Can You Prevent Cancer with Millions of Cinnamon Buns?

Cancer for dessert

Cancer for dessert

Today is “Cinnamon Bun Day” in Sweden, and October is breast cancer awareness month. Is it reasonable that the Swedish Cancer Society runs a health campaign with one of Sweden’s biggest bun bakery?

Send a Bunogram in partnership with the Swedish Cancer Society and the Pink Ribbon (Google translated from Swedish)

Excerpt from a press release from the bakery: (Google translated from Swedish)

Last year Bonjour sold a grand total of 3.6 million cinnamon buns during the month of October. This year we have expanded our partnership with the Swedish Cancer Society and the Pink Ribbon, which substantially revises the expected outcome upwards. This year the business anticipates that as many as 5.4 million pink cinnamon buns will be eaten in Sweden during the month of October. [my bold]

Will the Cancer Society really prevent poor health by getting people to eat millions of extra cinnamon buns? The whole thing seems quite ill-considered in the midst of an obesity epidemic. Especially as obesity carries with it a greatly increased risk of, for example breast cancer, which the Cancer Society and the Pink Ribbon are supposed to fight. Contributing to a massive increase in the consumption of cinnamon buns then seems counterproductive.

Not surprisingly, there’s even a study showing that Swedes who eat more baked sweet goods have a higher incidence of cancer.

How are they thinking about this cinnamon bun campaign? Probably they’re just clueless.

More

Lowering Insulin Slows Cancer Growth

CBN: Using a Ketogenic Diet to Starve Cancer

32 Comments

Top Comment

  1. Lee
    Wow, sugar in mustard -- what an awful-sounding concoction! It made me laugh. Here in the USA mustard is about the only thing we DON'T put sugar in. My favorite is a good, strong spicy brown mustard with horseradish, which is so popular they even sell it as a generic.

    I started LCHF in July -- weaned myself off added sugar over a few days. Went on vacation and headed to our favorite ice cream stand and was really looking forward to it. Imagine my disappointment when I found the ice cream way too sweet and got a headache (not a brain freeze headache) not too long after I finished my big scoop. Felt almost like a hangover. I still miss not being able to eat fruit as I wish. Oh well -- it's worth it as my A1C went from 8.4 to 5.5.

    In the USA, everything has the stupid pink ribbon on it, it's quite a racket even though the major fundraiser for breast cancer was disgraced by some of their anti-women tactics. Here the pink ribbon is for breast cancer awareness, not general cancer awareness. They raise lots of money and slap pink ribbons on the damnedest things (cake, cookies, ice cream, gasoline brands, football jerseys ... but not broccoli or kale or anything that might actually help prevent cancer) and of all the money raised, very very little goes to either breast cancer research or to treating women with breast cancer. Other cancers don't have such a good public relations apparatus in place even though other cancers (and heart disease) kill more women than breast cancer. I call it pinkwashing (like greenwashing, for products manufacturers want to label as eco-friendly by paying for some carbon offsets that mostly do nothing).

    Read more →

All Comments

  1. FrankG
    I think that with most of these promotions the motivation is in the right place: trying to increase awareness and raise money BUT I agree that the message is all wrong. Especially where Breast Cancer is one of the majority of cancers where high BGs seem to feed the tumour while the high insulin helps it to grow.

    From the perspective of us knowing the health benefits of LCHF, compared to the health costs of a diet fueled by sugar and refined starches, this is plain barmy..! On the other hand our society in general currently looks to food such as this, as a "treat" or a "reward".

    This kind if food might be OK as an occasional treat -- and by "occasional" I do mean Birthdays, Xmas etc... but probably not as the every day staple they seem to have become for too many.

    I expect this to be a gradual change at first but hopefully, quickly gaining momentum after that -- much as happened with social attitudes towards smoking... heck it is not that long since we had MDs promoting the health benefits of cigarettes!

