Nasty stuff.

40 comments

Top comments

  1. Zepp
    A small step for a dietican.. a giant leep for mankind!

    Its strange that we can put a man on the moon.. but we cant figure out whats best for a diabetic too eat??

    Read more →
  2. murray
    Martin, none of the LCHF people I know have noticed dry eyes. I have been LCHF about five years without any dry eye or digestive problem. I recall Stephen Phinney saying he has been ketogenic for some 20 years. Perhaps it would be more accurate to say some people are prone to dry eyes or other mucin deficiencies. I notice these types of over-cautionary statements here and there. Dave Asprey (aka Bulletproof Executive) is hypersensitive to mycotoxins, histamines and dairy and puts otherwise beneficial foods, such as garlic, for example, on his "red" list. I don't doubt for a second his reports of measured reaction, in him, however, even he acknowledges that he is hypersensitive to these things. In another context, he suggests eating tomatoes if you are not sensitive to nightshades. Well, I am a bit sensitive to nightshades, but I have no discernible sensitivity to minute levels of mycotoxins, to histamines or to dairy. Elaine Cantin counsels avoidance of dairy, as she measured blood sugar and insulin responses in herself and her son to butter and found that avoiding it improved her efforts to reduce blood sugar and enhance ketosis. I measured my response and was unaffected.

    So I read with scepticism claims such as "you will be mucin deficient" if you stay in ketosis. Rather, one might say, if you experience mucin deficiency in ketosis, you should eat a higher load of carbs once in a while. Dry eyes are easy to detect. It is not as though it is a deficiency that builds undetected for years and only gets noticed after it passes a catastrophic point of no return.

    Read more →

All comments

  1. FrankG
    A positive step :-)
  2. Zepp
    A small step for a dietican.. a giant leep for mankind!

    Its strange that we can put a man on the moon.. but we cant figure out whats best for a diabetic too eat??

  3. AnnU
    It fails to mention whether low carb is healthy for normal healthy people. Is low carb beneficial for a person without diabetes or weight concerns?
    Replies: #4, #5
  4. Zepp
    It dosnt matter that much.. let them take one step at the time!

    If dieticans could accept low carb for diabetics.. its like a dambursting flood thats sweep over mankind!

    And next step is.. if you dont like to be a diabetic.. eat like a diabetic!

    Reply: #6
  5. robert
    How can 'only eating real food' not be beneficial?

    Look at it like this: some industrial material that is sold as "food" doesn't even rot. It's processed foods such as sugar, twinkies, some breads, cereals etc.

    Your typical microorganisms (fungi & bacteria) usually will quickly eat any real food that is left outside the fridge. And even inside the fridge they will sooner or later get to it. These things are tough survivors, and it should give us food for thought why they simply don't touch this stuff.

    I may be oversimplifying things a bit, but it is at least worth a thought.

  6. robert
    That reminds me of a talk by Sally Fallon (Weston A. Price Foundation).

    One slide had a cartoon on it.

    "Eat like a pyramid, look like a pyramid."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2iDUFQsHHE&feature=youtu.be...

  7. Martin
    "The ADA approves the use of a low-carbohydrate diet in individuals with type 2 diabetes who are overweight or obese as a way to promote weight loss, although it cautions that this approach should be limited to one year, probably because of the sparse number of studies supporting the long-term safety when its nutritional recommendations were published in 2008."

    What's the Doc's opinion on why they limit it to 1 year only rather than a permanent lifestyle? At least they recognise the weight loss potential of LCHF.

    The only nutritional deficiency I can think of are mucin deficiencies (i.e. dry eyes, digestive problems). Easily dealt with through weekly high-carb refeed meals (e.g. rice, tubers).

  8. Nan
    I've been following this low carb dietician for a year or more: http://www.lowcarbdietitian.com/

    http://www.sugaraholics.com

  9. MargaretRC
    @Martin, what leads you to say LCHF results in mucin deficiencies? That isn't mentioned an any of many studies I've read re low carb and I think you are mistaken that that would be a problem. And weekly high carb refeed meals are problematic, particularly for diabetics, who should never eat high carb and generate BG spikes.
    As to why the ADA advises to limit low carb to one year, who knows? Stupidity? Diabetes isn't curable. You can only relieve the symptoms. If, after a year, one goes back to eating higher carb, problems with blood sugar will again arise. It's just plain nonsense based on conventional dogma that one shouldn't follow low carb for more than a year. If I were diabetic, I'd be in it for life. In fact I'm not diabetic, but I'm still in it for life. @AnnU, there is no reason a low carb diet based on real food should be harmful for anyone, diabetic or not, with weight concerns or not. I have neither, but have been low carb for over 2 years.
  10. Richard Mjödstånka
    Margareth,

    diabetes is curable with really high carb feeding, whole-food starch-based diet. See star-mcdougaller page for more info, a great loci of inspiring stories.
    http://www.drmcdougall.com/stars/index.html

