LCHF for Beginners

Do you want to eat real food (as much as you like) and improve your health and weight? It may sound too good to be true, but LCHF (Low Carb, High Fat) is a method that has been used for 150 years. Now, modern science backs it up with proof that it works.

There is no weighing your food, no counting, no bizarre “meal replacements,” no pills. There is just real food and common sense. And all the advice here is 100 percent free.

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Dietary advice  (in 26 languages)
  3. Theory
  4. Tips and recipes
  5. Cookbooks and more
  6. Frequently asked questions

Introduction

A LCHF diet means you eat less carbohydrates and a higher proportion of fat. Most importantly you minimize your intake of sugar and starches. You can eat other delicious foods until you are satisfied – and still lose weight.

A number of recent high-quality scientific studies shows that LCHF makes it easier both to lose weight and to control your blood sugar. And that’s just the beginning.

The basics

  • Eat: Meat, fish, eggs, vegetables growing above ground and natural fats (like butter).
  • Avoid: Sugar and starchy foods (like bread, pasta, rice and potatoes).

Eat when you’re hungry until you are satisfied. It’s that simple. You do not need to count calories or weigh your food. And just forget about industrially produced low fat products.

Real food. Add some good fat (like butter).

There are solid scientific reasons why LCHF works. When you avoid sugar and starches your blood sugar stabilizes and the levels of insulin, the fat storing hormone, drops. This increases your fat burning and makes you feel more satiated.

Note for diabetics

  • Avoiding the carbohydrates that raise your blood sugar decreases your need for medication to lower it. Taking the same pre-low-carb diet dose of insulin might result in hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). You need to test your blood sugar frequently when starting this diet and adapt (lower) your medication. This should ideally be done with the assistance of a knowledgeable physician. If you’re healthy or a diabetic treated either by diet alone or just with Metformin there is no risk of hypoglycemia.

Dietary Advice

Eat all you like

  • Meat: Any type, including beef, pork, game meat, chicken, etc. Feel free to eat the fat on the meat as well as the skin on the chicken. If possible try to choose organic or grass fed meat.
  • Fish and Shellfish: All kinds: Fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel or herring are great. Avoid breading.
  • Eggs: All kinds: Boiled, fried, omelettes, etc. Preferably choose organic eggs.
  • Natural Fat, High-Fat Sauces: Using butter and cream when you cook can make your food taste better and make you feel more satiated. Try a Béarnaise or Hollandaise sauce, check the ingredients or make it yourself. Coconut oil and olive oil are also good options.
  • Vegetables that Grow Above Ground: All kinds of cabbage, such as cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage and Brussels sprouts. Asparagus, zucchini, eggplant, olives, spinach, mushrooms, cucumber, lettuce, avocado, onions, peppers, tomatoes etc.
  • Dairy products: Always select full-fat options like real butter, cream (40% fat), sour cream, Greek/Turkish yogurt and high-fat cheeses. Be careful with regular milk and skim milk as they contain a lot of milk sugar. Avoid flavored, sugary and low-fat products.
  • Nuts: Good to eat instead of candy in front of the television (preferably in moderation).
  • Berries: Okay in moderation, if you are not a super strict or sensitive. Good with whipped cream.

Basic tip for beginners: Maximum 5 grams of carbohydrate (excluding fiber) per 100 grams of food

Avoid if you can

  • Sugar: The worst. Soft drinks, candy, juice, sports drinks, chocolate, cakes, buns, pastries, ice cream, breakfast cereals. Preferably avoid sweeteners as well.
  • Starch: Bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, French fries, potato chips, porridge, muesli and so on. “Wholegrain products” are just less bad. Moderate amounts of root vegetables may be OK (unless you’re eating extremely low carb).
  • Margarine: Industrially imitated butter with unnaturally high content of omega-6 fat. Has no health benefits, tastes bad. Statistically linked to asthma, allergies and other inflammatory diseases.
  • Beer: Liquid bread. Full of rapidly absorbed carbs, unfortunately.
  • Fruit: Very sweet, lots of sugar. Eat once in a while. Treat fruit as a natural form of candy.

Once in a while

You decide when the time is right. Your weight loss may slow down a bit.

  • Alcohol: Dry wine (regular red or dry white wine), whisky, brandy, vodka and cocktails without sugar.
  • Dark chocolate: Above 70 % cocoa, preferably just a bit.

Drink most days

  • Water
  • Coffee: Try it with full-fat cream
  • Tea

More healthy tips

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Advice on LCHF in other languages

Do you have another translation or a significant improvement of one of the earlier ones? E-mail me (more info).

The Theory Behind LCHF

What are you designed to eat?

Humans evolved over millions of years as hunter-gatherers, without eating large amounts of carbohydrates. We ate the food available to us in nature by hunting, fishing and gathering all the edible foods we could find. These foods did not include pure starch in the form of bread, pasta, rice or potatoes. We have only eaten these starchy foods for 5 – 10 000 years, since the development of agriculture. Just a limited adaptation of our genes takes place in such a relatively short time.