  2. Daci
    This is shocking! Maybe you could give the heads of this a little talk...Instead of buns,maybe they might go with a jar of ghee?
  3. eddy
    Don't think so. The Canadian Broadcasting Corp is doing a big expose tonight on their program the Fifth estate exposing recent research that links sugar to alzheimers!!

    as well as cancer and diabetes. The sugar industry reps are in denial. This reminds me of the tobacco companies denial that their product was not only addictive but unhealthy.

    hopefully this will end up on you tube after it airs.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/how-toxic-is-sugar-1.1894262

    Reply: #8
  4. eddy
    sugar and its link to diabetes of the brain
    http://ca.news.yahoo.com/toxic-sugar-090103191.html
  5. sten
    Since it has been known for decades that it is impossible to get cancer when people have the "Laron syndrome" , cancer research collections are pure charades.
    The explosively simple mechanisms involved and how this effects all of us are already known but we are not told about it.

    The sufferers of the so called "Laron Syndrome" become dwarfs when untreated. They miss something that the rest of us have plenty of, called free Insulin Growth Factor -1 (IGF-1). When they get it in the right years they can grow as the rest of us, else they won't.
    But these people without free IGF-1 never get cancer ! irrespectively how much junk food they eat . Yet their relatives that eat the same food die of cancer in the same terrifying proportions that most of us now do.

    Natural IGF-1 levels are controlled by a "Binding Protein", and when its levels get low, the free IGF-1 can cause ", "uncontrolled growth", which is one definition of cancer.
    Pharma companies has invested lots of money to find out how it works and if a profitable pill could be made, but no known (1) successes todate.
    The key not well known aspect of the IGF-1 is that every time our blood sugar rises high, the level of the binding protein is reduced in some proportion to the excess over normal.
    Say BS5.5 -nil, BS6.5 is one, BS7.5 is two and BS 8.5 is 3, etc. (It is easy to reach 8 and 9 for a while, being healthy on a standard meal. The older one is usually higher and longer spikes)

    So when we eat something containing fast carbs, be it sweets, soda or a hamburger with bread, ketchup and mustard, the blood sugar goes way over the limit at which the IGF-1 Binding Protein is reduced resulting in that bad uncontrolled growths then get a kick in the bad direction. The rest becomes a matter of repetitions and stress, which also can raise blood sugar substantially.

    But Joe Soap and his wife were never told. Their cancers were said to be , if not genetical, an "act of god" or bad luck or passive smoking, and there was nothing they could do, as now soon every 4th or 5th person are eventually struck down like that, by an invisible sword.

    Please never ever give those collectors another penny to perpetuate the lies about "cancer research"! Spread the word that the pharma companies have kept for themselves instead.

    Reply: #7
  6. Galina L.
    @eddy,
    Canadian message is rather confusing. They now warn about danger of fat, sodium AND sugar. Does it make wholegrain crackers a healthy food? Probably yes.
  7. bill
    sten said:

    "...and mustard..."

    Say it ain't so. Mustards commonly don't have
    much carbs or any added sugars.

    Otherwise, your post is very well said. It is why
    I try to keep to a ketogenic diet.

    Replies: #10, #11, #14
  8. Sophie
    Eddy I am starting to watch the doc right now! It's just starting on the CBC. Will report back!

    It'S called the Secrets of Sugar!

  9. francois
    This kind of partnership is partly responsible for obesity, starting with children. I invite readers to take a look at a conference by my colleague Yoni Friedhoff of weighty matters.ca. You can see it at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0lXmwgVX_Uo#t=29

    Sten has hit an interesting point with IGF-1. But there is more. Insulin is the orchestra chief of a series of hormones. When insulin goes up, IGF-1 goes up and IGF-1 stimulates growth of all cells, including cancer cells. This may also explain the fact the age of puberty starts earlier and earlier... Insulin also decreases another hormone, IGFBP-3, whose role is to tell cancer cells to commit suicide (a goof thing). More insulin, more IGF-1, more cancer cell growth, more insulin, less IGFBP-3, less cancer death (a bad thing).

