If Certain Foods Make You Sick, Just Take More Medicine

Carb-insulin

Kristine Bell believes that more research is needed before carbohydrate counting can be recommended as a clinical standard in diabetes care. At the same time it would be a challenge to find a control group with which to compare, as the method is so common.

– This is still the best known way to match insulin to meals, she says.

But as doctors we must emphasize that the foundation for the way we eat is still a healthy choice of foods, and that insulin should be matched to foods, rather than excluding carbohydrate-containing foods in order to take less insulin.

The above is from an interview with a researcher and physician in a Swedish Diabetes Magazine. I don’t know if she’s talking about diabetes type 1 only, in which case the above is just stupid. If it’s also about the most common form, type 2, it’s just crazy.

Equally Stupid Advice

Let’s play with the idea that we’re talking about some other disease than diabetes. Then the advice given would be as follows:

  • If you have a peanut allergy, you should continue to eat “healthy” amount of peanuts and take a matching dose of allergy medicine.
  • If you’re lactose intolerant, you shouldn’t avoid milk. Instead, you should take extra lactase tablets with your milk to minimize discomfort.
  • If you suffer from liver failure due to alcohol consumption, you should continue drinking “healthy” amounts of wine. There’s always the option of a liver transplant, should you need one.
  • If you have high blood pressure, you should not eat less sugar, starch or salt. You should eat a “healthy” amount, and take some more blood pressure medication!
  • If you’re gluten intolerant, you should continue to eat “healthy” bread and match this with immunosuppressants.

All these ideas are of course silly nonsense, based on erroneous preconceived notions about what constitutes “healthful” foods.

A Smarter Alternative

Diabetics should think the same way as all others that suffer health problems from certain foods: avoid them.

Anyone who isn’t stuck in old ideas that healthy foods should contain a lot of flour/starch will have a new, revolutionary alternative:

Less blood sugar-raising food makes diabetics require less blood sugar lowering-medication. All diabetics may benefit from this.

More

New Study: More Sugar, More Diabetes

Dr Attia at TEDMED: What if We’re Wrong About Diabetes?

Failed Attempt to Cure Diabetes at Subway

51 comments

Top comments

  1. TJ Huber
    As a physician (retired) and a diabetic (Type II) I do not agree with your labels of "crazy" and "stupid" for this poor woman's misguided advice. I personally consider it malpractice, bordering on criminal.
    The mere idea of adjusting insulin to cover for dietary indiscretions is repugnant to me. Sorry, I'm not trying to be preachy, it's just that these kind of news reinforce my belief in the statistical dictum that 50 % of the population (including a good number of doctors) are below average intelligence.
    Reply: #12
    Read more →
  2. Lisa
    My child has type 1 diabetes. Diabetics are carbohydrate intolerant, therefore they should not eat vast amounts of carbohydrate, as is the usual advice. I can tell you from experience, that the insulin to carb ratio which is used is a rough estimate at best, regarding how much insulin to inject to "cover" the food. There is a much higher risk of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia when eating lots of carbs, because you can never know for sure exactly how much of the insulin will make its way to the blood stream, and you don't know how fast it will get there. You don't know how fast the ingested carbohydrate will be digested. The safest way to maintain good blood glucose levels is to eat a low carb high fat diet, where only small amounts of insulin are required. That way, there is much less chance of error and a lower risk of diabetic complications from high blood sugars.
    Read more →

All comments

  1. Ivor Goodbody
    I fear the main problem may not be with the diabetes doctors, but with their patients. I have two good friends with diabetes, and both have kept virtually all their eating and drinking habits unchanged. They regard their medicines as a quick and easy antidote to helpings of bread-and-butter pudding, and I once watched one of them single-handedly empty almost a whole bread basket at dinner.

    They know their behaviour conflicts with their doctors' advice. But they don't care, even though one they've had some scary complications as a result of their illness.

    Lifelong or multiyear habits are hard to break. I imagine most doctors know this all too well, and some must surely tailor their advice accordingly.

    Wishing you enduring health

    Ivor

    Reply: #3
  2. FrankG
    The bizarre thing is that LCHF approach can still fit within the constraints of a "carbohydrate counting" approach; of matching dietary carbs with insulin -- fewer dietary carbs means less (or no) injected insulin... it just means forgoing the insane advice that we need to eat so many carbs per meal to be "healthy".

    The line that really annoys me is the insistence that somehow those with diabetes (Type 1 or 2) should be allowed to eat "normally". As you point out why do we not insist the same for those with a peanut or seafood allergy, lactose or gluten intolerance? Especially given what I now think about the health costs of a "normal" diet.

