Another Dreadful Low-Fat Product

yoghurt2

Now I’m back in Sweden again, with good access to the internet, after three weeks of travelling in America. Thus there’ll be more regular updates again.

Here’s a quick example of how bad low-fat products can be for your health. It’s nothing new, but even worse than what I’ve seen back home.

Here’s yogurt served at breakfast on the cruise last week. Notice that all of them except the plain one have the words “low fat” on the top. It sounds healthy – but it’s not. Have a look:

Yoghurt

The low-fat yogurt contains almost no fat. Instead it’s filled with sugar and modified starch, rapidly absorbed bad carbs. And not a little: 22 grams per 113 gram serving.

About 70 percent of the energy in the yogurt is pure sugar. And it’s very noticable: it tastes like eating candy for breakfast.

The reality is that the manufacturers have removed 2 grams of fat from the container of yogurt. Then they’ve added about 15 grams of sugar, seven times more, and they sell it implying that it’s healthy for you.

Is anyone surprised that there are three times more obese Americans today, compared to when the fear of fat took hold back in the 1980’s?

Earlier about failed low-fat diets

30 comments

Top comments

  1. When out shopping if I see anything with a label that says 'low fat' I now automatically think that means 'high sugar', and I avoid buying it. Please avoid low fat products you owe it to yourself!
    The way to go is a low carb, high fat lifestyle.
    Read more →
  2. Deb
    i had a very public stand up argument with my local supermarket manager when they stopped stocking the full fat version of my sons favourite yoghurt, i've always bought full fat yoghurt for my kid, he's 17 and needs all the fat he can get (pretty much eats as a full time job) - the manager tried to convince me it was healthier and i had to actually show him the nutrition panel on a full fat gourmet yoghurt to demonstrate the difference, he was genuinely surprised and promised to reorder the full fat version the following week.
    Read more →

All comments

  1. FrankG
    Possibly the worst thing about these is the way they are portrayed and apparently perceived by so many, as the "healthy choice"
  2. Because nearly nobody notices the ingredient label, obesity rates are still rising.
  3. Wasn't this a low-carb cruise?? What was that yogurt even doing there?? I'm surprised there wasn't a mutiny!
  4. Paul
    I don't understand why the food on a low-carb cruise wasn't amazing LCHF/paleo food for all!
    What's going on?
    Did you get served bread aswell?!?!?
    Did the caterers wonder why nobody wanted to eat?!?!?
    Reply: #12
  5. When out shopping if I see anything with a label that says 'low fat' I now automatically think that means 'high sugar', and I avoid buying it. Please avoid low fat products you owe it to yourself!
    The way to go is a low carb, high fat lifestyle.
  6. 1 comment removed
  7. FrankG
    Same here Jan -- not that I buy much if any, food at the supermarket these days -- but anything that tries to portray itself as "healthy" is like a red flag to me... avoid at all costs!

    Also to point out that I don't think the LCHF folks had the entire cruise-ship to themselves :-)

  8. Emma
    What are water and whey concentrate doing in yogurt, anyway? Sugary yogurt is one of my most hated foods because of the halo of health the stuff holds, even when it's basically like eating melted ice-cream.

    Being a Fin, my other pet peeve food is Karelian pies, which is basically rice porridge in a thin rye-wheat shell, manufactured with cheap vegetable fats. They are tasty, cheap as dirt, and also have a huge halo of being "healthy". They have rye in them, and that makes everything good, right?

  9. You'll enjoy this advertisement from Australia about low-fat yoghurt - the ad is fake but the product is very real (unfortunately) - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HUPMAlNHBiU
    Reply: #10
  10. Zepp
    Haha.. I got cramp by all laughing.. must take some magnesium!

    I gonaa copy it and play it on swedish forums.. gonna be a high sale of magnesium!

  11. Becky
    I live in Texas and found ONE store that sells full fat yogurt. We have at least eight stores that only carry the low fat yogurt.
  12. murray
    tobi, Paul. Unfortunately, the low-carb people on these annual cruises as yet do not fill the entire cruise ship and so don't control what gets set out on the buffets.
    Reply: #27
  13. Deb
    i had a very public stand up argument with my local supermarket manager when they stopped stocking the full fat version of my sons favourite yoghurt, i've always bought full fat yoghurt for my kid, he's 17 and needs all the fat he can get (pretty much eats as a full time job) - the manager tried to convince me it was healthier and i had to actually show him the nutrition panel on a full fat gourmet yoghurt to demonstrate the difference, he was genuinely surprised and promised to reorder the full fat version the following week.
  14. murray
    Becky, so sadddening so little selection.

    Here in Toronto, I get all sorts of yoghurts (all plain, of course). Our flavour favourite is full-fat yoghurt from sheep's milk (6% milk fat) sourced from old-order Mennonite farms from sheep not fed silage, Our other staples include: full-fat single-herd cow milk yoghurt (3.9% milk fat) using six bacteria species (including a proprionic species, which converts lactic acid into proprionic acid for a wonderful "Swiss cheese" mild flavour, and the bonus health benefit of proprionic acid); full-fat single-herd Guernsey yoghurt (4.1% milk fat); full-fat single-herd water buffalo milk yoghurt (don't know the milk fat %); twice-drained Greek Style goat and cow milk yoghurt, a single-herd Jersey kefir (3.9% milk fat), We also get a 19% milk fat "sour cream" from the same Jersey herd (cream + culture and nothing else) and, the non-plus-ultra--creme fraiche (heavy cream + culture and nothing else). Our favourite cheesemaker also makes an amazing cultured butter from that same creme fraiche, getting over 92% milk fat content, and she only uses milk from the cows when they are grazing on fresh green pasture, which makes the butter a natural deep yellow. Alas, no creme fraiche or butter yet this year, as the late, late spring has meant no pasture grazing until this past week or so.