    There is even more. While your normal cells can strive on ketone bodies (us low carbers know this), cancer cells CANNOT. They need glucose to grow. So if you eat a ketogenic diet, you will starve cancer. Add a ketogenic diet to conventional cancer treatment and you have a win-win situation.

    But eat cinnamon buns (or any other type of carb-laden crap) and you will promote cancer growth. Looks like we are flirting with the devil! I'll stick to a ketogenic diet.

    Reply: #12
  10. sten
    Bill, many thanks for your comment!
    And you are right as I did not specify the type of mustard: The Swedish popular variant "Slottssenap" comes with 14% sugar, total carbs 22% !
    It is also milder (due to the sugar ??) so no wonder we loved lots of it as kids and thought the English and French were way too strong as we didn't appreciate how little of that was required and what mustard taste really should be when not camouflaged by sugar!
    For ketchup total carbs are 24% so the sugar content is in parity with or possibly higher than in mustard.

    (Slottssenap by Unilever in Sweden. They do not declare omega-x of the fat so probably it is omega -6, although only 6%)

  11. Zepp
    Then you should taste Swedish mustard.. a lot of sugar in it!

    And I use mostly French Dijon mustard.. becuse one dont want sugar but the heat of spices.. from mustard.

    Why should any one have sugar in mustard?

  12. sten
    Francois, good that you added more mechanisms! Have you any links to more about the different binding proteins ? The lowered puberty aged is very likely related to increased fast carb consumption with fast breakfast cereals (a food where added sugar has the lowest GI !) made worse with light milk which is half the sugar strength of Soda (5% lactose) without balancing fat, followed by low fat food and more light milk to school lunch!

    Apart from avoiding most insulin related cancer promoting stuff there is still more advantages with ketogenic diets , yet a "late started" ketogenic diet may not be enough to keep cancer away, or heart disease to not emerging/return...
    With the metabolic syndrome present (overweight, diabetes, heartdisease) and one goes ketogenic, most symptoms disappears as many of us have seen, but the condition is often still there in the background. (The younger the less..) This is very easy to test by checking morning blood sugar over a few days, but without exercise 2 days before or alcohol the night before. (Else levels look better than they are...)
    If such morning BS is too high (over 5.5 (or 100)) it is usually a consequence of that pancreas is not in tune and delivers too much glucagon which makes the liver produce blood glucose to levels not needed which in turn raises insulin which then can and will restart original subject matter, the insulin and possibly cancer dance, again.
    A Dr Taylor from Newcastle (UK) has however recently linked the metabolic syndrome tighter to visceral fat and organ fat than ever before! And he has restored blood sugar regulation by reducing same fats by once off extremely reduced diet, in effect forcing the burning of the visceral fats. Even as short as 10 days for a newly diagnosed diabetic. The visceral fat around the pancreas reduced from 8% to 6% which means a 25% reduction.

    In other words a more or less complete system to avoid and possibly cure cancer exists.
    That common heart disease goes out the door at the same time should be of no surprise
    but the interesting reasons for that have to wait to other posts.

    Reply: #17
  13. Paul
    It's not quite the same circumstances but a similar thing is happening here in the UK with Diabetes UK,the charity and voice for diabetics,they are holding a Tea party and on the menu is cakes,scones and sandwiches which is far from being suitable for diabetics and as a diabetes charity they should be setting a good example and all events should reflect this through low carb and fresh food options IMO
  14. JAUS
    All swedish mustards have sugar or honey in them, it's what separate them from French and English mustards. Finnish mustards are also sweetened, but are stronger than swedish mustards.

    I use imported American mustard ("French's" is the name) that has no sugar and sweeten it with sucralose. I also make my own ketchup of tomato paste, white vinegar, sucralose, salt and spices. We have stevia ketchup here in Sweden, but I rather use sucralose since it's well tested and I know that it's safe.

    And no, just because stevia is natural doesn't make it better than sucralose: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUo2XW0z218

    Reply: #15
  15. sten
    Jaus, Dr Mercola disagrees about safety of sucralose and also splenda ,and of course aspartame.
    http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2000/12/03/sucralo...

