28 comments

  1. The kids at the end rock. I hope my children are as level-headed, well-spoken and generous with their loved ones as those two are despite being under pressure. AND they know that candy will give them a bellyache!
  2. SharonV
    The kids at the end were adorable! I found it sad, though, that there were so many very pudgy kids, and there were so many tantrums.Not just crying, but fall-to the floor anguish.
  3. Kim
    Shared on FB!
  4. Katy
    And this is why our kids DON'T go trick-or-treating- they aren't little either (ages 12, 10 and 8) and we still easily avoid a nasty 'tradition'.
  5. Chris H
    How can parents be so mean to their kids? What a shame, all for 30 seconds of fame...
  6. DoragonMama
    It seems to me that this is more an issue of trust, those kids went to bed thinking that their possessions were safe in their house but woke up to be told that their parents had stolen from them.

    When you cannot be safe in your own house or trust your own parents it really rocks your world.

    This is a shameful trick to play on young children.

  7. But the point of the post was to show the overreaction of those kids when they thought they were going to miss out on their anticipated sugar addiction high.
    I regularly see such tantrums when shopping in the local supermarket when kids try to blackmail parents into buying candy before leaving the shop.
    I suspect these kids would display the same overreaction if the story had been the dog had eaten the candy.
    Intense Sweetness Surpasses Cocaine Reward
  8. I've just had a look on YOU TUBE at the originals there are some less extreme responses.
    These little girls are sweet
  9. Jay Wortman MD
    Halloween is of course a night of horrors for our household. We have learned to cope, though, with an approach that allows the kids to have fun and also not damage their health with all the sugar. They go out and collect as much candy as they can. We then weigh it and buy it from them by the kilo. They get cash and we do the world a favour by tossing the candy in the trash where it belongs. No tantrums, either.
  10. I don't "get" Halloween since I didn't grow up with it. The kids at the end were too cute for words. Haha.
  11. SL
    Hmm...

    Kids addicted to sugar: not good

    Parents lying to their kids: not good

  12. @ SL .
    But how can else you discover what the reaction of your kid would be to the prospect of sugar deprivation without setting up a scenario where the loss of candy supply was a considered genuine by the child.?
    I agree this is not a laughing matter.
    I would have been ashamed if any of my children had over-reacted to the "The Sweets have gone crisis" and would not have posted the video to You Tube.
    However these videos are important if we are going to understand how in 10~20 years time when these kids become teenagers or young adults, they may react to low glucose and poor glucose metabolism situations with aggression and violence.
    The indications are there in some of these examples. We have to try to understand what we as a society are doing with the constant promotion of sugared cereals for kids
  13. It's sad that these are the kids' reactions (part from the last "sneaky mom" maybe), i.e. not that they've been "betrayed" by the parent but that the candy is gone ...
  14. Diane
    From earliest times you are taught that if you behave and work hard you will be rewarded. These kids had to behave all through one of the most exciting kid-centered festivals of the year. They were probably told a million times not to run, to wait for your little sister, to just take one, to say thank you. They walked miles and worked hard for their reward. And then it was taken away. They won't get another chance for a whole year. It's not unlike how you would feel if your boss told you sorry, I spent your paycheck. Better luck next month. Heck, it's a lot like how I feel when I see my retirment funds disappear whenever the stock market crashes. The reaction isn't about the sugar.
  15. Tom
    Agreed...they're upset because their mommy stole from them. They're responding to betrayal and untrustworthiness in the adult who had been their biggest protector...one who thinks it's funny enough to videotape their humiliation.

    That would suck!

  16. DoragonMama
    There was no reason that the parent had to tell them that THEY STOLE FROM THEM, they could have just said it was missing, or stolen or that the parent found it tampered with or poisoned etc. There were many alternatives to betraying their children.

    If you wanted to see how kids react to their missing candy then tell them it's missing, but all you got from this experiment was kids being betrayed and robbed by their parents and there is no child who wouldn't react badly to that.

  17. Wolfstriked
    Maybe a simple exchange with kids of one small delicious desert but you eat the rest of the food on your plate beforehand instead of trying to cut a kid of sweets completely?Worked for many generations with a stern hand......
  18. Katy
    I agree that these responses have nothing whatsoever to do with missing out on their sugar addiction. My grandhildren's father thinks it's cute to sneak bites of their food while they're not looking and it elicits protests. If they are asked for a bite, they are more than generous. How is this different than parents telling their children that if they eat their supper, they can have dessert, and then informing them when their plates are clean that there isn't any dessert? It's lying, cheating, stealing. Betrayal. If the parents didn't want their children to have the candy in the first place, then they shouldn't have gone begging, or they should have set the ground rules first.
  19. Lawrence Louis
    Dr. Eenfeldt,

    Thank you for posting this clip. It was not only quite humorous, but also underscores a very depressing fact. The fact that the children were so distressed due to the prospect that their parents ate their candy, illustrates how much our children's palates are addicted to sweet substances. I have seen children cry less when a close relative has died. I personally experienced, just recently, the hold that candy has on a child's mind. At a birthday party for my 5 year old nephew, they had a Pinata there, which is basically a box, shaped like an animal, that children swing a stick at, in order to break open and inside candy falls out. The children swing at the Pinata while blind folded. It is basically a game played commonly in the United States and Mexico during birthdays. What I found interesting and disturbing is that while the blind folded child would swing at the Pinata, in order to break it open, as pieces of candy fell out, the rest of the children would rush towards the Pinata to pick up the candy, while the blind folded child was still swinging. In other words, these children demonstrated such a fixation with sugary candy, that they would risk a head injury to compete with for more of these "

  20. Lawrence Louis
    Dr. Eenfeldt,

    Thank you for posting this clip. It was not only quite humorous, but also underscores a very depressing fact. The fact that the children were so distressed due to the prospect that their parents ate their candy, illustrates how much our children's palates are addicted to sweet substances. I have seen children cry less when a close relative has died. Their volatile reaction is what you would expect to see from a long time drug addict, who just found out that his supply of heroin or cocaine was stolen from him.