    So far as I am concerned I have a carbohydrate intolerance and I expect the same level of consideration at a restaurant etc... as someone who has a peanut or seafood allergy, lactose or gluten intolerance.

  3. FrankG
    I understand what you are saying Ivor but in conversations with newly diagnosed diabetics I all to often hear that the default position from their Doctor is to assume non-compliance with dietary advice instead of giving them a chance and the benefit of the doubt.

    In my experience, people generally live up, or down, to the expectations placed on them. Now sure, we are all responsible adults but when an health care professional talks, most folks still listen -- especially while still reeling from the shock of an scary diagnosis.

    And by the way, I can certainly relate to the almost irresistible biochemical drive to eat an whole basket of bread when the insulin levels are high and BG is fluctuating rapidly. Constant, driving,cellular hunger, is as hard to resist as the need to suck in air if you are forced to hold your breath.

    Reply: #49
  4. TJ Huber
    As a physician (retired) and a diabetic (Type II) I do not agree with your labels of "crazy" and "stupid" for this poor woman's misguided advice. I personally consider it malpractice, bordering on criminal.
    The mere idea of adjusting insulin to cover for dietary indiscretions is repugnant to me. Sorry, I'm not trying to be preachy, it's just that these kind of news reinforce my belief in the statistical dictum that 50 % of the population (including a good number of doctors) are below average intelligence.
    Reply: #12
  5. danny lyons
    The global diabetes therapeutics devices and drugs market is expected to reach USD 72.4 billion by 2018, growing at a CAGR of 10.4% from 2011 to 2018, whereas the global diagnosis and monitoring devices market is expected to reach USD 26.0 billion by 2018, growing at a CAGR of 7.8% for the same period. That’s 98.4 billion reasons why big pharma and the medical establishments that it supports will never allow healthy food choices to have a bearing on diabetics health.
    Reply: #6
  6. Megan
    I completely agree with you Danny. Then consider the profits made by the food industry for selling the carb-laden processed junk, and the fact that media outlets rely on advertising from these companies.... it's a wonder we're even able to have this discussion.

    The way I see this whole debacle is this: 1) necessity is the mother of invention, 2) Western countries have some of the most expensive and sophisticated health care systems in the world. What does that tell you?

    It all comes back to Weston A. Price and changes in food habits since the agricultural and industrial revolutions.

    How is it that we've come to accept all these health problems - cancer, obesity, heart disease, diabetes, etc - as normal? It's terrible.

  7. Sally Asher
    I would much rather eat non-insulin promoting foods than to inject myself with insulin - especially when what you can eat on LCHF is often decadent, luxurious and immensely satisfying.

    If all diabetics got the right dietary advice to help their condition, I'm sure that they would choose to eat LCHF too.

  8. Galina L.
    In US the idea of following a diet is considered to be an equivalent of living one 's life in suffering, and eating the same food as everybody around to be extremely important for a personal happiness. I could never fully understand that, since an early childhood my diet was very restrictive due to a severe eczema. .
  9. Lori Miller
    The naysayers always want more research, don't they. How about more research into the high-starch, low-fat, grainy diet they recommend? Oh wait, America has been trying that for 30 years.
  10. Marg
    Both a brother inlaw and his adult son have been diagnosed with T2 in the last 18 months. They told us they don't need to watch what they eat because they can up their medicine dose. My SIL is a retired nurse. Some people are like Ostriches.
  11. Lisa
    My child has type 1 diabetes. Diabetics are carbohydrate intolerant, therefore they should not eat vast amounts of carbohydrate, as is the usual advice. I can tell you from experience, that the insulin to carb ratio which is used is a rough estimate at best, regarding how much insulin to inject to "cover" the food. There is a much higher risk of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia when eating lots of carbs, because you can never know for sure exactly how much of the insulin will make its way to the blood stream, and you don't know how fast it will get there. You don't know how fast the ingested carbohydrate will be digested. The safest way to maintain good blood glucose levels is to eat a low carb high fat diet, where only small amounts of insulin are required. That way, there is much less chance of error and a lower risk of diabetic complications from high blood sugars.
  12. Murray
    An in-law was diagnosed with type II diabetes and had a quadruple bypass heart operation, but he was not changing his dietary pattern. I asked why not. He said his doctor said it was a normal part of aging and with the medication he could eat anything he wants. Maybe something got mangled in his understanding of what he was told, but he genuinely believed this was his medical advice. It didn't even dawn on him this might be misguided when his older brother (late 60s or early 70s) had a similar normal-part-of-aging trajectory and became depressive, then progressively more into a senior's like dementia and then died. Normal aging and fate, as our in-laws see it.
  13. Jo tB
    Lisa you are practically repeating the 6-12-12 rule by Richard K. Bernstein. He advocates eating 6 grams carbothydrates for breakfast and 12 grams for lunch and dinner. That way you can more accurately calculate your insulin needs He calls it the law of small numbers. Big inputs make big mistakes, small imputs make small mistakes. if you make a mistake in your calculations of how much carbhodrate you are eating it means unnecessary extra insuline and so fluctuating glucose levels.