    In my 20's we were out of sugar and had to take coffee for a week without it.
    When we delighted got the sugar back I spitted out what tasted as hot sugar water, never any sugar in coffee since then.
    When one take out sugar the cravings go rather soon and then natural sweetness can easy be
    appreciated. The sweetest I ever eat today is tomatoes or red peppers and I think they are really sweet ! Just a few years ago I could indulge in dried figs. Now I know they are 60% sugar (and more fructose than glucose..). That means for me really only good as emergency rations during severe food shortage. And they also keep !

  16. eddy
    This CBC Blog for the fifth highlights some of what was brought to the publics attention last night

    http://www.cbc.ca/fifth/episodes/2013-2014/the-secrets-of-sugar

  17. François
    Sten,

    I retrieved the info as far as I can recall from a basic endocrinology textbook I got at the University to write an article in a medical journal. I unfortunately do not recall the name of the textbook. If you read french, you can access the original article online at http://www.stacommunications.com/journals/leclinicien/archive2012.html. It is in the June 2012 edition, "Prévenir le cancer : Utopie ou réalité? Les facteurs de risque imposants" - Prevent cancer: utopia or reality?

    Now. Though you are right in stating that "the sooner the better" for a ketogenic diet, it still is possible to get incredible results with cancer (including metastatic cancer) with a ketogenoc diet. You can take a look at: Starving Cancer: Ketogenic Diet a Key to Recovery - found at http://www.cbn.com/cbnnews/healthscience/2012/december/starving-cance...
    For a scientific article, please see:
    Future Oncol. 2013 Jul;9(7):959-76. doi: 10.2217/fon.13.31.
    Selectively starving cancer cells through dietary manipulation: methods and clinical implications.
    Simone BA, Champ CE, Rosenberg AL, Berger AC, Monti DA, Dicker AP, Simone NL.

    I hope this helps.

    Reply: #19
  18. Lee
    Wow, sugar in mustard -- what an awful-sounding concoction! It made me laugh. Here in the USA mustard is about the only thing we DON'T put sugar in. My favorite is a good, strong spicy brown mustard with horseradish, which is so popular they even sell it as a generic.

    I started LCHF in July -- weaned myself off added sugar over a few days. Went on vacation and headed to our favorite ice cream stand and was really looking forward to it. Imagine my disappointment when I found the ice cream way too sweet and got a headache (not a brain freeze headache) not too long after I finished my big scoop. Felt almost like a hangover. I still miss not being able to eat fruit as I wish. Oh well -- it's worth it as my A1C went from 8.4 to 5.5.

    In the USA, everything has the stupid pink ribbon on it, it's quite a racket even though the major fundraiser for breast cancer was disgraced by some of their anti-women tactics. Here the pink ribbon is for breast cancer awareness, not general cancer awareness. They raise lots of money and slap pink ribbons on the damnedest things (cake, cookies, ice cream, gasoline brands, football jerseys ... but not broccoli or kale or anything that might actually help prevent cancer) and of all the money raised, very very little goes to either breast cancer research or to treating women with breast cancer. Other cancers don't have such a good public relations apparatus in place even though other cancers (and heart disease) kill more women than breast cancer. I call it pinkwashing (like greenwashing, for products manufacturers want to label as eco-friendly by paying for some carbon offsets that mostly do nothing).

  19. sten
    Francois,
    I have seen most of the info in the 2nd article before, and I have asked a sister who lives in France to translate the article in the first link. Thanks!

    There is however plenty of room to get also a ketogenic diet to go awry... , and it relates to the metabolic syndrome or visceral fat, or to be more specific to poorly regulated blood sugar, commonly experienced after a year or more on ketogenic diet in the form of weight plateaus.

    A simple way to know if the metabolic syndrome is present bad enough is to check fasting blood glucose every morning over a week on a ketogenic diet. Discount low fasting blood sugar values after intense exercise or a few glasses of wine(alcohol) or very low protein intake the day before, as the fasting blood sugar values would be lower due to these circumstances that all restrict the liver supply glucose to the "set point".
    The "set point" is in the pancreas that releases glucagon right up to it.