    I personally experienced, just recently, the hold that candy has on a child's mind. At a birthday party for my 5 year old nephew, they had a Pinata there, which is basically a box, shaped like an animal, that children swing a stick at in order to break it open so that the candy that is inside the Pinata falls out. The children swing at the Pinata while blind folded. It is basically a game played commonly in the United States and Mexico during birthdays. What I found interesting and disturbing is that while the blind folded child would swing at the Pinata and pieces of candy fell out, the rest of the children would rush towards the Pinata to pick up the candy, while the blind folded child was still swinging. In other words, these children demonstrated such a fixation with sugary candy, that they would risk a head injury to compete with for more of these "treats". How sad is that?

    When I watched this video, and I saw two obviously obese children cry about not having their candy, I thought to myself about how sad it is that their parents where so irresponsible as to let children, especially in their unhealthy condition, have candy in the first place. I know that sounds kind of harsh, but when children are this heavy at this stage in their life, when they should be at their leanest, they are being setup for a whole host of future bad habits and associated health complications. If I were a parent, I wouldn't allow my kids to participate in the accumulation of candy, even if it is a Halloween tradition. One can enjoy a holiday, without the deleterious dietary habits that go along with it. I would rather my kids face being outcasts for a short period of time, than inculcate them with bad dietary practices which can lead to greater problems down the road.

  21. Katy
    Talk about jumping to conclusions! The children rushing for candy from the cracked-open pinata would have done the same thing if it had been stuffed with toys, swinging stick notwithstanding. They're CHILDREN. They don't necessarily see the consequences of their actions. Ever seen children walk in front of swing set while other children are on the swings? Children also spontaneously run into the street to fetch balls out-of-play. They walk behind cars pulling out of driveways. On the other hand, betrayal by those whom you previously trusted is one of the most painful of experiences.
  22. Milton
    @Katy "On the other hand, betrayal by those whom you previously trusted is one of the most painful of experiences."

    And it often has very long-lasting consequences. I understand what the video was trying to prove, but didn't any of these parents consider the ramifications of how this act will affect their relationship with their children for the rest of their lives? I hope they had long and thoughtful discussions with their children afterwards, not about the dangers of sugar-addiction, but about trust and betrayal. And it should include a heartfelt apology.

    Here's a better way to teach your children to moderate their sugar intake and eat healthy: by setting an example in their diets and your own. I think that children are far more strongly influenced by what they see their parents DO than by what they hear their parents SAY. The best way to teach them good eating habits is to eat right. The best way to teach them to be trustworthy and dependable is to NOT do what they did in that video.

  23. gallier2
    Emm, people, the parents probably then explained that it was a prank, and the children will have laughed at it. Constructing life long psychological consequences from a little prank is unlikely. They are children, much tougher than overprotecting parents think they are. It bothers me a lot when people think children are retarded, porcelaine puppets.
  24. DoragonMama
    There is no evidence that these parent had any talk or even any thought about what they did to their children, these are after all parent who pranked their own children to get on TV, hardly the thoughtful and considerate types.

    All we know is that they betrayed their children's trust and violated their sense of security. Any imagined conversation afterwards is just that, imagined.

    This is their childhood and it's the only one they get, parents should be keeping that sacred and sacrosanct, not exploiting their trust for a good laugh on youtube.

    It breaks my heart to see how little children mean to people.

  25. gallier2
    @DoragonMama

    This is an excerpt of an entertainment show, it's obvious that the show is cut for the most dramatic effect, it's not a documentary. It's clear that even if the parents have taped their post-prank resolution of the situation, it would have been cut for the show. So your "there's no evidence yada yada" shows only that you have a problem with assessing reality. Maybe, you should have needed these kind of pranks as a child, may be you would have grown some sense of humour.
    And don't get me started on your "It breaks my heart to see how little children mean to people.", overprotecting children is imo a worse form of abuse. Children do need to be confronted to the harsh reality of the world, progressively and competently. Letting them in a la-la-land cocoon until they are grown-up, is the breeding ground for egotistical psychos as too many are already.

  26. Katy
    "Children do need to be confronted to the harsh reality of the world, progressively and competently."

    Right. Parents, steal from, lie to, and betray your children's trust before the rest of the nasty world does!! It'll be so much better coming from you.

    "It bothers me a lot when people think children are retarded, porcelaine puppets."

    It bothers me when people think it's ok to behave any way they like towards children, because, after all, they're not fragile or worse, "just kids. They'll get over it." No, kids are certainly not fragile; childred endure far more pranks and humiliation (and pain) because "it's all in good fun" or "you're too thin-skinned" or __________. And I never said they were "retarded" (not nice, btw). Far from it. If they were, they wouldn't have cared so much that those closest to them betrayed their trust.

    Do you also believe it's ok for parents to tease children about their weight, or not-so-perfect noses, or big feet, or whatever else people find funny? After all, that's the world we live in. Let's teach them to expect it, right? It's one thing to get this junk from outside the home. It's an entirely different ballgame when it's done by you family members.

  27. DoragonMama
    I used to wonder how little kids turned into such terrible bullies, I see now that some parents raise them bullied and they just mimic the only behavior they know.

    Tragic.

  28. M
    I will never understand why people watch videos and get angry at the kids when they (justifiably) get upset when they were told "I took your personal property away from you. I knew it belonged to you, but it's mine now"

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