    FrankG, I agree with you I am carbohydrate intolerant, so why should I stuff my face with them, and combat it by increasing my medication. I prefer to do it the other way, reduce my medication by reducing my carbohydrates to a mimum. If restaurants can take allergies into account, why not with carbohydrate intolerance?

  14. Jo tB
    Murray, I'm an old bird, but I can change my lifestyle. It is NOT part of the aging process to start getting all sorts of maladies (for me diabetes). I know I've got it, but it doesn't rule my life and if I can improve my health by changing my diet I will. I have struggled with my weight since I was 17 years old, and changed what I ate in order to keep the weight off. I stopped putting sugar in my coffee 50 years ago (what I call the front door), but never realised I was getting it through the back door when I started buying my sauces in a jar (covenient), etc. So now I'm back to basics making everything myself from scratch with fresh ingredients.
  15. Anna
    I've had type 2 diabetes for almost 3 years, and during this time I have become aware that thousands of people on the Internet know this simple fact. Yet during this whole time, the medical community is still in huge denial. And people are suffering. How is it possible for such a simple, effective and inexpensive diabetes therapy as LCHF be completely ignored or, in the worst case, dismissed as "impractical" or even "dangerous"?
  16. Paul the rat
    J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013 Nov 5. pii: S2212-2672(13)01408-1. doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2013.08.025. [Epub ahead of print]

    Carbohydrate Intake and Refined-Grain Consumption Are Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in the Korean Adult Population.

    Song S, Lee J, Song WO, Paik HY, Song Y.
    Abstract
    BACKGROUND:
    Metabolic syndrome is prevalent in the Asian population, but little is known about its associations with sources or types of dietary carbohydrates.
    OBJECTIVE:
    We examined relationships between metabolic syndrome prevalence and dietary carbohydrate intake, including total carbohydrate, energy from carbohydrate, dietary glycemic index, dietary glycemic load, total grains, refined grains, and white rice in Korean men and women.
    DESIGN:
    This cross-sectional study was based on data from the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES 2007-2009) and a nationally representative sample.
    PARTICIPANTS/SETTING:
    A total of 6,845 adults (2,631 men, 4,214 women) aged 30 to 65 years with no diagnosed diabetes, hypertension, or dyslipidemia were selected. Dietary intake data were obtained using the 24-hour recall method and all dietary carbohydrate intakes were divided into quintiles by sex.
    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:
    Metabolic syndrome and its components were defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria.
    STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED:
    All statistical analyses accounted for the complex sampling design effect and used appropriate sample weights. Multivariate adjusted logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% CIs for metabolic syndrome across quintiles of dietary carbohydrate intake.
    RESULTS:
    After controlling for potential confounding variables, the determinants of metabolic syndrome were the percentage of energy from carbohydrates in men and intakes of refined grains, including white rice, in women. Triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose levels were associated with the percentage of energy from carbohydrates in men and white rice intake in women.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Our findings suggest that the sources and types of carbohydrates were differentially associated with metabolic syndrome according to sex in the Korean adult population. The percentage of energy from carbohydrates in men and intake of refined grains, including white rice, in women were associated with metabolic syndrome.

  17. Eddie Mitchell
    Well folks, what a fantastic couple of months for the low carb high fat advocates. Not only for the control of diabetes, but for anyone wanting to follow a healthy lifestyle. The Swedish Government is promoting the cause and two Australian documentaries have well and truly ripped open the can of worms re saturated fat, cholesterol and the gruesome statins. I see a petition has been started in Australia, hoping to bring The Australian Heart Foundation to account, for the extremely poor dietary information they push at the behest of their high carb junk food paymasters. The same dietary madness is promoted by many outfits in the UK. Hiding behind so called charities and skulking in the shadows, they are mercenaries, assassins and thieves. Not only robbing people of their money, but robbing them of their health.

