23 Packets of Sugar in One SMALL Soda??

Here’s an entertaining video, in which Coca-Cola’s European president is hard pressed by a British journalist. Even though he’s media-trained he gets thrown way off track.

The Coca-Cola president is desperately trying to move away from the comparison with tobacco. You will always need to eat and drink, while you don’t have to smoke, he says. True. But as the beginning of the video makes clear, there’s also no need for a single gram of added sugar from Coca Cola either! It’s completely lacking in nutritional value and only contributes excess energy in the midst of an obesity epidemic.

In short: Each Coca Cola you drink makes you fatter.

In the introduction of the segment the impressive and eloquent Dr. Aseem Malholtra is interviewed. He attended the LCHF conference in South Africa in February.

What do you think about the Coca-Cola clip above? Is the journalist being unnecessarily harsh and hard on the president, or is he getting what he deserves? Is he trying to wriggle out of his responsibility for the obesity and disease that his company is spreading?

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Evening Snacks For Kids at Diet Doctor’s

Friday-800x383

Are there any good alternatives to evening snacks – without a lot of sugar and junk food – that are appreciated by young kids?

If you ask Klara, 3 years old, this it the perfect alternative (water to go with it). This is what she wants from the grocery store. Perhaps because she never got used to anything sweeter.

What do you serve as an evening snack?

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Hard Times for the Tobacco Industry: Ireland Mandates Plain Packaging for Cigarettes

Feeling tempted?

Fancy a smoke?

Recently Australia became the first country. Now Ireland too is implementing a law that is the tobacco industry’s nightmare, cigarette packs with big health warnings and where the brand name may only be displayed in a small, standardized text.

The Irish Times: Plain packaging for cigarettes signed into law in Ireland

A great idea that, despite the tobacco industry’s strong opposition and disinformation campaigns, seems to reduce smoking in Australia faster than ever before.

Now Ireland is following their lead. England seems to be on its way. Who’s next?

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I Quit

gripen

After nine years in my current position I quit. It has been a good and instructive and valuable time, but it no longer works. It’s not efficient enough.

I just resigned – despite the fact that I like my job, my colleagues and my work place. There’s something more important to do that requires and deserves total focus. I’m not talking about quitting the blog or the Diet Doctor venture, but my job as a family physician. Continue Reading →

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Why Do Meat Eaters Get Colon Cancer More Often?

Not the best for your colon?

Not the best for your colon?

This post may be controversial – like swearing in the church of low-carb.

Is it unsafe to eat meat? Despite the scare propaganda the answer seems to be no. Meat is a nutritious and great food that humans have always eaten.

Warnings in the media are usually based on extremely uncertain studies – statistics from food questionnaires, where people who eat more meat also smoke more, eat more junk food, exercise less and so forth. Even with this unfair comparison the differences between meat eaters and non-meat eaters are usually small – and sometimes they point in the opposite direction.

In Asia, for example a review of all studies has shown that Asian meat eaters are healthier than non-meat eaters. Asians with a vegetarian orientation seem to get more heart disease and more cancer.

In summary, meat seems to be generally healthy, nutritious and great food. But there’s one exception.

The Exception

The exception, the area that deserves to be taken quite seriously – is the risk of colorectal cancer. For some reason studies repeatedly show that people who eat red – mainly processed – meat specifically get more colon cancer.

The increase in risk for colorectal cancer in people who eat a lot of meat is generally low, around 20%. This can be compared with a massive 1,000% increase of risk for lung cancer for smokers. But even if the increase in risk is small, it’s been shown so often and so consistently that it probably is real.

Two days ago another study was published showing a slightly smaller risk for colorectal cancer in vegetarians. Why does red (processed) meat seem to slightly increase the risk of colorectal cancer? Continue Reading →

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The Best Way to Exercise for Beginners

running

Do you want to get started exercising although it’s all new to you? Here’s just the guide you need.

Our guest expert Jonas Bergqvist — physical therapist, health inspiration and writer — recently shared his philosophy on exercise and exercise advice. Now it’s time to really get cracking.

This post will stick to the basics: How can you get started with exercise in the best way if you’re inexperienced, or even a complete beginner? Can it be done?

Without further ado, here’s Jonas:

Guest Post

Jonas
This first post on exercise is about how to start exercising if you’re inexperienced or out of practice. The ten main take-home messages are summarized in point form at the end.

Start with your attitude towards exercise. Exercising for the right reasons is absolutely the deciding factor for long term success. Continue Reading →

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No Need for Braces Before Agriculture

teeth

Typical lower jaw from a hunter-gatherer, and aborigins from early 1900’s.

Before we invented agriculture our ancestors mostly had perfectly aligned teeth, without dental crowding or the need for braces. These tooth and jaw problems – which are now extremely common – are rarely or never seen in skeletons from our hunter-gatherer ancestors.

This is yet again showed in a new review of a few hundred European skeletons from the period 26,000 to 4,000 B.C.:

Malocclusion and dental crowding arose 12,000 years ago with earliest farmers

Similar findings have been seen many times before and are of great interest to everyone who has children with growing faces. How do you make them get as well-formed and well-functioning teeth and jaws as possible? Something in our modern environment messes things up – but what?

After discussing this with some experts in the field (for example at the Ancestral Health Symposiums), I’ve three things that seem important for well-formed jaws and teeth. Three things that we’re trying to follow with our children. Continue Reading →

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