20 comments

  1. Adrian
    I choose the sausages, cherry tomatoes and the don't-know-what-it-is-made-from sauce

    Also the cheese (in case that is cheese, because I don't like roquefort/blue cheese)

  2. FrankG
    Are those Babybel cheeses in red at the top right? Great choices and eating on the floor, with your family, is a bonus :-)
  3. Andrew
    What kind of sausage?
    Reply: #7
  4. Anita
    All of the above would be very tasty, together with some mascarpone and chorizo!
  5. Jan
    Looks good to me.

    A low carb picnic whether indoors or out ....now that's style.

    All the best Jan

  6. Álvaro
    Andreas, can you tell us what the sauce and the red things are? Thanks!
  7. Zepp
    I dont know.. but it seems to be "fredagsmys"!

    I.e, friday cosy!

    At friday evening family gathers to eat togheter.. and the children often have a lot to say about what to eat!

    And its probably some youghurt dipp.. full fat youghurt and spices/herbs for dipping.

    If its old fashion swedish style its based on sourcream instead.

    But its more comon whit TexMex.. yes you read it right.. its the new fredagsmys i sweden, and its a big export sucess to!

    http://www.oldelpaso.se/

    Those red things looks like baby bel cheese in ther wrapings.!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babybel

  8. Fernán González
    Poor carpet, lol.
  9. Mitch
    I could eat that, looks good!

    Though are the carbs enough for a child ? - just a thought....

  10. Megan
    Funnily enough - this picnic looks very similar to what my children would have chosen when they were small too. But I was not low carb then. They are now teenagers but still love guacamole with carrots and peppers. But they will also ask for tortilla wraps....

    Children naturally gravitate to this kind of food - things they can dip, colourful foods, different textures.

    it makes such a change from the usual bland white sandwiches and brown deep fried foods we usually see at parties etc.

  11. oliviascotland
    This is very similar to my children's favourite meals when they were little, and which they nick-named "picky bitty". If I did put anything like bread on the plate, it was usually left, so I stopped bothering with the carb aspect unless it was asked for. And we weren't low carb then.
  12. JMQ
    I'll choose just the carbs - toms, carrots, peppers, and cucumber - or would that make me fat?
    Reply: #14
  13. Andrew
    The sausage just needs some sauerkraut a big pretzel and beer to wash it down with and it would look just like alot of the meals I ate in Munich, Germany :) Most people would say all the cured meat and refined carbs are bad and while I did see some obesity there they still look fitter than in America.
  14. Lori Miller
    No, just hungry.
  15. Eric Anderson
    Also high fay diet seems good for the brain

    High-fat diet postpones brain aging in mice
    Date:November 5, 2014
    Source:University of Copenhagen – The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    Summary:New research suggests that signs of brain aging can be postponed in mice if placed on a high-fat diet. In the long term, this opens the possibility of treatment of children suffering from premature aging and patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

    New Danish-led research suggests that signs of brain aging can be postponed in mice if placed on a high-fat diet. In the long term, this opens the possibility of treatment of children suffering from premature aging and patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The research project is headed by the Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen and the National Institute of Health.

    When we get older, defects begin to develop in our nervous system, our brain loses some of its intellectual capacity, and the risk of developing diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's increases. Alzheimer's disease is currently the fastest-growing age-related disease.

    Throughout our lives, it is important that our cells -- to the extent possible -- keep our DNA undamaged, and, therefore, the cells have a system that repairs the damage that occurs all the time. Humans age when the repair system ceases to function. In diseases such as Alzheimer's, the researchers also see damage to the DNA

    A new research project headed by the Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen and the National Institute of Health has studied mice having a defect in their DNA repair system. In humans, this defect causes the disorder Cockayne syndrome, where patients prematurely age as children and die at an age of 10-12 years. The study shows that placing a mouse model of Cockayne syndrome on a high-fat diet will postpone aging processes such as impaired hearing and weight loss.

    Fat putting a stop to premature aging

    "The study is good news for children with Cockayne syndrome, because we do not currently have an effective treatment. Our study suggests that a high-fat diet can postpone aging processes. A diet high in fat also seems to postpone the aging of the brain. The findings therefore potentially imply that patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease in the long term may benefit from the new knowledge," says Professor Vilhelm Bohr from the Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen and the National Institute of Health, who has headed the study.