    If you are an insulin using diabetic Doctor Richard Bernstein's book The Diabetes Solution is a must have book. For non insulin using type two diabetics check out Dr. Jay Wortman who's interviews with Andreas have been featured here and are available on utube. Earlier T J Huber said.

    "As a physician (retired) and a diabetic (Type II) I do not agree with your labels of "crazy" and "stupid" for this poor woman's misguided advice. I personally consider it malpractice, bordering on criminal."

    I agree 100%. Would you treat an alcoholic with more booze, or a drug addict with more heroin ? Starchy carbs, are poison to all diabetics. Recommending a high carb diet to a diabetic is madness. But greed and stupidity has usurped common sense, and millions of diabetics have been sent to an early and often painful grave. I believe the tide is turning, all over the world people are learning a diet based on sugar and starch is not the way to stay healthy.

    In my life I have seen some amazing changes. I have witnessed the end of communism in Russia and the Berlin Wall destroyed. I have seen a Black Man become the leader of South Africa, I have seen a Black Man become President of the US. Don't think we cannot bring about a change in the dietary information that has brought about the epidemics of obesity, and it's often linked type two diabetes. Big pharma and multinational food outfits have spent $billions promoting drugs that don't work and food that makes people ill, they will spend more, but they will lose. If history has taught me one thing, it is good always overcomes evil. It just takes time, we have the time, and we must spread the word at every opportunity.

    Think about this, how often does an ordinary man or woman have a chance to save a fellow human being from blindness, limb amputation and kidney failure? By our posting on blogs and forums and spreading the word this is what we are achieving. We are winning and we must keep on working to end the greed and stupidity that has been the downfall of so many.

    Kind regards Eddie

    Reply: #33
  18. Marcy
    Ivor, I agree with you that some people refuse to change their eating habits. I have a friend in the UK with great doctors that always recommend that he go to a dietician and lose weight for his diabetes. He refuses and keeps eating copious amounts of packaged biscuits, cakes and other sweets saying, "I chose to just let the medicines do the work". Well, he was eating so poorly that they just added another medicine to his metformin and he still refuses to change the way he eats.
    Replies: #19, #20
  19. FrankG
    Marcy please consider walking a mile in that other person's shoes... as you rightly say, the dietary advice (if any) is aimed towards "weight loss", which is the wrong focus here. I'll bet if you asked your friend what foods the dietitian etc... had advised, they would be the same as everybody else but in smaller amounts -- including, of course, an "healthy" dose of carbohydrates and minimal saturated fats. But you don't have to give up any of your favourite foods! :-P

    At the same time, and speaking as a Type 2 Diabetic, I can assure you that the very foods we crave when Blood Glucose (BG) is wildly fluctuating -- as it will do on the SAD -- is "food" high in fast energy i.e. sugars and refined starches (packaged biscuits, cakes and other sweets).

    As ever the key is to break the cycle not by a focus on quantity but rather by changing the quality of what we eat.

    Be a good friend and point him towards sites like this http://www.dietdoctor.com/lchf ...with the assurance that he need not go hungry, he can eat tasty, satisfying foods, get off the BG roller-coaster and very likely normalise his excess fat mass (lose weight) with minimal effort. :-)

  20. Paul the rat
    In many instances such an attitude as your friend Marcy, is a sign of resignation/depression - another unexplored field of chronic glucose overload.
  21. Marcy
    Thanks for the insight, Frank, I never thought of what it must feel like to have diabetes. It must be very difficult. I do know this person is also a former heavy smoker and now binge drinker, so I am assuming an addictive personality. I won't judge from now on though thanks to you. My bad. Sorry! I always try to steer him to the LCHF sites, but he is never interested even though he eats meat at least once a day and cheese, butter and eggs. He just can't give up the carbs.
    Reply: #23
  22. Marcy
    Paul the Rat, lightbulb just went off here because of what you said. Could very well be depression. His wife died and he is very alone and lonely now. Right, I bet he is lonely and depressed.
    Reply: #24
  23. FrankG
    Thanks for understanding Marcy :-)

    It is a very hard cycle to break... especially when you see everyone else eating that way and even more so when your Doctor etc... says it is OK like a "normal" person.

    Despite what we know here on this blog, it is clearly going against the grain and why would you do it when what you are doing now gives so much gratification? The best I can suggest is that he try to go cold turkey for a few days... cut out EVERYTHING that lists more than 1gm of carbs per serving but don't go hungry... eat bacon and eggs, fish, steak... whatever he feels like that is below 1gm carbs per serving -- this is what I did after reading Gary Taubes' GC,BC.