    Without sorting out this set point blood sugar and insulin will remain too high resulting in far too low ketone levels even on a perfect ketogenic diet !
    Since the metabolic syndrome is rare in children the best successes with ketogenic diets have been treating child epilepsy. what I know.
    (It is essential to avoid omega-6 fats at is a suspect cause of the metabolic syndrome !)

    It is possible to reset pancreas function, or Dr Taylor, Newcastle UK has shown this by means of removing visceral fat around and in organs, through a special diet.
    Having cancer and then first embarking on a Taylorian starvation diet for a month or more if required to later be sure that the ketogenic (non-starvation!) diet will work long term is a small price. At least it must provide a substantially brighter prospect than chemo, or worse the later Cachexia, when cancer is allowed to progress and consume all for itself.
    The only difference to Taylor's approch I would make is to choose food during the starvation period as much as possible carb free to make also this part ketogenic, to not lose any time.

    Reply: #24
  20. Murray
    Nice thread Sten and Francois. Helpful. Sten, regarding set point, if one does not have visceral fat around the pancreas and morning blood glucose varies between 3.8 and 4.8 mmol/LI presume from your description that there is no set point issue. I measure daily and ketones vary from 1.0 to 3.5, but I didn't realize these might be so affected by exercise and diet (to look misleadingly better). I presume consuming coconut oil or MCT oil might also paint a misleadingly favourable ketone reading as well.

    The Canadian CBC production on sugar (see http://www.cbc.ca at Fifth Estate) is good.

    Reply: #21
  21. sten
    With that morning BS and ketone readings you must be well out of danger zones for both cancer and for CVD. (Check what Dr William Davies writes about connection plaque- blood sugar and you are reducing any (remaining) plaque daily according to his standards, which I have no reason to doubt ! )

    MCT oils of course raise ketones but I know of no effect that has on BS. IF MCT oils reduce blood sugar it makes them even better, yet I have no idea.
    I think your link went to a page with transient headings...

    Reply: #25
  22. FrankG
    @Sten I much prefer your approach of not starving yourself as they do in Dr Taylor's trial and I'd also offer the caveat that I suspect his protocol would be more effective in someone newly diagnosed (or even earlier if possible) than someone who has been diagnosed and following the current standard dietary advice for a while (years). Of course a change to LCHF at any stage, I think, stands a good chance to reap some degree of benefits in these cases but some damage (much like scar tissue) may not be reversible.
  23. Eric Anderson
    YES WE CAN!

    yes; eating lots of sugar will in many cases lead to death from heart disease or diabetis before death from cancer. The question of did the cancer develope but not have time to kill the person before the sugar asissted or quickened death migh be open to debate or an autopsy! Eric

  24. Francois
    Sten,

    The best - in my opinion - scientific blog on the ketogenic diet and the state of ketosis is a blog by my colleague Peter Attia: http://www.eatingacademy.com. Just search ketosis and ketogenic diet and you will have more answers than you have questions.

    As to the protective and therapeutic effect of a ketogenic diet in cancer, plee see below an excerpt of a book I'm writing on nutrition. You may find this interesting. I hope.

    Diabetes… A number of studies have linked diabetes and cancer.

    While “Diabetes affects blood vessels and can cause a number of “vascular” complications like heart attack, stroke, blindness, gangrene and loss of limb, kidney disease and sexual dysfunction, diabetes has now been associated with other complications unrelated to blood vessels like cancer (of the liver, pancreas, ovary, colorectum or bowel, lung, bladder and breast) as well as other diseases like kidney and liver disease, lung disease (pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), other infectious diseases, digestive diseases (besides those affecting the liver), external causes, mental disorders, intentional self-harm and nervous system disorders. And there is even more: “patients with DM are not only at higher risk of developing certain malignancies but also at higher risk of mortality once they develop a malignancy”

