2. What to eat on a keto diet

Here are typical foods to enjoy on a ketogenic diet. The numbers are net carbs per 100 grams.1 To remain in ketosis, lower is generally better:

Keto diet foods: Natural fats (butter, olive oil); Meat; Fish and seafood; Eggs; Cheese; Vegetables that grow above ground
 

The most important thing for reaching ketosis is to avoid eating too many carbohydrates. You’ll probably need to keep carb intake under 50 grams per day of net carbs, ideally below 20 grams. The fewer carbs, the more effective.

Counting carbs can be helpful at first, but if you follow our guides and recipes you can stay keto even without counting.

Detailed list of what to eat on keto

 

2. What to eat on a keto diet

Here are typical foods to enjoy on a ketogenic diet. The numbers are net carbs per 100 grams.2 To remain in ketosis, lower is generally better:

keto-guide-new-mobile

The most important thing for reaching ketosis is to avoid eating too many carbohydrates. You’ll probably need to keep carb intake under 50 grams per day of net carbs, ideally below 20 grams. The fewer carbs, the more effective.

Counting carbs can be helpful at first, but if you follow our guides and recipes you can stay keto even without counting.

Detailed list of what to eat on keto

 

2. What to eat on a keto diet

Here are typical foods to enjoy on a ketogenic diet. The numbers are net carbs per 100 grams.3 To remain in ketosis, lower is generally better:

keto-guide-new-mobile

The most important thing for reaching ketosis is to avoid eating too many carbohydrates. You’ll probably need to keep carb intake under 50 grams per day of net carbs, ideally below 20 grams. The fewer carbs, the more effective.

Counting carbs can be helpful at first, but if you follow our guides and recipes you can stay keto even without counting.

Detailed list of what to eat on keto

 

2. What to eat on a keto diet

Here are typical foods to enjoy on a ketogenic diet. The numbers are net carbs per 100 grams.4 To remain in ketosis, lower is generally better:

keto-guide-new-mobile
 

The most important thing for reaching ketosis is to avoid eating too many carbohydrates. You’ll probably need to keep carb intake under 50 grams per day of net carbs, ideally below 20 grams. The fewer carbs, the more effective.

Counting carbs can be helpful at first, but if you follow our guides and recipes you can stay keto even without counting.

Detailed list of what to eat on keto

 

2. What to eat on a keto diet

Here are typical foods to enjoy on a ketogenic diet. The numbers are net carbs per 100 grams.5 To remain in ketosis, lower is generally better:

keto-guide-new-mobile
 

The most important thing for reaching ketosis is to avoid eating too many carbohydrates. You’ll probably need to keep carb intake under 50 grams per day of net carbs, ideally below 20 grams. The fewer carbs, the more effective.

Counting carbs can be helpful at first, but if you follow our guides and recipes you can stay keto even without counting.

Detailed list of what to eat on keto

 

2. What to eat on a keto diet

Here are typical foods to enjoy on a ketogenic diet. The numbers are net carbs per 100 grams.6 To remain in ketosis, lower is generally better:

keto-guide-new-mobile
 

The most important thing for reaching ketosis is to avoid eating too many carbohydrates. You’ll probably need to keep carb intake under 50 grams per day of net carbs, ideally below 20 grams. The fewer carbs, the more effective.

Counting carbs can be helpful at first, but if you follow our guides and recipes you can stay keto even without counting.

Detailed list of what to eat on keto

 

2. What to eat on a keto diet

Here are typical foods to enjoy on a ketogenic diet. The numbers are net carbs per 100 grams.7 To remain in ketosis, lower is generally better:

keto-guide-new-mobile
 

The most important thing for reaching ketosis is to avoid eating too many carbohydrates. You’ll probably need to keep carb intake under 50 grams per day of net carbs, ideally below 20 grams. The fewer carbs, the more effective.

Counting carbs can be helpful at first, but if you follow our guides and recipes you can stay keto even without counting.

Detailed list of what to eat on keto

 

2. What to eat on a keto diet

Here are typical foods to enjoy on a ketogenic diet. The numbers are net carbs per 100 grams.8 To remain in ketosis, lower is generally better:

keto-guide-new-mobile
 

The most important thing for reaching ketosis is to avoid eating too many carbohydrates. You’ll probably need to keep carb intake under 50 grams per day of net carbs, ideally below 20 grams. The fewer carbs, the more effective.

Counting carbs can be helpful at first, but if you follow our guides and recipes you can stay keto even without counting.

Detailed list of what to eat on keto

 

Try to avoid

Here’s what you should not eat on a keto diet – foods full of sugar and starch, including starchy foods like bread, pasta, rice and potatoes. As you can see, these foods are much higher in carbs.

Foods to avoid on low carb: bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, fruit, beer, soda, juice, candy

 
The numbers are grams of net carbs per 100 grams, unless otherwise noted.9

This means that on keto you’ll need to completely avoid sweet sugary foods, plus starchy foods like bread, pasta, rice and potatoes. Just follow our keto diet advice, and remember that the food should be high in fat, not high in protein.

A rough guideline is below 10% energy from carbohydrates (the fewer carbs, the more effective), 15-25% from protein (the lower end is more effective), and 70% or more from fat.