    The most startling thing was that: within just 24-48 hours I was no longer constantly craving foods high in sugar or refined starches... sure I could remember what they tasted like but they no longer held any power over me... my "hunger" was getting back to normal as my BG stabilised and, after decades of struggle, I finally felt like I was back in control... working with my body, rather than against it. For motivation I looked to my own long-term health and the idea of running around the garden, playing with my grandchildren for many years to come :-)

  24. Paul the rat
    Hey Marcy buy him a pair of joggers as a x-mass present and encourage him to go for a short jog few times a week
  25. FrankG
    Or just get out walking in nature :-) I'm not big on formal exercise but getting outside each day in the sun, while moving the legs, can work wonders. Maybe he is into photography or bird watching, ballroom dancing or some such?

    Physical activity has naturally become an important part of my day without fighting it, since I adopted an LCHF approach. Before that it was always a struggle (I tried for many decades) and it was the last thing I felt like doing,.. which makes perfect sense now that I understand the biochemistry involved.

    Mood is a big part of the picture... back when my eating was SAD, my son could always tell when my BG was falling before I realised; as I would start to become cranky and irritable.

    Sugar IS a "feel good drug" and we are often told how it fires the same responses as other addictive drugs in the bran. BUT just like those drugs, it is a transient effect and will not sustain you in the long-term... meantime it is destroying your health.

    ---

    Correction: above (#23) should read ...even more so when your Doctor etc... says it is OK to eat like a "normal" person

  26. Damocles
    Since some people have no metabolic problems eating a large amount of carbs, and others do not: Wouldnt it be politically incorrect to suggest people who have problems eating carbs to cut down on them?
    Suggesting medications is the politically correct advice here.
    Even if its not the better solution, it would treat diabetics as beeing equal to metabolically healthy people.
    Reply: #28
  27. Eddie Mitchell
    "Suggesting medications is the politically correct advice here.
    Even if its not the better solution, it would treat deabetics as beeing equal to
    metabilically healty people."

    Diabetics are not the same as metabolically healthy people. So called metabolically healthy people would do well to drastically reduce sugar and carb intake if they want to stay healthy.

    Kind regards Eddie

  28. FrankG
    I read this blog post as being about Diabetes. Are you suggesting that there are a significant proportion of those with Diabetes who do NOT have problems with "eating a large amount of carbs" and for whom LCHF would be bad advice?

    Would you treat a person with IBS, coeliac, or gluten intolerance the same as someone who did not have such a physiological issue?

    Is it politically correct to give peanuts to someone with a peanut allergy? So that they don't feel ostracised from the rest of society, perhaps?!?

  29. FrankG
    I'm not here to threaten anyone's choices, nor tell them how to eat. I'm NOT advocating a cookie-cutter, "one size fits all" approach to diet.

    ALL I am asking for is that: newly diagnosed diabetics be advised about the POTENTIAL benefits of an LCHF approach, along with any other feasible approaches; rather than being scared away with talk of "arterycloggingsaturatedfats" or just encouraged to eat "normally" and cover their meals with injected insulin or other drugs instead. Is that really so unreasonable?

    LCHF works for me.

  30. Eddie Mitchell
    Frank said

    "ALL I am asking for is that: newly diagnosed diabetics be advised about the POTENTIAL benefits of an LCHF approach, along with any other feasible approaches"

    The problem is Frank other than low carb high fat nothing else works. For five years I have been asking healthcare professionals, how do I hold non diabetic BG numbers on two metformin and diet other than low carb, I have yet to receive an answer.

    "Some say I am too strict regarding blood glucose numbers, I have no other choice, nothing else works" Dr. Richard Bernstein

    Kind regards Eddie

    Reply: #34
  31. Paul the rat
    Br J Nutr. 2013 Nov 14:1-11. [Epub ahead of print]

    Rice and noodle consumption is associated with insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia in an Asian population.

