Coca-Cola Admits Its Big Fat Problem

bloomberg-coke

Here’s an interesting article about how Coca Cola now admits its and the soda industry’s big problem. More and more people now realize that you get fat from drinking soda – and fewer people drink it.

Businessweek: Coke Confronts Its Big Fat Problem

This despite the fact that Coca Cola recently spent billions on trying to deceive and confuse their customers:

Previously

Coca Cola Blames Chairs, Assumes You are Stupid

Is Your Dietitian Educated by The Coca Cola Company?

Drink Coca Cola Like Grandpa

Good News: Coca Cola is Going Down

25 comments

Top comments

  1. FrankG
    "why are we giving a pass to thousands of other sodas"

    Are we? I didn't think so.

    This article happens to be about Coca Cola; which is one of the biggest players in this market.

    Read more →
  2. Tyrannocaster
    Holy sh*t, did anybody else read this part of the article:

    "Next year the company [Coca Cola] hopes for a national rollout of Fairlife, milk in which the molecules have been disassembled and then reformed to create different variations (high-protein, lactose-free milk) that taste like the regular thing."

    I don't know about you, but I really want to start my day with some disassembled molecules!

    I think the leadoff image they have of Santa Claus is devastating to Coca Cola - it's PR at its most effective, and I would LOVE for it to replace Coke's image in the public mind. That could easily happen if it were more widely disseminated. So spread it around.

    Replies: #15, #17, #20, #22
    Read more →

All comments

  1. tony
    it's appropriate to criticize coke. But why are we giving a pass to thousands of other sodas (i.e. pepsi, rcc, canada dry) which are as lethal as coke?
    Replies: #2, #11
  2. FrankG
    "why are we giving a pass to thousands of other sodas"

    Are we? I didn't think so.

    This article happens to be about Coca Cola; which is one of the biggest players in this market.

  3. Vicente
    After reading the article I think the problem they admit is they are selling less cans than a few years ago and coke is now seen as an unhealthy drink. They are not concerned about health.

    Just read the last lines of the article: “Interestingly enough on the Web,” says Douglas, “mentions about obesity got almost quiet for a month.” Is it a good sign for him that people stops being concerned about obesity?

  4. tony
    Frank, my point is that the other sodas are never shown by name and I'm afraid some may believe they are ok.
  5. Welldun
    The article lost me at "documentary Super Size Me was nominated for an Oscar." I like my documentaries to be based on fact.
  6. Zepp
    Well, im not that concerned.. the thing is that Coca cola company stands for all sugary fizzy drinks!

    Manly becuse there image is linked thru there advartatise to that sugary fizzy drinks are related to relaxation and fiesta!

    And if anyone thinks that Pepsi is better.. they are out of reach anyhow!

  7. Boundless
    from the frist para of the article:
    "... he [pres. of CC NA] doesn’t allow himself a second. “I will probably have a Coke Zero in the afternoon at some point,” he concedes ..."

    Also conceding that he knows nothing about health (and his salary depends on that ignorance).

    The fattest people I know always have a DIET soda in tow. Does this mean that artificial sweeteners are also an obesity problem? No. It means that people who drink diet pop have serious problems elsewhere in their diet and have no idea what to do about it. Many of them think a diet pop cancels out a Krispy Kreme donut.

    And yes, some artificial sweeteners are indeed a health problem (probably including the pandemic aspartame usually in diet pop), and some even an obesity problem (probably including Splenda in most other diet pops), because they aren't as low GI as they pretend.

    Reply: #8
  8. Zepp
    But.. but.. if they are as low as they say.. then one can drink more of them.. or?
  9. Eddie Mitchell
    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" Upton Sinclair
  10. Brenda
    Ok....anyone with comon sense knows that this just does not pertain to the company Coca Cola, as we all know that All sodas contain some form of sugar, whether it is natural or man made sweetners. Perhaps people are in denial if they think differently. Too much consumption of sweetner, even if it is natural/organic sugar is not heathly.