    Low-Fat, High-Carb Diets Reverse Insulin Resistance
    http://www.medpagetoday.com/Columns/At-Large/31400

    Reply: #25
  11. Paul
    To cure diabetes with high carb feeding (starch=glucose) or/and to reverse insulin resistance is the same like put down fire with gasoline (ok it is a trashy comparison, but it suits the proposed trashy notion). Richard you proposition does not make sense biochemically one iota. One iota. You might as well make suggestion that we start to make cars with square wheels.
    Reply: #12
  12. FrankG
    Actually putting out a fire with gasoline was exactly the analogy which came to mind for me also Paul :-)

    I think this presentation by the Mythbusters team demonstrates quite ably why I think starch (coffee creamer in this case) when mixed with oxygen is inflammatory...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRw4ZRqmxOc

    Dentists have been telling us for decades that sugar left in your mouth causes inflammation... why would anyone assume it behaves any differently inside the blood vessels?

    Another car-based analogy which works for me, is the idea that running your body predominantly on glucose (starch) is like running your family car on rocket-fuel... sure it might go great.. for a while... until the engine explodes!

    Reply: #13
  13. Paul
    "Dementia risk tied to blood sugar level, even with no diabetes." August 7th, 2013. http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-dementia-tied-blood-sugar-diabe...

    I am still waiting for the constructive/critique comments from our starch eating denizens on the above post by Murray.

    As number of us indicated on the pages of this blog (FrankG including) that your starch-pushing attitude may result in a dire state of health for some people.

    Reply: #14
  14. FrankG
    I think you link is broken Paul but I found this...

    http://psychcentral.com/news/2013/08/10/dementia-risk-tied-to-higher-...

    “The most interesting finding was that every incrementally higher glucose level was associated with a higher risk of dementia in people who did not have diabetes,” said first author Paul K. Crane, MD, MPH, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine, adjunct associate professor at the UW School of Public Health, and an affiliate investigator at Group Health Research Institute. “There was no threshold value for lower glucose values where risk leveled off.”

    The really hypocritical thing is that long-term complications of high Blood Glucose (BG) -- including blindness, kidney failure, amputations -- are already recognised, well established and not at all controversial. Meantime the best that can be offered as to why we should avoid dietary fat, is sketchy at best and far from incontrovertible. Double-standards abound I guess when views are driven by a vegan agenda.

    Reply: #15
  15. Paul
    "...driven by a vegan agenda." - with heavy financial support by pharmaceutical diabetes/cholesterol/blood pressure (just to name tip of the iceberg) industry.
  16. robert
    Does curing a patient from an illness require him or her to still be alive?

    If not... then this high-carb feeding scheme by Dr. McD seems like a good way to "cure" a lot of people.

    Marc Sisson wrote a piece on his blog some time ago, aptly named "My Escape from Vegan Island". It portrays his experience on a "Mc Dougal" seminar / holiday. I agree with him on the point that something isn't quite right there.

    Hint: sweetened beverages...

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/vegan-island/

  17. Richard Mjödstånka
    But, but...

    Sisson promotes "therapeutic" doses of testosterone, sells protein powders & puts out an immense cascade of pseudoscientific nonsense.

    Replies: #18, #19, #21
  18. FrankG
    Is that your pathetic attempt to discredit anyone who puts out "an immense cascade of pseudoscientific nonsense"? LOL

    How many hours of drivel did you put out on YouTube Pee Pee???

    In that case I think it is clear that even by your own "standards" you are NOT worth listening to.

    Of course I'd go much further and reiterate that your advice is harming people. Time for you to slink back under your stone.

  19. Paul
    I am waiting for your analysis Richard of the following:
    (is this pseudoscience as well?)

    http://psychcentral.com/news/2013/08/10/dementia-risk-tied-to-higher-...

    “The most interesting finding was that every incrementally higher glucose level was associated with a higher risk of dementia in people who did not have diabetes,” said first author Paul K. Crane, MD, MPH, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine, adjunct associate professor at the UW School of Public Health, and an affiliate investigator at Group Health Research Institute. “There was no threshold value for lower glucose values where risk leveled off.”

    Reply: #20
  20. Paul
    You know what will happen if you won't - your Big Farma bosses will cut your pay. C'mon Richard show us some brain power !!
  21. robert
    Mr. Sisson may not be without flaws. I can't say much about that. I don't know anything about the supplements he sells, as I haven't looked into that. I prefer real food, and it seems to me he does too.