    Zuñiga YL, Rebello SA, Oi PL, Zheng H, Lee J, Tai ES, Van Dam RM.
    Source
    Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, 1E Kent Ridge Road, NUHS Tower Block Level 10, Singapore 119228, Singapore.
    Abstract
    High consumption of refined grains, particularly white rice, has been reported to be associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated the association between rice and noodle consumption and markers of glucose homeostasis, inflammation and dyslipidaemia in an Asian population. We carried out a population-based cross-sectional study in 2728 Singaporean Chinese men and women aged between 24 and 92 years. Rice and noodle intake was assessed using a validated FFQ and studied in relation to glycaemic (fasting glucose, glycated Hb, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and HOMA index for β-cell function (HOMA-β)), inflammatory (plasma adiponectin and C-reactive protein (CRP)) and lipid (fasting TAG and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C)) markers. We used multiple linear regression analyses with adjustment for total energy intake and sociodemographic, anthropometric (BMI and waist:hip ratio) and lifestyle factors. Higher rice consumption was found to be associated with higher fasting glucose concentrations (0·81 % higher values per portion increment; 95 % CI 0·09, 1·54) and HOMA-IR (4·62 %; 95 % CI 1·29, 8·07). Higher noodle consumption was also found to be significantly associated with higher fasting glucose concentrations (1·67 %; 95 % CI 0·44, 2·92), HOMA-IR (6·17 %; 95 % CI 0·49, 12·16) and fasting TAG concentrations (9·17 %; 95 % CI 3·44, 15·22). No significant association was observed between rice and noodle consumption and adiponectin, CRP and HDL-C concentrations or HOMA-β in the fully adjusted model.

    These results suggest that high consumption of rice and noodles may contribute to hyperglycaemia through greater insulin resistance and that this relationship is independent of adiposity and systemic inflammation.

  32. Galina L.
    I was commenting about it before, but I guess, i could touch the subject again - we are not firmly divided on diabetics and perfectly healthy people, or even on diabetics, pre-diabetics and normal healthy people, when it comes to our tolerance to carbohydrates in our diets. There are many who are considered to be healthy enough, but do not tolerate well carbs . Such people gain weight easily eating any carbohydrates, their sugar levels follow too-high-too-low pattern, as a result they have big variations in their energy and appetite levels, mood problems, higher susceptibility to infections, and their body system keeps being dis-regulated more as time goes by. Unfortunately, they are not being screened by a conventional medicine, all their standard tests look normal. It is like the difference between a person who have an acute celiac decease and someone who can eat bread, but not without some low-level health issues, like small degree of joins pain or a mild eczema. Anyone can live with that, right? Some steroid cream and pain medicine can take care of symptoms, and you can live normal life and eat that bread like everybody else around you. I try to be a representative of such people who can significantly reduce the amount of their medications by drastically changing their diet. I disagree with the prevalent point of view that taking medications to manage symptoms of not perfect health is the better option than just removing problematic food from consumption without any "ifs" and "buts" and stupid discussions about ortorexia and possible moral damage from eating different than everybody else.
  33. sten
    You wrote in #17: "Think about this, how often does an ordinary man or woman have a chance to save a fellow human being from blindness, limb amputation and kidney failure? By our posting on blogs and forums and spreading the word this is what we are achieving."

    Well said !

  34. FrankG

    The problem is Frank other than low carb high fat nothing else works.

    And I would tend to wholeheartedly agree Eddie but coming from a basis of: we are all responsible adults who should make up our own minds, and that "one size does NOT fit all" I would view it as an huge step forward if health care professional could at the very least offer LCHF as a possible alternative, instead of what I currently see, which is either ignoring its potential, or actively discouraging it as unsafe, untried and unhealthy!

    I also second your "Think about this, how often does an ordinary man or woman have a chance to save a fellow human being from blindness, limb amputation and kidney failure? By our posting on blogs and forums and spreading the word this is what we are achieving." and add that it angers me to have naysayers coming to blogs like this (which promote LCHF) to keep pushing "advice" which IS harming and even killing people.

    Reply: #35
  35. FrankG
    Just to add that: I have the greatest respect and admiration for Dr Bernstein... applying his engineering mindset to the problem and not accepting that diabetes is inevitably a progressive disorder with a predictable outcome... he set out to "fix" himself and through self-testing came up with LCHF long before it became fashionable. Not to mention his pioneering with home BG testing.. despite "establishment" opposition. Even today we still fight with some authorities who try to (shortsightedly) "save money" by cutting back on accessibility to BG testing. Sure... emergency treatment in a coronary care unit, or long term renal dialysis is soo much cheaper than BG test strips!
  36. robert
    Looking at this ( http://www.idf.org/sites/default/files/5E_IDFAtlasPoster_2012_EN.pdf ) - global diabetes prevalence 2012 - makes it quite easy to speculate why this pandemic might be looked at as business opportunity by some corporations, rather than something that should be stopped asap. Most if not all of the governments of course are in bed with them. Probably not publicly, but deep inside the fish is rotten.

    It is the perfect storm.

    And knowing that most of that is solely lifestyle/diet-induced...