    A fascinating discovery may show at least one of the mechanisms by which diabetes – and high insulin levels, which happen far before diabetes appears – could cause cancer. Elevated levels of insulin cause another hormone, “insulin-like growth factor one or IGF-1” to increase in the blood while decreasing another hormone, “insulin-like binding protein three or IGFBP-3”. IGF-1 affects all tissues and induces strong tissue growth. Elevated levels of IGF-1 can explain the fact that puberty appears much earlier than it did fifty years ago. But IGF-1 stimulates all cells to grow, including tumor cells. On the other hand, IGFBP-3 prevents unregulated tissue growth and its presence induces apoptosis (cellular death) in cancer cells. So high insulin levels induced by constant intake of high glycemic index carbs increases a hormone that helps cancer cells grow, while decreasing another hormone that prevents them from growing and makes them die. High IGF-1 and low IGFBP-3 levels have clearly been associated with breast cancer in premenopausal women, prostate cancer in men and colorectal cancer in all. Are there other mechanisms by which diabetes and high insulin levels would induce cancer? Maybe. Research will eventually show us.

    On an average, adults at 50 years of age with diabetes without known vascular disease are about 6 years younger at the time of their death compared to adults without diabetes. About 40% of the years of life lost from diabetes are due to nonvascular causes, out of which 10% are due to cancer deaths.”

    Actually, it is even worse: cancer cells have a high affinity for sugar and eat it at a rate 8 times that of normal cells.

    “Compared to normal cells, cancer cells have a prodigious appetite for glucose, the result of a shift in cell metabolism known as aerobic glycolysis or the "Warburg effect." Researchers focusing on this effect as a possible target for cancer therapies have examined how biochemical signals present in cancer cells regulate the altered metabolic state.”
    (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120626131854.htm)

    Researchers have thus proven that cells that need glucose in order to survive can be destroyed by glucose restriction. In a rather elegant paper, Graham et al. state that:
    “glucose withdrawal activates a positive feedback loop involving generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidase and mitochondria, inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases by oxidation, and increased tyrosine kinase signaling. In cells dependent on glucose for survival, glucose withdrawal-induced ROS generation and tyrosine kinase signaling synergize to amplify ROS levels, ultimately resulting in ROS-mediated cell death.”(Graham et al., 2012)

    Santisteban et al. conducted a study in 1985 where they fed three different types of diets to mice suffering from mammary tumors. What they found was eye-opening: the higher the average blood glucose, as measured by glycated haemoglobin , the faster the rate of tumor development and the quicker the animals would die of their cancer. There was no “safe” level: even mice with “normal” average blood sugars died earlier than mice with “low” average blood sugar.

    And it makes sense! Cancer cells (all cancer cells) love sugar and need it to grow. Normal cells can live perfectly well without glucose and can strive on either ketone bodies or fatty acids. Cancer cells cannot. They only can process glucose as energy. The lower the blood glucose, the more it will be difficult for the cancer to grow. By switching to a ketogenic diet, very low in sugar, some people have starved their cancer and are now healthy. This “cancer starvation ” technique can be combined with every conventional medical treatment. (See Santisteban GA et al., 1985 and Poff AM et al., 2013).

    “We have dramatically increased survival with metabolic therapy (ketogenic diet). So we think it's important to get this information out. It's not just lab mice. I've been in correspondence with a number of people, At least a dozen over the last year-and-a-half to two years, and all of them are still alive, despite the odds. So this is very encouraging.”
    (Dr. Dominic D’Agostino, Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, United States of America, 2 Department of Biology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, United States.)

    Poff AM, Ari C, Seyfried TN, D'Agostino DP. The ketogenic diet and hyperbaric oxygen therapy prolong survival in mice with systemic metastatic cancer. PLoS One. 2013 Jun 5;8(6):e65522. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0065522. Print 2013.

    Santisteban GA, Ely JT, Hamel EE, Read DH, Kozawa SM. Glycemic modulation of tumor tolerance in a mouse model of breast cancer. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1985 Nov 15;132(3):1174-9.