With the Industrial Revolution, 100 – 200 years ago, we got factories that could manufacture large amounts of pure sugar and white flour. Rapidly digested pure carbohydrates. We’ve hardly had time to genetically adapt to these processed foods.

In the 80s, the fear of fat gripped the western world. Low-fat products popped up everywhere. But if you eat less fat you need to eat more carbohydrates to feel satiated. And it’s at this time in history that our disastrous epidemics of obesity and diabetes started. The most fat-phobic country in the world, the USA, was hit the hardest and is now the world’s most obese country.

Today, it’s clear that the fear of real food with natural fat contents has been a big mistake.

The problem with sugar and starch

All digestible carbohydrates are broken down into simple sugars in the intestines. The sugar is then absorbed into the blood, raising the blood glucose levels. This increases the production of the hormone insulin, our fat storing hormone.

Insulin is produced in the pancreas (pictured to the right). In large amounts insulin prevents fat burning and stores surplus nutrients in the fat cells. After some time (a few hours or less) this may result in a shortage of nutrients in the blood, creating feelings of hunger and cravings for something sweet. Usually at that point people eat again. This starts the process again: A vicious cycle leading to weight gain.

On the other hand, a low intake of carbs gives you a lower, more stable blood glucose, and lower amounts of insulin. This increases the release of fat from your fat stores and increases the fat burning. This usually leads to fat loss, especially around the belly in abdominally obese individuals.

Weight loss without hunger

A LCHF diet makes it easier for the body to use its fat reserves, as their release is no longer blocked by high insulin levels. This may be one reason why eating fat gives a longer feeling of satiety than carbohydrates. It’s been shown in a number of studies: When people eat all they want on a low carb diet caloric intake typically drops

So, no counting or food weighing is necessary. You can forget about the calories and trust your feelings of hunger and satiety. Most people don’t need to count or weigh their food any more than they need to count their breathing. If you don´t believe it, just try for a couple of weeks and see for yourself.

Health as a bonus

No animals in nature need the assistance of nutritional expertise or calorie charts to eat. And still, as long as they eat the food they are designed to eat they stay at a normal weight and they avoid caries, diabetes and heart disease. Why would humans be an exception? Why would you be an exception?

In scientific studies not only is the weight improved on a low carb diet – the blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol profile (HDL, triglycerides) are also improved. A calm stomach and less cravings for sweet food are also common experiences.

Initial side effects

If you stop eating sugar and starch cold turkey (recommended) you may experience some side effects as your body adjusts. For most people these side effects tend to be mild and last a just few days. There are also ways to minimize them.

Common during the first week:

  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Heart palpitations
  • Irritability

The side effects rapidly subside as your body adapts and your fat burning increases. They can be minimized by drinking some extra fluids and by temporarily increasing your salt intake a bit. A good option is to drink some broth every few hours. Alternatively, drink a few extra glasses of water and put extra salt on your food.

The reason for this is that carbohydrate-rich foods may increase the water retention in your body. When you stop eating high-carb foods you’ll lose excess water through your kidneys. This can result in dehydration and lack of salt during the first week, before the body has adapted.

Some people prefer to decrease their intake of carbohydrates slowly, over a few weeks, to minimize the side effects. But the “Nike way” (Just Do It) is probably the best choice for most people. Removing most sugar and starch often results in several pounds lost on the scale within a few days. It may be mostly fluids but it’s great for the motivation.

How low to go?

The less carbohydrate you eat the more pronounced the effect on your weight and blood sugar will be. I recommend following the dietary advice as strict as you can. When you’re happy with your weight and health you may gradually try eating more liberally (if you want to).

The Food Revolution

This presentation I gave at the Ancestral Health Symposium 2011 summarizes the history and science behind the ongoing LCHF revolution.

More theory and practice

Here four of the world’s biggest experts on the subject explain the theory and practice of carb restriction:

 

Tips and recipes

Breakfast suggestions

  • Eggs and bacon
  • Omelet
  • Leftovers from last night’s dinner
  • Coffee with cream
  • A can of mackerel and boiled eggs
  • Boiled egg with mayonnaise or butter
  • Avocado, salmon and crème fraiche
  • Sandwich on Oopsie-bread
  • A piece of very thin hard bread with lots of butter, cheese, ham, etc.
  • Cheese with butter on it
  • Boiled eggs mashed with butter, chopped chives, salt and pepper
  • A piece of brie cheese and some ham or salami
  • High-fat yoghurt with nuts and seeds (and maybe berries)

Lunch and dinner

  • Meat, fish or chicken dishes with vegetables and a rich full-fat sauce. There are many alternatives to potatoes, such as mashed cauliflower.
  • Stews, soups or casseroles with low-carb ingredients.
  • You can  use most recipes in cookbooks if you avoid the carbohydrate-rich ingredients. It’s often a good idea to add fat (e.g. butter, cream) to the recipe.
  • Drink water with your meal or (occasionally) a glass of wine.