  37. Alan
    I don't think most people appreciate the amount of damage from our whole toxic environment--for example, fluoroquinolone antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, levoflocacin, etc, and other classes of antibiotics etc); statins; steroids; etc.; and the some of the industry-produced-80,000 plus chemicals in our environment can cause diabetes. Medicines can cause diabetes which MDs want to treat with more medicines--what a business model. Perhaps this toxic stew is reaching a tipping point in the mitochondria of growing numbers of people?

    Fortunately LCHF is a great way to address these "side effects". It is very interesting that LCHF is beneficial for reducing oxidative stress and increasing mitochondrial function. It seems that LCHF helps a plethora of problems: dental decay, yeast infection, seizures, diabetes, obesity, heart disease risk, cancer, high blood pressure, psychiatric troubles, runaway pharmaceutical profit, risky interactions with clueless MDs, etc.

  38. Emaho
    I can't believe that dLife removed the video of Dr. Bernstein debating a representative of the American Diabetes Assoc. Dr. Wolpert. Dr. Bernstein's goal for most diabetics is for them to have an A1c of around 4.7. But Dr. Wolpert felt that asking patients to try to eat very low carb to achieve an A1c below 6..0 is far to difficult for any patient. Thus, he has decided not to recommend low carb diets even though he agreed that they were the best approach. He felt that it was better to protect his patients' egos from the pain of not being able to follow a very low carb diet.

    My reaction was: Pain! You want Pain, try going blind, try some foot ulcers or how about a heart attack! Who do you think you are God. You don't have the right to decide what kind of pain I will experience. Hurt my ego or destroy my body should be my choice, not my doctor's.

    Why did dLife replace the original video of Bernstein debating Wolberg? The ADA is very powerful. dLife replaced the original video with the following:

    http://www.dlife.com/dlifetv/video/what-is-good-control

  39. Zepp
  40. Paul the rat
    Howard Wolpert makes living by selling insulin; it would be like a car salesman encouraging people who walked into his showroom to use public transport.
  41. Don Devine
    Not counting carbs when you have diabetes is almost suicidal. However, all the other externalities and circumstances in the life of a diabetic, such as activity, stress, glycemic index of foods consumed, sleep, alcohol consumption, time of day, etc., etc., must always be considered. That's why frequent, daily blood glucose testing is essential to managing diabetes. Indeed, as a Type 1, insulin independent diabetic of 40 years, I have found that the forbidden carbs often have negligible effect on glucose levels, and at other times, the same carbs do what they are supposed to do and may raise blood sugar astronomically. There is a variable grey area that must always be respected, otherwise -- following math only -- you end up bolusing for x number of carbs and then find yourself lying in a pool of sweat on the floor.
  42. Marcella
    So scary, this is the exact advice a friend of mine was just given by her doctor who also told her that no matter what changes she tried to make on her own (diet, exercise type changes) would make no difference with her type 2 diabetes. He told her to up the medication and keep happily consuming those sugary sodas and high carb snacks and other foods she loves so much. Of course I know very well she has a doctor who tells her what she wants to hear because she made it clear she is not going to be told to stop eating the way she does and yet she likes to complain about all those medical problems that have nothing to do with all the garbage she puts into herself. She told me her doctor told her that diet has nothing to do with her health problems and she has no reason not to believe him. Yikes! I had to politely nod my head in agreement and walk away. I'll stick with LCHF plan and skip the ill informed medical establishment for dietary advice.
  43. Nan
    AND--now there's the recent suggestion that everyone ( over a fairly young age) should be on statins. Reminds me of the same advice for women and HRT, which I heard from my gyn, then was found to be very wrong.

    We were not meant to age into pill popping middle-aged and older people. My goal is to never take any medicine on a regular basis. I got off the two I was on, and with lchf, I think I can be free from that sentence, with good health all along the way.

    http://www.sugaraholics.com

  44. Ex-diabetic
    I was once like Ivor described when I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in 2001 - all I wanted was to continue my overeating and sedentary lifestyle and simply be given drugs. Luckily this mentality lasted only a day or two, and having built some powerful mental tools, shed 40 Kg, got slim and fit, and also achieved normal blood sugar levels. And maintained it ever since.

    It was Nan's post that triggered me to write - last year my former obese lifestyle hit back and I needed heart bypass surgery. Of course I was put on statins even though I already had excellent cholesterol values. Recently I defiantly stopped taking statins (see http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/why_statins_dont_really_work.html) and have now taken my carbohydrate consumption even lower. I am increasingly become a vocative low-carb and anti-statin advocate, both for blood glucose and heart health reasons.