    I use to drink Diet cola's such as Pepsi or Dr. Pepper, it was all about the taste as regular colas taste too sweet for my taste then diets sodas, except the lemon limes like Sprite/7up; NOT all obese people drink diets sodas because we think its better for us. Got to choose your words carefully or open mouth, insert foot.

    Give me a big fat glass of unsweetened Iced Tea any day..........yum.

  11. Andrew
    Not to mention processed fruit juices and chocolate milk still get a free pass in public schools! No soda but chocolate milk and fruit punch is ok!!?? Hypocrisy for sure! :(
    Replies: #12, #23
  12. FrankG
    Where do you see hypocrisy? And what the heck do you mean by a "free pass"?

    Are you really suggesting that: until EVERY single possible sweet drink is targeted, we should leave poor victimised Coca Cola alone?

    How about baby steps?

    Start with soda... and sure, why not target the big compainies first -- they are the ones with the big marketing budgets after all. They are the ones sponsoring sporting events and writing the curriculum for dietitians!

    Fruit juice and chocloate milk are going to be an harder sell, to convince people that they are not such a great choice but hey if the kids are no longer drinking gallons of soda, then just maybe some chocolate milk isn't gonna kill them! Sugar is not bad per se.. it's the total dialy dose that has become the issue.

  13. Eddie Mitchell
    Take on the big guys, change them and the rest will have to follow. Unilever, Kellogg, Coca Cola they all know the writing is on the wall. The momentum is building by the day. As the Who said years ago "We won't get fooled again" It is up to us to keep spreading the word to everyone we know. High starch/sugar food is the new tobacco.

    Kind regards Eddie

  14. Tyrannocaster
    Holy sh*t, did anybody else read this part of the article:

    "Next year the company [Coca Cola] hopes for a national rollout of Fairlife, milk in which the molecules have been disassembled and then reformed to create different variations (high-protein, lactose-free milk) that taste like the regular thing."

    I don't know about you, but I really want to start my day with some disassembled molecules!

    I think the leadoff image they have of Santa Claus is devastating to Coca Cola - it's PR at its most effective, and I would LOVE for it to replace Coke's image in the public mind. That could easily happen if it were more widely disseminated. So spread it around.

    Replies: #15, #17, #20, #22
  15. FrankG
    I had read that and yes it is genuinely scary...

    I'm not sure how many realise that this is how they "make" 1%, 2% etc.. milk already

    When I was a boy (50 years ago) and "milk" was just milk, you could buy skimmed milk but that just meant they had mechanically skimmed the cream off top.

    So I assumed that 1% was manufactured by removing the fat down to that level.. not so! They break the whole milk, down into its constituent parts and then put the bits back together to make the 1%, 2% or whatever... kinda like "whole grain bread" which is really refined flour with some stuff added back in to meet the minimum requirements.

    ---

    As for the popular image of Santa, did you know that was also a Coca Cola advertising coup? Victorian pictures often had him dressed in green or other earth colours... is it any accident that the colours we now associate with Christmas, are the exact same corporate colours as everyone's favourite soda?

    Read all about it, proudly posted on their own web site! http://www.coca-colacompany.com/holidays/the-true-history-of-the-mode...

    ...at the same time they also claim to have not advertised directly to children under 12 age over the past 50 years! :-P

    Reply: #18
  16. Tyrannocaster
    That's exactly why this picture is so bad for Coke; it's using Coke's own image against it, which is the best possible thing to do. Turn its own marketing against the company and you are acting just like the faulty autoimmune response the body comes up with to sugar, leading to diabetes eventually. Only you're doing it to the company that is pushing the sugar. It's wonderful and I'm going to use it as the basis for my own blog post tomorrow. Thanks for the link, Andreas.
  17. Nate
    Tyrannocaster, Now I don't normally like to use four letter words in blogs, but your choice of words as a response to that paragraph are totally appropriate. Disassembled milk molecules? Who are they kidding? We are going way off the reservation with a goal like that for our "food" providers.
  18. Nate
    Frank G, Well, I thought disassembling milk molecules was their goal. I had no idea it was a fait accompli. there is so much to know about this world of processed food, which I don't really want to know. Unfortunately one of the strengths of the big food corporations is that they are very quiet about what they do. I don't remember the details but the number and size of the monopolies in the food industry is worse than it was during Sinclair's time. They keep a very low profile and keep their lobbyist well connected.
  19. Eddie Mitchell
    "They keep a very low profile and keep their lobbyist well connected"

    Some Black Ops outfits in the UK and Europe and their pay masters.