    Proposing to "cure" T2 diabetes with high dosages of carbohydrates seems equally wrong as trying to cure alcoholic liver damage with high dosages of alcohol (nobody would even think about that). Unless of course the word "cure" now includes premature death. Granted, being dead does remove all ailments, but... your dead.

  22. Martin
    @MargaretRC

    Paul Jaminet raises it in this article: http://perfecthealthdiet.com/category/diets/optimal-diet/

    Reply: #23
  23. murray
    Martin, none of the LCHF people I know have noticed dry eyes. I have been LCHF about five years without any dry eye or digestive problem. I recall Stephen Phinney saying he has been ketogenic for some 20 years. Perhaps it would be more accurate to say some people are prone to dry eyes or other mucin deficiencies. I notice these types of over-cautionary statements here and there. Dave Asprey (aka Bulletproof Executive) is hypersensitive to mycotoxins, histamines and dairy and puts otherwise beneficial foods, such as garlic, for example, on his "red" list. I don't doubt for a second his reports of measured reaction, in him, however, even he acknowledges that he is hypersensitive to these things. In another context, he suggests eating tomatoes if you are not sensitive to nightshades. Well, I am a bit sensitive to nightshades, but I have no discernible sensitivity to minute levels of mycotoxins, to histamines or to dairy. Elaine Cantin counsels avoidance of dairy, as she measured blood sugar and insulin responses in herself and her son to butter and found that avoiding it improved her efforts to reduce blood sugar and enhance ketosis. I measured my response and was unaffected.

    So I read with scepticism claims such as "you will be mucin deficient" if you stay in ketosis. Rather, one might say, if you experience mucin deficiency in ketosis, you should eat a higher load of carbs once in a while. Dry eyes are easy to detect. It is not as though it is a deficiency that builds undetected for years and only gets noticed after it passes a catastrophic point of no return.

  24. Zepp
    Now.. in English!

    Low-carb living for families

    by Monique Le Roux Forslund

    http://www.lifezone.se/eng/

    http://www.amazon.com/Low-carb-living-families-Monique-Forslund/dp/14...

  25. Over 60
    @Richard, BS.
  26. Wade Henderson
    Too funny, the entire article in the magazine was written by the following person who is described elsewhere in the following way...

    "Paleo Dietitian. and author of the soon-to-be-released book Digestive Health with REAL Food, Aglaée Jacob, stops by the show to discuss how to address common digestive ailments through diet."

    Yes, I'm sure Agaee Jacob gave a good account of all the science and didn't slant the article in one direction.

    Why is it that whether you read low carb sites or low fat sites, they refuse to read anything but fully biased articles?

    Replies: #27, #28
  27. FrankG
    Perhaps you could suggest an fully unbiased source for us to read Wade?

    Speaking personally (assuming "persons" are entitled to an opinion?), as a Type 2 Diabetic I don't find the current dietary recommendations "too funny". So I welcome a professional who is willing to question them and offer an alternate viewpoint.

  28. Zepp
    She seems to be a Canadian registred dietitian and got a master deegre in Nutrition!

    http://www.eat-real-food-paleodietitian.com/paleo-dietitian-about.html

    Of course its the same biased studys she links too.. thats nothing strange.. the intresting thing is that the articel is publiced in a dietitian magazine!!

    And the really strange thing is that the magazine did accept it!

    Or mayby not.. things are developing.. even the science about diabetes.. and about nutrition!

  29. FrankG
    I find it strange that during all these decades where low fat (high carb) has been (and still is being) promoted, I have no recollection of an outcry of "oh this is all so one-sided and biased!" or "how crazy is it to avoid an entire food group!" or even "well we don't really know the long term safety of this diet"...

    But now as LCHF starts to make inroads into the mainstream... :-P

    ---

    Also to point out that neither Dr Andreas' title (Low Carb Could Be the Best Diet) nor the one used in the magazine article, tout this diet as the one and only, the be all and end all, or some kind of panacea... it is offered as a POSSIBLE option. I just wish it had even been discussed with me in those terms when I was first diagnosed with Metabolic Syndrome.

  30. Sophie
    Just as a side note: what I find interesting is that the magazine indicates that cooking at home i.e. not eating anything prepared in a factory and sticking to real food, is best.

    For some people, just cooking at home, even high carb, could be a giant step for their health.

    Reply: #31
  31. Paul
    But for me carbs no matter how complex or natural = glucose = not all that good food. I avoid carbs like a plague and it serves me beautifully. Here is another example out of many:

    Nat Commun. 2013 Aug 14;4:2245. doi: 10.1038/ncomms3245.

    Human-relevant levels of added sugar consumption increase female mortality and lower male fitness in mice.

    Ruff JS, Suchy AK, Hugentobler SA, Sosa MM, Schwartz BL, Morrison LC, Gieng SH, Shigenaga MK, Potts WK.
    Source
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA.

