15 Comments

  1. JAO
    That is very interesting.
  2. Meatsallad
  3. Bernardo
    I don't like where he's going. What if the government decides that you need legal age to eat meat as he suggests should be done with sugar? It's kinda scary!
  4. Meatsallad,
    I actually posted that too a couple of months ago: ;)
    http://www.dietdoctor.com/diabetes-support-fail
  5. Margaretrc
    No. Soda and diabetes together is clearly not a coincidence. However, like Bernardo, I am not sure I like where Dr. Lustig is going with this. It's a really slippery slope he's standing on. I'd like to find a better way, if there is one.
  6. Don't worry, any public health battle against sugar would take a long, long time to get anywhere if it were modeled, say, after the battle against tobacco. Sugar is used more widely in our culture than tobacco ever was, and sugar still has a benign image in the minds of most people. The fact is, you can probably use a little sugar your entire life and not be hurt by it. You can also use it without affecting people around you -- no "second-hand sugar." So while I think some fight should be made, it is a question of what kind of fight. I prefer education to bans, but expect push-back from the industry even on educational efforts. Reuters has a story along that line:
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/07/20/us-obesity-lobbying-idUSTRE...
  7. Tim Heineman
    Questions Raised by Wikipedia’s ‘Diabetes Mellitus Type 2’ Article

    I believe you may disagree with statement 1 in regard to saturated and unsaturated fats. A reference is given in support of the statement. Could you explain why the reference is incorrect?

    1. Under Lifestyle: “decreasing consumption of saturated fats and trans fatty acids while replacing them with unsaturated fats may decrease the risk.[6]”

    Reference 6: “^ a b Risérus U, Willett WC, Hu FB (January 2009). "Dietary fats and prevention of type 2 diabetes".Progress in Lipid Research 48 (1): 44–51. doi:10.1016/j.plipres.2008.10.002. PMC 2654180.PMID 19032965.”

    In statement 2 you may disagree with the inclusion of the words ‘high-fat diets’. A reference is given in support of the statement. Could you explain why the reference is incorrect?

    2. Under Medical Conditions: “Additional factors found to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes include aging,[13] high-fat diets[14] and a less active lifestyle.[15]”

    Reference 14: “^ Lovejoy JC (October 2002). "The influence of dietary fat on insulin resistance". Curr. Diab. Rep. 2 (5): 435–40. doi:10.1007/s11892-002-0098-y. PMID 12643169.”

    In statement 3 you may disagree with the inclusion the word ‘fat’. The reference given in support of the statement is an article referring to specific research. Could you explain why the research does not support the conclusion?

    3. Under Genetics: “Gene expression promoted by a diet of fat and glucose, as well as high levels of inflammation related cytokines found in the obese, results in cells that "produce fewer and smaller mitochondria than is normal," and are thus prone to insulin resistance.[33]

    Reference 33: “^ "The origin of diabetes Don't blame your genes They may simply be getting bad instructions—from you". Economist. 3 September 2009.”

    In statement 4 I’m not sure if you disagree with the inclusion of ‘high cholesterol’ (what is ‘high’?) as a risk factor for T2D. If you do, could you explain why the reference is incorrect?

    4. Under Management: “Managing other cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, high cholesterol, and microalbuminuria improves a person's life expectancy.[7]

    Reference 7: “^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Ripsin CM, Kang H, Urban RJ (January 2009). "Management of blood glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus". Am Fam Physician 79 (1): 29–36. PMID 19145963.”

    Dim Tim

  8. Hi Time,
    I'll take a look at those references although a quick comment to begin with:
    When using the phrase "may decrease the risk" [my italics] it's usually an unproven theory we are discussing.

    And as no intervention trial has ever shown a low-fat diet to be better for diabetics than even a liberal low carb diet (using advice of, say, a maximum of 35% carbs) it's basically an unproven theory we are discussing here. A theory that makes no sense.

  9. AnneDK
    My brother and I are the only ones in my family to have diabetes 2 - we are also the only ones who have worked shifts.
    My job was sedentary, but my brother was a mechanic and biked to work.
    We are both somewhat overweight, but not morbidly.
    Neither of us ate a lot of candy or drank a lot of soda, so the only common denominator is the shift work.

    Are there any statistics that show whether shift workers have a higher percentage of diabetes?

    Also, my blood sugar explodes when I have an inflamed shoulder, so I'm thinking another cause of diabetes 2 could be long time inflammation, caused by stressing the body with shift work.

  10. Funderaren
    Anne, people who work shift usually has bad eating habits. Even if their food isnt that bad, they do tend to eat at times when they shouldnt.
  11. FrankG
    @Anne: Dr Briffa has a piece here about disrupted sleep having negative health effects... http://www.drbriffa.com/2012/02/10/can-lack-of-sleep-contribute-to-ob...

    For myself I never found I adjusted well to shift-work and poor sleep has been associated with high-blood pressure, obesity, lack of energy (no surprise), diabetes etc...

  12. AnneDK
    That's true - I definitely has a meal on night shifts around 4:30.
    That meant I didn't eat any breakfast before going to bed and usually had brunch around 15:30.

    So I guess irregular eating promotes diabetes 2 ...

  13. Zepp
    Diabetes May Start in the Intestines, Research Suggests

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120215123352.htm

  14. Zepp-interesting research!

    Annedk- do a google seach on issues with shift work/night work. I know I've read a number of articles about the disruptions to several body functions when people don't get "normal" night time sleep.

  15. Inez Aultman
    I am NOT a fan of soda consumption. I AM a fan of clean statistics-- and gleaning from these two maps that soda consumption equates to diabetes is a stretch.

    It would be more beneficial to have these maps in different hues and textures and to be able to overlay them to see the actual coincidence of these two factors.

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