Placing a Cap on Americans’ Consumption of Added Sugar

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The Food and Drug Administration has finally decided to put a cap on daily sugar intake for Americans. The recommendation will be for a maximum of 10 percent of calories, meaning no more than 12.5 teaspoons of sugar per day.

NYT: Placing a Cap on Americans’ Consumption of Added Sugar

Some people worry about the consequences of recommending less sugar:

But even enthusiastic supporters of the new rules worry that a cap on sugar could boomerang. Sugar is often used to make reduced-fat dairy and high-fiber grains more palatable, so what would happen if people eliminated sugar from their diet?

Personally I can’t quite see the problem.

Earlier

WHO Recommends Cutting Sugar Intake in Half!

The Sugar Ghost: An Ingredient That Haunts Our Food and Threatens Our Children

How Much Sugar are You Feeding your Family Without Even Knowing It?

Another Article of Hidden Sugars in Everyday Foods

12 comments

  1. Pierre
    12.5 teaspoons of sugar per day. = 50 gr/day = 18.25 kg /year or ~40 pounds of added sugar per year

    I propose 5 gr/day

    http://www.sugar-and-sweetener-guide.com/consumption-of-sugar.html

  2. palo
    The cap, although too high (should be 15 grams per day) is meaningless because it is unenforceable. What prevents individuals from consuming 1,000 grams a day?

    The solution is rationing sugar to 15 grams a day per person and business.

    Rationing worked perfectly during WW2 and nobody died because of it.

    Reply: #4
  3. Stipetic
    Some movement, but it's still 12.5 teaspoons short of the mark. :-)
  4. Tor H
    This is added sugar, not the natural sugars found in fruit, milk etc.
    Eat only natural non-processed foods and you'll hit well below the 10 percent mark, easy :)
    Reply: #5
  5. Pierre

    This is added sugar, not the natural sugars found in fruit, milk etc.
    Eat only natural non-processed foods and you'll hit well below the 10 percent mark, easy

    This is true if you don't eat fruit.

    A medium banana (7" to 7-7/8" long) (= 118 g) has 27 gr of Carbohydrate and 3 gr of fiber.

  6. Tor H
    Nope, still true as there's no added sugar in fruit.
    Natural sugars doesn't count as added sugars.
    Replies: #7, #9
  7. Peter Biörck Team Diet Doctor
    True, but this is obviously a problem with the term "added". For instance if you use dates to make a pie taste sweet, is that added sugar? Nevertheless, I think it's a good idea to talk about "added sugar" in the food, the perfect definition doesn't exist.

    Nope, still true as there's no added sugar in fruit.
    Natural sugars doesn't count as added sugars.

  8. Tor H
    Good point, but WHO adresses that in their report if I remember correctly.
  9. Pierre

    Nope, still true as there's no added sugar in fruit.
    Natural sugars doesn't count as added sugars.

    Steve Job used to think the same.
    Do an experience for a week by eating 3 bananas a day.
    You will tell us how much weight you put on.

  10. Tor H
    Bananas contain zero added sugar.
    The fact that one gains weight from all the sugars in bananas is not the point, ofc one gains weight from all that sugar, but none of it is added, it's all natural sugars.
  11. Pierre
    The point is sugary fruits do not belong in a LCHF diet neither candies.

    Only once in a while.

  12. Tor H
    I totally agree, but that is a completely different discussion.
    This one is about added sugars.

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