  45. Lori
    You know, the patient's feelings should be considered too. For some more than others, food choice is a quality of life issue. I think doctors should provide clear patient education, defining as much as possible the risks/benefits of either approach (or a compromise - some of each) but ultimately the patient should decide.
  46. Galina L.
    So far no one forces patients to follow any particular diet or to stop smoking and to start exercising, and only a patient decides. Who else, if we are talking about an independent adult?Do you think that any choice should be equally respected? It is possible only if no one gives a shit about you.

    Many people who comment here think that their quality of life is affected more by the way how they feel than how similar their diet is to what others consume. There are very tasty foods low in carbohydrates, most report the disappearance of cravings for sweets very fast, appetite is well controlled by a LC diet, so the main issue is inconvenience, and probably more work with cooking (i.e. not being lazy).

    I am not a diabetic, I need a LC diet mostly to control migraines and to have no mood-swings and other menopausal issues , like hot flashes. I enjoy so much my stable mood and energy level, invisibility to stress and seasonal flues, how my clothes fit after 30 lbs were gone, the lack of a leg edema. Like everybody else, sometimes I eat outside my diet, each time it makes me miserable for much longer than it took to consume that standard food, so the longer I avoid sweets and starches, the more I get used to it. It is like I am addicted to feeling good and looking good. People could choose standard sweets and baked goods (you can make LC versions of almost anything) over health and good looks, but in the eyes of many who value their health the most, it would look as respectable choice, as the choice to be an alcoholic .

  47. Gill P
    I am not diabetic but two of my husband's sisters are. We went to visit them this week and I told them about the LCHF diet. They said "I couldn't give up bread or potatoes". One of the sisters has to inject herself four times a day! The other one said that she wouldn't be able to do that and would have to have the nurse to do it! I didn't know what to say.

    They all said I looked good - I've lost nearly a stone (13 lbs) in three months.

    Reply: #48
  48. Zepp
    Then you should give them this book as a christmas gift!

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Diabetes-No-Thanks-Scandinavian-Diet/dp/19080...

    Writen of a diabetic to other diabetics!

    Most people cant make a differens betwen a carbohydrate and a calorie.. and dont even understand why they should!

    This book is perticaly writen to make diabetics and there relatives to understand that they can take control of there healt.

  49. IvorGoodbody
    Dear Frank

    I applaud and share your desire to show compassion, not moral or other condemnation, towards diabetics struggling with their condition.

    But I would point out you answer your own argument. On the one hand, you say: "In my experience, people generally live up, or down, to the expectations placed on them. Now sure, we are all responsible adults but when an health care professional talks, most folks still listen -- especially while still reeling from the shock of an scary diagnosis."

    On the other hand, you rightly observe: "Constant, driving, cellular hunger, is as hard to resist as the need to suck in air if you are forced to hold your breath."

    And it my observation, it is this constant, irresistible force than nearly always overwhelms the shock felt after the diagnosis, or good intentions temporarily formed as a result of it. At least, it has in the case of the diabetics I know personally.

    My reason for posting this a year after our initial conversation? One of those friends - the one who'd eat whole bread baskets at a sitting, and sustained his heavy beer and wine drinking after diagnosis - has just suffered a heart attack, followed by a stroke and a diagnosis of kidney cancer. He is now drinking again, albeit less, and so far as I know, his eating habits are unchanged.

    Nothing his doctors have advised looks likely to change this. He is of course only a sample of one, but research suggests one-third to one-half of all patients are non-compliant with their doctors' advice and/or prescriptions, resulting in anything from one-third to two-thirds of med-related hospital admissions in the US and $300 billion of annual additional healthcare costs in the US alone:

    http://www.pharmaphorum.com/articles/rethinking-patient-noncompliance...

    As the article emphasises, this should not be a blame game, but an exercise in seeing things as they really are, and thus taking countermeasures which are actually likely to correct the problem rather than misidentifying it altogether.

    Wishing you enduring health

    Ivor

  50. D D Ferreira
    Spot on. Same applies to ADHD.
  51. Ivor Goodbody
    I am sad to report that my diabetic friend, who was struck down with so many simultaneous ailments last October, died yesterday. I have since discovered that even prior to his heart attack he was suffering from undiagnosed melanoma.

    I still do not notice any change in the habits of my other diabetic friend, who was even closer to him than I was, but continues to smoke, drink too much, eat all the wrong foods and do little to no regular exercise, despite this unmistakable reminder of the possible consequences...

    We poor humans are wilful and often self-deceiving creatures, I fear.

    Wishing you enduring health

    Ivor Goodbody

Leave a reply

Reply to comment #0 by

Older posts