A Calorie Is Not a Calorie – Not Even Close

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A calorie is not a calorie. Some calories may, for example, make you burn 300 more calories per day (corresponding to 30 minutes of running).

The figure above shows that a strict low-carbohydrate diet on average resulted in burning 300 calories more, compared to a diet much higher in carbohydrates. More details about the study here.

Recommended reading, especially for those who still believe Coca Cola’s favorite argument: There’s no bad food, only bad character.

The truth is that an exaggerated intake of sugary drinks may force you to run an extra 30 minutes a day to maintain your weight. If you don’t get hungrier from all the sugar and eat more (which many do), in which case you could need an extra hour of running – per day – to maintain your weight.

Exercise is great, but for maintaining weight it’s easier to avoid sugar and junk food. Continue Reading →

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Big Fat Presentations Coming?

ASBP

Here’s tiny me (6’7”) giving a presenation at the ASBP Obesity Conference in Philadelphia two weeks ago. This is the talk on insulin and weight control, I also did one on the spectacular popularity of the LCHF diet in Sweden.

All the presentations during the conference were taped and will be sold as a DVD set by ASBP when they are ready.

However, with some luck I’ll probably be able to show the videos of my two presentations online. Possibly even for free. I’ll let you know when the deal is ready.

Continue Reading →

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No Longer a Sad Hiding Person

Before and after

Before and after

I received an e-mail with husband and wife success stories: Continue Reading →

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The Problem Is the Soda. Not the Calories.

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The latest issue of the science journal Diabetes Care has two articles about sugar. Soda consumption in the US has increased fivefold in the last 50 years, to 200 liters (211 quarts) per person and year.

  • In the first article, this gigantic source of sugar gets the blame for a big part of today’s obesity and disease epidemic.
  • In the second article, soda is said to be just empty calories, without any harmful effects of its own.

What’s the difference between the articles?

One difference is that the second article is written by a person who is paid by Coca Cola. The author John L. Sievenpiper ….

…has received several unrestricted travel grants to present research at meetings from The Coca-Cola Company and is a co-investigator on an unrestricted research grant from The Coca-Cola Company.

The focus on calories is the junk food industry’s favorite argument. They desperately want to make you believe that obesity is caused by bad character, not bad food.

With this explanation, those who sell (addictive) sugar drinks are automatically innocent.

Coca Cola and other companies pay billions for advertisements to make you believe the calorie explanation. And they are happy to pay researchers who can spread the same idea in scientific settings, to make their advertisement more credible.

Continue Reading →

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No More Doc

It’s time to say goodbye to Doc. When I started discussing the low-carb diet on the internet in 2005-2006 I called myself “Doc”. The moniker has stayed with me, even after I “came out” with a Q & A column under my own name on another Swedish low-carb forum in February of 2007, and then on my Swedish blog in December 2007.

Now the time has come to end the tradition of using “Doc” as my signature in the comments. It is passed its sell-by date and may be confusing for new readers. From now on I plan to answer only as Andreas Eenfeldt.

If you too are thinking about changing your own name when you comment – for example for an increased transparency and credibility  - I’m all for it.

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“Everything Changed for Me Once I Did a Lifestyle Change”

Before and after

Before and after

I just got another e-mail from Mexico with an impressive success story! Continue Reading →

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Restoring Liver Function with LCHF?

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I received an e-mail from Eduarda Castro, whose husband was diagnosed with Gilbert’s syndrome when he was a teenager.

This is a relatively common and benign hereditary cause of sporadic jaundice (yellowing of the skin due to elevated bilirubin levels) caused by the liver not being able to get rid of bilirubin at the normal pace.

Here’s her story on how her husband normalized his liver function: Continue Reading →

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Why You Should NOT Listen to Your Dietitian

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Here’s another good reason NOT to listen to your dietitian if you get diagnosed with diabetes*. A reader sent me her story:

Continue Reading →

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Saturated Fat Completely Safe According to New Big Review of all Science!

Good fat, good fat, good fat.

Good fat, good fat, good fat.

Are butter, and other saturated fats, bad for us? No.

Yet another new major review of all good science shows that saturated fat is as harmless as other natural fats, whether unsaturated or polyunsaturated.

This review goes through all observational studies and randomized intervention studies of high quality that have been done. Which means all the best science available on the subject:

The result? People who eat a lot of butter or other saturated fats don’t get sicker. And people who reduce their butter intake don’t get any better. There simply is no connection between butter and heart disease.

The same result – that butter is completely harmless – has recently been shown in major reviews of all science time after time, again and again and again and again.

When are older so-called experts going to give up their outdated and unscientific warnings about butter? It’s time to embrace science.

Today, fear of butter lacks scientific support. It’s based on old preconceptions and on an inability to update knowledge.

If you want to be taken seriously as a “nutrition expert” you’d better keep updated. It’s not good enough to continue spreading ideas from the 80′s about fat, ideas that have long since been refuted.

There has to be a limit to how long you can bury your head in the sand. Or what do you think?

Continue Reading →

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Happy Ketones

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Here’s low-carb blogger Jimmy Moore at the recent obesity conference. He’s smiling about soon hitting two consecutive years in deep ketosis (and 80 pounds or so lost).

The gadget he’s holding up is a new breath analyzer for acetone (i.e one of the two main ketone bodies). Yellow light means plenty of acetone.

The gadget is $99 and is good for any number of measurements. It seems to work pretty well. Better than urine strips but not quite as good as the gold standard: blood measurements.

You can read more about the Ketonix breath analyzer and order it here.

Continue Reading →

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