More specific advice on what to eat – and what not to eat
 
 

What to drink

Low-carb drinks

So what do you drink on a keto diet? Water is perfect, and so are coffee or tea. Ideally, use no sweeteners. A modest amount of milk or cream is OK (but beware of caffe latte!). The occasional glass of wine is fine too.

Check out our full guides to keto drinks and keto alcohol.

 

2. What to eat on a keto diet

Here are typical foods to enjoy on a ketogenic diet. The numbers are net carbs per 100 grams.10 To remain in ketosis, lower is generally better:

Keto diet foods: Natural fats (butter, olive oil); Meat; Fish and seafood; Eggs; Cheese; Vegetables that grow above ground
 

The most important thing for reaching ketosis is to avoid eating too many carbohydrates. You’ll probably need to keep carb intake under 50 grams per day of net carbs, ideally below 20 grams. The fewer carbs, the more effective.

Counting carbs can be helpful at first, but if you follow our guides and recipes you can stay keto even without counting.

Detailed list of what to eat on keto

 

Try to avoid

Here’s what you should not eat on a keto diet – foods full of sugar and starch, including starchy foods like bread, pasta, rice and potatoes. As you can see, these foods are much higher in carbs.

Foods to avoid on low carb: bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, fruit, beer, soda, juice, candy

 
The numbers are grams of net carbs per 100 grams, unless otherwise noted.11

This means that on keto you’ll need to completely avoid sweet sugary foods, plus starchy foods like bread, pasta, rice and potatoes. Just follow our keto diet advice, and remember that the food should be high in fat, not high in protein.

A rough guideline is below 10% energy from carbohydrates (the fewer carbs, the more effective), 15-25% from protein (the lower end is more effective), and 70% or more from fat.

More specific advice on what to eat – and what not to eat
 
 

What to drink

Low-carb drinks

So what do you drink on a keto diet? Water is perfect, and so are coffee or tea. Ideally, use no sweeteners. A modest amount of milk or cream is OK (but beware of caffe latte!). The occasional glass of wine is fine too.

Check out our full guides to keto drinks and keto alcohol.

 

  1. Net carbs per 100 grams, i.e. what percentage of that food that is made up of digestible carbs.

    100 grams = 3.5 ounces.

    Net carbs (or “digestible carbs”) are total carbs minus fiber. Fiber is OK to eat since it doesn’t affect blood sugar levels.

  2. Net carbs per 100 grams, i.e. what percentage of that food that is made up of digestible carbs.

    100 grams = 3.5 ounces.

    Net carbs (or “digestible carbs”) are total carbs minus fiber. Fiber is OK to eat since it doesn’t affect blood sugar levels.

  3. Net carbs per 100 grams, i.e. what percentage of that food that is made up of digestible carbs.

    100 grams = 3.5 ounces.

    Net carbs (or “digestible carbs”) are total carbs minus fiber. Fiber is OK to eat since it doesn’t affect blood sugar levels.

  4. Net carbs per 100 grams, i.e. what percentage of that food that is made up of digestible carbs.

    100 grams = 3.5 ounces.

    Net carbs (or “digestible carbs”) are total carbs minus fiber. Fiber is OK to eat since it doesn’t affect blood sugar levels.

  5. Net carbs per 100 grams, i.e. what percentage of that food that is made up of digestible carbs.

    100 grams = 3.5 ounces.

    Net carbs (or “digestible carbs”) are total carbs minus fiber. Fiber is OK to eat since it doesn’t affect blood sugar levels.

  6. Net carbs per 100 grams, i.e. what percentage of that food that is made up of digestible carbs.

    100 grams = 3.5 ounces.

    Net carbs (or “digestible carbs”) are total carbs minus fiber. Fiber is OK to eat since it doesn’t affect blood sugar levels.

  7. Net carbs per 100 grams, i.e. what percentage of that food that is made up of digestible carbs.

    100 grams = 3.5 ounces.

    Net carbs (or “digestible carbs”) are total carbs minus fiber. Fiber is OK to eat since it doesn’t affect blood sugar levels.

  8. Net carbs per 100 grams, i.e. what percentage of that food that is made up of digestible carbs.

    100 grams = 3.5 ounces.

    Net carbs (or “digestible carbs”) are total carbs minus fiber. Fiber is OK to eat since it doesn’t affect blood sugar levels.

  9. Net carbs per 100 grams, i.e. what percentage of that food that is made up of digestible carbs.

    100 grams = 3.5 ounces.

    Net carbs (or “digestible carbs”) are total carbs minus fiber. Fiber is OK to eat since it doesn’t affect blood sugar levels.

  10. Net carbs per 100 grams, i.e. what percentage of that food that is made up of digestible carbs.

    100 grams = 3.5 ounces.

    Net carbs (or “digestible carbs”) are total carbs minus fiber. Fiber is OK to eat since it doesn’t affect blood sugar levels.

  11. Net carbs per 100 grams, i.e. what percentage of that food that is made up of digestible carbs.

    100 grams = 3.5 ounces.

    Net carbs (or “digestible carbs”) are total carbs minus fiber. Fiber is OK to eat since it doesn’t affect blood sugar levels.