    The following article has nothing to do with cancer but is interesting for Alzheimer…
    Samuel T. Henderson, Ketone Bodies as a Therapeutic for Alzheimer’s Disease Accera Inc., Vol. 5, 470–480, July 2008 ˝ The American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics, Inc.

    I'm sorry the graphs cannot copy in a blog response. The one I made out of the Sansisteban is rather impressive, showing a steep straight line. The lower the better for blood sugar and there is no plateau.

  25. murray
    Sorry about the link, Sten. Try this. http://www.cbc.ca/fifth/
    Reply: #27
  26. Jonas Larsson
    I thought cinnamon products have the ubiquitous ingredient called coumarin.Wrong?It is mainly found in higher concentrations in the types of cinnamon grouped together under the name 'cassia cinnamon'.Given the high levels of coumarin measured,it is advisable to only eat moderate amounts of cinnamon-containing foods, particularly in the run-up to Christmas.And this cinnamon bun idea,especially coming from the Cancer Society,is no doubt a bad idea.Could there be any financial motive in the move between the bakery and society?We would never know.
  27. sten
    Thanks.
    Tried it. Video comes on and lasts for 3 secs while a sterile voice goes: "...This content is currently unavailable..."
    Anything on you tube or do we have a blackout ?
    Or transcript?
    Reply: #28
  28. murray
    Not sure what the issue is. I just checked and it played on my computer. I am in Canada, if that makes a difference. I didn't see a transcript on the website.
  29. Eric Anderson
    Ref IGF-1

    Does anyone else besides me have IGF-1 tested?
    I watch my protein intake. My IGF-1 is low so I have read less than 1 in a million chance of cancer or heart attack if IGF-1 is in the lowest quintile.

    LCHF leads to lower fasting glucose, insulin and IGF-1
    Add intermittent fasting or at minimum protein cycling
    (Ron Mignery PhD) http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/REMIG

    Worth a read as he explians the biology and chemistry in a most readable fashion.

    Restricting dietary protein helps keep glucose and insulin and IGF-1 levels lower as less gluconeogenesis happens than when excessive protein intake happens.

    Mifnery's e-book (and my lab results for me as an N of 1) makes a case for lowered protein inatke one or two or three days a week.

    I would love to see a study of the biomarkes on a version of intermittent fasting vs ketogentic with an every other day less than 25 grams of protein diet.

    Ketogenic and protein cycling is what makes sense to me and has resulted in great fasting blood sugars, insulin, IGF-1 and lots of autophagy given the labs and eating style.

    Eric

  30. sten
    Eric, that's great to hear that it is is possible to check IGF-1 !
    I will check your link !
    I already think I mentioned "masking agents" like low protein, some alcohol and exercise. They have in common that morning sugar become lower than otherwise (and ketones higher..), no bad thing, but I think the road to sort out pancreas producing excess glucagon could then be obscured and long term that organ must be addressed in my opinion.
    See my post #19 above about a permanent solution to the problem!

    It is yet possible that low protein every 2nd day could do something, although immediately BS reading the day after protein restriction becomes artificially lower since "raw material" to produce blood glucose" has simply been restricted. Alcohol has same net effect, but then it is liver production capacity that has been restricted. (Interval) exercise same net effect due to filling empty(?) glycogen depots or bulding muscles after. All above on ketogenic diet only.

    But if after a week on normal ketogenic diet the fasting BS is same as on the protein cycling diet I say it works fine !
    Also note that fingerpricking may show local readings lower than body average... Dr William Davies (Wheatbelly, trackyourplaque) has pointed out this I recall. Lift arms high a few secs twice before testing! My 3.9 BS readings then became 4.9....

    Personally I aim to restore my blood sugar regulation and waist to what it was long before my CVD and then eat a moderate LCHF for the rest of my life. Waist from 108 to 99, target: 90.

  31. Myfanwy
    Streaky bacon. You could make a really good lookin' ribbon with some streaky....
  32. Dina
    Not only in Sweden! It seems Israel is doing the same odd awareness campaign using cookies ... :-(

    http://www.jpost.com/National-News/Bakeries-join-up-with-NGO-in-Breas...

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