Chief Physician: Forget About the MyPlate Guidelines

Makethisyourplate

A growing number of health care professionals recognize that the old advice on a low-fat, high-carb diet has been an embarrassing mistake. Here’s another one, chief physician Ulf Rosenqvist, Medical Specialist Clinic, Motala, Sweden. Here’s a quote:

It’s confusing when suddenly the truth no longer holds. It’s been taken as dogmatic faith that one should eat according to the MyPlate Guidelines. All health care professionals have been indoctrinated in this…

Now it’s time for forget the Swedish version of the MyPlate guidelines (very similar to the current US version) and aim for richer foods again, he says.

The Food Revolution is on a roll! Here’s the full article translated into English:

Chief Physician: Forget About the MyPlate Guidelines

It’s confusing when suddenly the truth no longer holds. It’s been taken as dogmatic faith that one should eat according to the plate model. All health care professionals have been indoctrinated in this, says Ulf Rosenqvist, chief physician at the Medical Specialist Clinic, Motala, Sweden.

His view is that it became like a holy mantra from various health authorities that it’s healthful to eat carbohydrates, but that fat is unhealthful. New findings put science on its head.

– We have to learn that fat is not the enemy and that we ourselves have to change, says Ulf Rosenqvist.

At the same time he underscores that there are no studies on how saturated fats affect us long term.

– The safest bet so far, is the richer Mediterranean diet with oily fish, nuts and olive oil, where mortality rates are lower than in people who eat a low-fat Mediterranean diet.

He says that the health care system didn’t keep up with educating health care professionals on the subject, and that it becomes confusing when professors appear in media, disagreeing among themselves on what is right or wrong.

– Health care workers don’t know what to believe. The recent SBU (The Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment) report provides a good foundation and our current truth.

Basal Insulin Important

He of course is positive about the fact that there are diabetics who have successfully discontinued taking insulin as a consequence of a diet change. At the same time he makes it clear that this can only happen in patients with diabetes type 2. Those with diabetes type 1 can never completely discontinue taking insulin, as their bodies don’t produce any insulin.

– Then blood sugar levels could soar, and this could be incredibly dangerous. You have to have a basal insulin level, says Ulf Rosenqvist.

What do you think diabetes care will look like in the future?

– We’ll focus on a richer Mediterranean diet – forget about the MyPlate guidelines.

Diet, Exercise and Medication

According to Hannah Helgegren, dietitian and member of the Diabetes Association, a diabetes diagnosis rests on three legs. Diet, exercise and medication. All three pieces are equally important. She knows because she herself has diabetes.

Hanna Helgegren thinks that patients have to take a major responsibility for their own care, but they also have to be offered support from the health care system.

– Living with a chronic disease is a daily challenge. Food is so much more than just blood sugar and weight. Therefore, it’s important that all patients who so wish are given the opportunity to discuss their diet and health with an expert. This is not the case today, and many experience that the health care system gives over-simplified advice, that doesn’t always fit the patient or the patient’s circumstances.

No Sugar

This week the revised Nordic Nutrition Recommendations were released. They advocate more whole grains, fish and vegetables, while sodas, candy and refined wheat flour are discouraged altogether. The recommendations provide the basis for the guidelines from the Swedish National Food Agency (USDA equivalent). They still recommend the plate model (“good proportions of various foods”). Eating twice as much fruit and vegetables, using margarine and vegetable oils are other recommendations mentioned as a way of decreasing the risk of obesity and diabetes. The advice on sugar intake is to cut the consumption of sodas, candy, ice cream, snacks and pastries in half.

Corren: Chief Physician: Forget About the MyPlate Guidelines (Original article in Swedish, by Rita Furbring, Östgöta Correspondenten, Sweden. E-mail: rita.furbring@corren.se)

More

Swedish Expert Committee: A Low-Carb Diet Most Effective for Weight Loss

The Death of the Low-Fat Diet

It Will Get Worse: the New “MyPlate”

Good Night, Low-Fat Diet

Swedes Consuming Low-Fat Dairy Products Gain More Weight!

CBS Sings the Praises of Fat (!)