    Our brain has a constant need for fuel in the form of either sugar or so-called ketones. Ketones are the brain's fuel reserve, and, in particular, play an important role in periods of low blood sugar levels, e.g. if you are fasting. This is because the body breaks down fat if it needs sugar, and during this process it produces ketones. The researchers see a particular positive effect when the mice are given the so-called medium chain fatty acids -- e.g. from coconut oil.

    Brain cells need extra fuel

    "In cells from children with Cockayne syndrome, we have previously demonstrated that aging is a result of the cell repair mechanism being constantly active. It eats into the resources and causes the cell to age very quickly. We therefore hope that a diet with a high content of coconut oil or similar fats will have a beneficial effect, because the brain cells are given extra fuel and thus the strength to repair the damage," says postdoc Morten Scheibye-Knudsen from the National Institute of Health.

    The study has just been published in the scientific journal Cell Metabolism.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Story Source:

    The above story is based on materials provided by University of Copenhagen – The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Journal Reference:

    Morten Scheibye-Knudsen, Sarah J. Mitchell, Evandro F. Fang, Teruaki Iyama, Theresa Ward, James Wang, Christopher A. Dunn, Nagendra Singh, Sebastian Veith, Md Mahdi Hasan-Olive, Aswin Mangerich, Mark A. Wilson, Mark P. Mattson, Linda H. Bergersen, Victoria C. Cogger, Alessandra Warren, David G. Le Couteur, Ruin Moaddel, David M. Wilson, Deborah L. Croteau, Rafael de Cabo, Vilhelm A. Bohr. A High-Fat Diet and NAD Activate Sirt1 to Rescue Premature Aging in Cockayne Syndrome. Cell Metabolism, 2014; 20 (5): 840 DOI: 10.1016/j.cmet.2014.10.005

  16. MargaretRC
    Love picnics on the floor--at least I did as a child. I think my old bones would be less tolerant of that now, but I have some wonderful memories of picnics on the floor that we had when I was growing up. Only the food then was less healthy! That's a wonderful spread there!
  17. Sarah
    I'll take it all ... I mean, I'll taste a little bit of everything on the photo
  18. Ben M
    Is the baby eating low carb?

    Low carb diets are good for loosing weight only, not long term way of living / eating. They worked for me and helped in my weight loss. I eat low carb when i need to loose weight only.

    But its not a way to live a life! Its not sustainable for the majority of the world populations, meat ,butter, cheese costs way more than carb food sources. Grains & carbs are not bad as they are made to look by low carb enthusiasts.

    In my part of the world Nairobi, Kenya i come from the region with many world class runners, their diets are high carbs from a very young age. Staple foods is 'githeri' mixture of maize & beans boiled and fried in onions, 'Uji' porridge made from corn floor. Sour milk (fermented milk) called 'Mursik' Most of these runners are lean and strong endurance athletes.

    Not only the Athelets also the villages they come from, its Kenya's bread basket / main agricultural area. Diets are high carbs as they come & people are lean. It all boils down to genetics, calories & level of physical activity. No one single marco nutrient is to blame, that's my opinion.

    Reply: #19
  19. Zepp
    Sweden is one of the most rich countrys in the world.. Dr Eenfeldt is a doctor.. i.e. he is a high income taker even in rich Sweden!

    In Sweden women/wifes altso work and have an income even if they have children!

    I think that they have afford to eat what they like.. or even buy the healtyest food for them self and there children!

    Im an ordanary worker.. have an ordanary salary.. in rich sweden.. I altso have aford to eat what I like!

    I even need to own a car.. how is very expensive in Sweden to drive to special places for buying grassfeed meat!

    And I do understand that real food is expensive in poor countrys, for poor people!

    And its an issuie even even in rich Sweden.. those whit lowest income/social statuse eat the worst food and fetch the moste illness!

    Heres an interesting tread from India.. how not is the richest country in the world!

    http://www.dietdoctor.com/lchf-success-greetings-india

  20. fartymarty
    well i woundnt eat the carrots as that has starch in it,

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