    Abstract
    Consumption of added sugar has increased over recent decades and is correlated with numerous diseases. Rodent models have elucidated mechanisms of toxicity, but only at concentrations beyond typical human exposure. Here we show that comparatively low levels of added sugar consumption have substantial negative effects on mouse survival, competitive ability, and reproduction. Using Organismal Performance Assays-in which mice fed human-relevant concentrations of added sugar (25% kcal from a mixture of fructose and glucose, modeling high fructose corn syrup) and control mice compete in seminatural enclosures for territories, resources and mates-we demonstrate that fructose/glucose-fed females experience a twofold increase in mortality while fructose/glucose-fed males control 26% fewer territories and produce 25% less offspring. These findings represent the lowest level of sugar consumption shown to adversely affect mammalian health. Clinical defects of fructose/glucose-fed mice were decreased glucose clearance and increased fasting cholesterol. Our data highlight that physiological adversity can exist when clinical disruptions are minor, and suggest that Organismal Performance Assays represent a promising technique for unmasking negative effects of toxicants.

  32. Wade Henderson
    Sophie, "For some people, just cooking at home, even high carb, could be a giant step for their health."

    Agree, if you just took a group of regular people and a control group. Then have the intervention group do nothing more than cook all their food at home with relatively unprocessed ingredients.
    Foods that grandma might have been able to purchase 100 to 125 years ago.

    That intervention group over 5 years would end up much more healthy regardless of their inclusion or exclusion of carbs.

    90% of the products on today's supermarket shelves weren't available 125 years ago.

  33. grinch
    If carbohydrates per se were forcing us to over-consume calories due to their metabolic effect, then why do baked potatoes and regular soda (not a fan) not cause me to become ravenously hungry? It seems I am only prone to overeating foods that I really like, which tend to be high in carbs but also fat. When you exclude most of the hyper-palatable, empty calorie food sources, its simply harder to overeat. The foods you have at your disposal aren't appealing enough. Let's face it, as a former low carb practitioner, the foods I looked forward to eating the most were almost always high protein - eggs, meat, etc. or fiber. While I like these foods, that protein and fiber have a satiating affect that makes them self-limiting.

    Heck I love these dry-roasted, salted almonds that I often buy. Sometimes I can go overboard with them. One time I bought raw unsalted almonds and I could barely eat any because they were so bland. Macros the same, yet I overeat one and barely touch the other.

    Its hard to believe that carbohydrates play such an important role in weight and health with the billions of people doing just fine with them.

    Reply: #34
  34. Zepp
    Its not carbs per se thats bad.. its hyperinsulinemia thats bad per se!!

    And there are several ways to get this condition.. but only few ways to reverse it!

  35. grinch
    But there is a lack of evidence that carbs per se cause hypersinulinemia. The insulin spike from carb intake is not the same as hyperinsulinemia which is chronically high levels of insulin. Hyperinsulinemia is reduced just by simply being in a caloric deficit, regardless of whether carbohydrate intake is high or low. It seems the only advantage of a low carb diet is that it eliminates a lot of problematic foods, with no evidence that its the carb content and insulin response that drives this.
    Reply: #36
  36. Zepp
    I do know the differens betwen normal insulin secretion and hyperinsulinemia.. without a normal insulin secretion you got Diabetes type1 or worse!

    Well, Im not that convinced that a calorie deficit on high carbs reduce hyperinsulinemia if you dont reduce the carbs within this calorie deficit!

    But calorie reduction almoste reduce all macronutrients.. altso the carbs!!

    I think that it is the Paleo part that reduce bad food!

    How could you know that.. if one goes frome regular 50% carbs to 5E%?

    But as you saying.. it force you to cook your food at home.. becuse you cant bye that food at Wall Mart!

    Well there are a lot of evidence that Hyperinsulinemia is a normal state to coop with chronic high levels of blood sugar!

    But there other ways to get this condition too.. like insulinom, hypercortisol, and other medical conditions such as medecin side effects!

  37. ElleLondon
    Of course it is good for non diabetic people. How can it not be? Eating real food is good for everyone.
  38. Dood
    This is my first time to try such a diet . I will follow all the rules but am soooooo frightened I might gain not loose. Especially I will be adding mayo to most if my meals .
    Reply: #39
  39. Zepp
    Way that.. ad mayo if its normal to that dish!

    Take full fat food instead.. use normal amounts of butter for coocking, ad full fat cream for sauces and sprinkel some olive oil on your veggies!

  40. robert
    I hope you make your own mayo with a good oil. You can buy mayo with only little or no sugar added, but as far as the oil is concerned... often they only declare it as 'vegetable oil', which is likely the cheapest omega-6-rich oil, not so good.

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