14 Comments

  1. Zarah McIntosh
    OMG they are still recommending margarine? Are you kidding me?
  2. Gregg Sheehan
    and wholegrains...
  3. Peter Jensen, MD
    Certainly not far enough. Lots of fruit? Not if you're insulin resistant. The only guidelines a government body should officially recommend for all people is to limit sugar and refined carbohydrate. NOT FAT or dairy. An encouraging note this week from US besides Sweden's breakthrough announcement, --this year's official ADA diabetes care dietary guidelines came out this past week. It finally acknowledges that "there is no evidence to support any certain mix of carbohydrates fats and proteins, that it can be individualized. This is finally a break from the old low fat high carb, "heart healthy" recommendations. They also acknowledge some studies showed lipid profile benefits of LCHF diets. See page 7.

    https://mail-attachment.googleusercontent.com/attachment/u/0/?ui=2�...

  4. paulc
    what people think of as a Meditterranean diet is not a proper Meditterranean diet... watch out for all that pasta and gnocchi...
  5. George Henderson
    That would be the traditional Mediterranean diet of the Scandinavian peoples then. The one all Scandinavians ate before the diabetes/obesity/metabolic-train-wreck epidemic. Ok then.
  6. Jo tB
    The following really hit home with me:

    Living with a chronic disease is a daily challenge. Food is so much more than just blood sugar and weight. Therefore, it’s important that all patients who so wish are given the opportunity to discuss their diet and health with an expert. This is not the case today, and many experience that the health care system gives over-simplified advice, that doesn’t always fit the patient or the patient’s circumstances.

    So true, so true.

    I would love to discuss my diabetes T2 and food with an expert, instead of having to figure it out for myself. Am I on the right track? Have I overlooked something? How much further tweaking does it need? Things I cannot discuss with a traditional dietician, who will only advise me to eat more bread.

  7. Daci
    They advocate more whole grains

    More!? They already getting too much of this crap. I don't get why they keep pushing whole grains like they are a good thing. They are definitely a bad thing.

    Reply: #10
  8. Phocion Timon
    The best way to determine the integrity of the "My Plate" theory is examination of the origin. What good can possibly come from a set of guidelines created by a bunch of self-serving bureaucrats and politicians? My operating rule is the government is always guilty of misconduct, even purposeful malfeasance, unless incontrovertibly proven otherwise.
  9. FrankG

    ... I don't get why they keep pushing whole grains like they are a good thing ...

    Good for business and the political funds (with the promise of well-paid jobs) that benefit the policy-makers, courtesy of grateful big business... plus it helps to keep the populace weak and docile.

  10. Marcy
    Of course they push grains, I believe the pharmaceutical companies want us all to be sick so we have to rely on their drugs. Everything boils down to money.
  11. Dave the Low Carb Hockey Dad
    I'm so excited about Sweden and the SBU study. Now we are beginning to see real movement in the recommendations of a major health authority to its population. Once again, Sweden is "The Little Engine that Could" by carefully going through the data and publishing a comprehensive scientific report along with practical advice. Thank you, Sweden, for showing the world how to elevate above conflict and arguments and use good science to resolve major problems for our health going forward.

    http://thelowcarbhockeydad.blogspot.com/

  12. ret6
    Ectomorph
    Mesomorph
    Endomorph
    Each can metabolize fat differently

    You Sam are an ectomorph You have a high metabolism which doesn't count for us mesomorph and endomorphs
    I want someone thats a mesomorph to try eating that much on a lchf diet and post the results

  13. mezzo
    Contrary to what most people seem to believe a Mediterranean diet is not full of pasta and gnocchi. In Italy Pasta or rice are usually the "secondo piatto", literally translated "second plate" meaning second course. Your starters (primo piatto) are usually veggies marinated in olive oil or a few pieces of salami. The second course is a SMALL helping of risotto or pasta, the third and main course is meat or fish with veggies. There may be a dessert (dolce) and coffee. The portions are small!!! Pasta is not very popular in Spain or France and whole grains have never been popular in the Mediterranean. It's white bread in France, Spain, Italy and Portugal. Large amounts of starchy pasta and pizza are only eaten by those who cannot afford better food.

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