    DUK The diabetes charity.

    Abbott Bayer Boehringer Ingelheim Bristol Myers Squibb Bupa Bunzl Everyclick First Capital Connect Flora pro.activ Kodak Lilly Lloyds Pharmacy Menarini Merck Serono Morphy Richards Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited Novartis Novo Nordisk Nursing Times PAL Technologies Ltd Pfizer Rowlands Pharmacies Sanofi-aventis SplendaTakeda Tesco Diets

    HEART UK -The Nation’s Cholesterol Charity

    Abbott Healthcare Alpro UK AstraZeneca BHR Pharma Cambridge Weight Plan Cereal Partners UK (Sh Wheat) Food & Drink Federation Fresenius Medical Care (UK) Limited Genzyme Therapeutics Hovis Kellogg’s (Optivita) Kowa Pharmaceutical Europe Co Limited L.IN.C Medical Systems Limited Merck Sharpe & Dhome PlanMyFood Pfizer Premier Foods Progenika Biopharma s.a. Roche Products Limited Unilever (Flora) Welch’s (Purple Grape Juice)

    The British Nutrition Foundation

    However, the organisation's 39 members, which contribute to its funding, include – beside the Government, the EU – Cadbury, Kellogg's, Northern Foods, McDonald's, PizzaExpress, the main supermarket chains except Tesco, and producer bodies such as the Potato Council. The chairman of its board of trustees, Paul Hebblethwaite, is also chairman of the Biscuit, Cake, Chocolate and Confectionery Trade Association.

    The European Food Information Council

    Current EUFIC members are: AB Sugar, Ajinomoto Sweeteners Europe, Bunge, Cargill, Cereal Partners, Coca-Cola, Danone, DSM Nutritional Products Europe Ltd., Ferrero, Kraft Foods, Mars, McDonald's, Nestlé, PepsiCo, Pfizer Animal Health, Südzucker, and Unilever.

    The British Heart Foundation

    Unilever Flora margarine.

    Kind regards Eddie

  20. Kim S.
    They are already selling Fairlife at some of the grocery stores in my area. Last week I received an email from one of my local grocery stores offering me a $1 off coupon on the milk. Just for ha-has I checked it out the last time I was shopping. It comes in 2%, skim and chocolate (hmmm. no whole milk). The 2% has half the number of carbs as the whole, organic milk that I buy and quite a bit more protein. But it just seems to "unnatural" a process to reel me in.

    Now that I know that it's owned by Coca-Cola, I'm even less likely to try it. When you go to the product's website, it makes it seem like a group of dairy farms that have formed some sort of co-op to provide a healthy product. Not the end product of some giant conglomerate.

    http://fairlife.com/who-we-are/

  21. demesio
    All major food corporations headquarters should relocate to Palestine so the jews can do some good for humanity
  22. Mark
    Note that "lactose free" milk is typically made by adding lactase. Which as a side effect will raise the GI. Since sugar disolves in water skimmed milk contains much more than "whole milk".
    Also the resultant glucose/galactose mix does not occur naturally. Contrast this with the big fuss about the likes of HFCS which has a sugar content not unlike honey.
  23. Rita
    Your right about the fruit juice. I've read people talking about it, but no one comments about chocolate milk, as far as I've seen. If the milk and chocolate in chocolate milk, was organic plus the sugar pure, then it would be Healthy for children everywhere: especially at school. Especially where they have to have good nutrition, to get good grades.
    I'm Replying to Andrew - #12
  24. Rita
    I wouldn't put it past them to give donations to research firms that try to cure diabetes. I don't remember but its something I think a Poster already said. When they themselves are creating it; with other commercial drink and food companies.
  25. Rita
    Yes I felt that was the way it was too. When they started advertising it was from farms, I wasn't fooled by that.

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