    Becky, some of these fermented dairy products are only available in local markets, so perhaps you could scout out some markets in your area and you may get lucky..

  15. Jürgen
    It makes me shake my head even more to see that this is a product of germany. When you check the number (DE 033 BW) on this site
    http://www.wer-zu-wem.de/handelsmarken/milchnummer.html
    you'll see its made by Campina in Heilbronn. Quite a big company here and I don't like it. But I'm nevertheless surprised about those extra stuff even in the plain yoghurt, because I'm pretty sure you can get even Campina Yoghurt here in Germany that is really just plain. Seems like this product is just tailored for the american taste buds...
    And apart from that: Why the hell does one have to eat yoghurt that was shipped around half the globe?? No cows down there in Miami?
  16. What a load of crap! How can they not know how bad all that sugar is for you?
    In my way of thinking,they just don't care,as long as they get their money.
    maybe you should try and go with a smaller cruse liner that will do the entire menu your way.
  17. Sunny
    Personally I think plain yogurt tastes delicious and don't quite get why someone would ruin the taste by adding crap to it. I love that sour almost buttermilky taste.
  18. I avoid low-fat foods as well, because they are filled with so much other stuff that is not helpful.
  19. Dana
    I feel so blessed. We have a grass-fed dairy in our area. No, it's not raw (in Ohio, you must purchase a herdshare to get raw milk), but it's low-temp pasteurized. In the past six months or so they began selling yogurt. Not only is their plain yogurt full-fat, they add cream to it. Brilliant.

    Unfortunately their flavored yogurts are low-fat, though their reputation is such that I think if I read the label I wouldn't see any franken-ingredients in it. As it is, their heavy cream is nothing but cream, which is pretty amazing in America. Most heavy cream I've seen offered for sale has gums added to it at the very least. Kroger's heavy cream even has skim milk added and no, they don't label it half-and-half, that's something else again.

  20. Tom
    Dana,
    Where is this mystical dairy in Ohio? Any search term I can use to find it? I live in Ohio and want better-for-me milk :)
  21. Myfanwy
    Wow. This thread is making me feel better and worse all at the same time... I thought that food in the UK was bad... and in terms of low fat, processed, sugar added, guar-gummed-to-the-max rubbish a lot of it really is pretty awful. But the more I hear about US food availability the better my supermarket shelves look in comparison, even if we're "catching up" fast.

    I can't get raw milk in the supermarket, but any health food shop here would supply it and we can order it online... and there'd be a riot if the supermarkets didn't stock some unpasturised cheese ("the one that tastes of cheese" as my five year old has it!)

    GUM in CREAM??? I despair.

    Perhaps we should all move to France,.

  22. FrankG
    There was a BBC series from Jimmy Doherty (a pig farmer come TV celebrity) called "Jimmy's Food Factory" in which he tried to replicate supermarket foods. In one episode he made both regular and low-fat mayonnaise...

    "regular" was quick and simple: eggs, oil. salt, mustard (if memory serves)

    while the "low-fat" version not only took longer but had about 5 times as many ingredients, including the same slime-mold which grows on lettuce if you let it rot!

  23. Janice
    @Murray (comment #14) I live in Toronto and have never seen those yoghurt products. Where do you buy them? Astro yoghurt (plain) 6% fat is becoming very scarce.
    By the way, Dr. Eenfeldt, you are doing wonderful work.
  24. Sophie
    The place where I found full fat yogurt most easily accessible is Spain: a great country for LCHF! Tuna is sold for nothing in olive oil, meat is fatty, and octopus is fresh and tender... yum!

    In other countries, you can try to find DEvonshiire cream: it's about 60% fat and tastes like whipped cream!

    I think I am going to start making my own yogurt...

  25. Galina L.
    Just add a heavy organic cream to any plain yogurt, and it will stop being low-fat. It is not a problem unless you need to buy it prepackaged for some reason.
  26. Blegh. I can't find anything BUT low-fat yogurt around here. 2% is the highest fat I've found, and that is still loaded with sugar. I really wonder how long it will take our country to wake up and stop selling this crap!
  27. Paul
    Well, that would explain it. here's me thinking they had the boat to themselves!
  28. Guyjeb
    US resident here:

    You're right. Everything is full of sugar when it comes to yogurt.

    I was baffled when I found out Trader Joes has Full fat Yogurt. Hard to find, but yes they have it.

    Mix with heavy cream and blueberries. Perfect.

  29. Belina Dover
    I look at the NV before I buy something that ''claims'' to be low fat. Sometimes you CAN actually buy a low fat product that is not full of carbs, and I am anti HFLC diet because it's just wrong. You should watch everything that you eat and aim for a balanced diet.
  30. Haavard
    Personally, I gave up yogurt when I made the transition to LCHF.

    I really don't miss it at all. In fact, I have no desire to add it back in whatsoever. I see people here talking about 6-8% fat ranges. These are not high fat products -period- and should thus be avoided, just like fruits.

  31. Zoe
    Sorry I'm late to comment, but this seems highly relevant: https://youtu.be/M0eWawTdt_w

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