Snacks

When you eat a low-carbohydrate diet with more fat and a bit more protein you will probably not need to eat as often. Don’t be surprised if you no longer need to snack. Many people do well on two or three meals per day. If you need a snack:

  • Rolled-up cheese or ham with a vegetable (some people even spread butter on cheese)
  • Olives
  • Nuts
  • A piece of cheese
  • A boiled egg from the refrigerator
  • Canned mackerel in tomato sauce

Olives and nuts can replace potato chips in front of the TV. If you always get hungry between meals you’re probably not eating enough fat. Don’t fear fat. Eat more fat until you feel satisfied.

Dining out or meals with friends

  • Restaurants: Usually not a big problem. You can ask to have potatoes/fries switched for a salad. With meat dishes, ask for extra butter.
  • Fast food: Kebab can be a decent option (preferably avoid the bread). In hamburger chains the hamburgers are usually the least bad option. Avoid soft drinks and fries, obviously. Drink water. Pizza toppings are usually OK, and the stricter you are the less of the pizza crust you will eat.
  • If you eat strictly everyday it’s less of a problem to make a few exceptions when you are invited out. If you’re not sure what will be served you can eat something at home before you leave.
  • Nuts or cheese is good “emergency food” when there are no other adequate options to be found.

Shopping list for beginners

Print this list and bring it to the store:

  • Butter
  • Heavy cream (40% fat)
  • Sour cream (34% fat)
  • Eggs
  • Bacon
  • Meat (minced, steaks, stew pieces, fillets, etc.)
  • Fish (preferably fatty fish like salmon or mackerel)
  • Cheese (preferably high-fat)
  • Turkish yoghurt (10% fat)
  • Cabbage (cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, etc.)
  • Other vegetables that grow above ground
  • Frozen vegetables (broccoli, wok vegetables, etc.)
  • Avocados
  • Olives
  • Olive oil
  • Nuts

Clean out your pantry

Want to maximize your chances of success? Especially if you have difficulty with cravings / sugar addiction, it is smart to throw out (or give away) sugary and starchy foods, “light” products, etc. These include:

  • Candy
  • Potato chips
  • Soft drinks and juices
  • Margarine
  • Sugar in all forms
  • Bread
  • Pasta
  • Rice
  • Potatoes
  • Breakfast cereals
  • Everything that says “low fat” or “no fat”
  • Ice cream
  • Cookies

Why not do it now?

The Serpent in Paradise

Be very skeptical of special “low-carb” products such as pasta or chocolate. Unfortunately these products usually stink. They have prevented the weight loss for loads of people. They’re usually full of carbs once you see through their creative marketing.

For example, Dreamfields’ “low carb pasta” is almost pure starch that’s absorbed more or less like any pasta:

How about low carb bread? Be careful: if it’s baked with grains it’s certainly not low carb. But some companies still try to sell it to you as a low-carb option. Here’s an example:

Low-carb chocolate is usually full of sugar alcohols, which the manufacturer does not count as carbs. But roughly half of these carbs may be absorbed, raising the blood sugar and insulin. The rest of the carbs ends up in the large intestine, potentially causing gas and diarrhea. Furthermore any sweeteners can maintain sugar cravings.

If you want to be healthy and slim, eat real food instead.

RECIPES

Easy ways to cook eggs

  1. Place the eggs in cold water and boil 4 minutes for soft-boiled or 8 minutes for hard-boiled. Eat them with mayo if you like.
  2. Fry eggs in butter on one or both sides. Add salt and pepper.
  3. Melt some butter in the frying pan and add 2 eggs and 2-3 tablespoons of cream per serving. Add salt and pepper. Stir until done. Add some chives and grated cheese on top. Serve with fried bacon.
  4. Make an omelet batter with 3 eggs and 3 tablespoons of cream. Add salt and spices. Melt butter in the frying pan and pour in the batter. When the omelet solidifies on top you can fill it with something tasty. For example one or several kinds of cheese, fried bacon, fried mushrooms, good sausage (read the ingredients) or left-overs from last night’s dinner. Fold the omelet in half and serve with a crispy salad.

Instead of bread

Will you have a hard time living without bread? Ooopsies are a good option. It’s a “bread” without carbs and can be eaten in a variety of ways.

Oopsies
6–8 depending on size.

3 eggs
100 grams (3.5 ounces) of cream cheese
a pinch of salt
½ tablespoon fiberhusk / psyllium seed husks (can be excluded)
½ teaspoon baking powder (can be excluded)

  • Separate the eggs, with the egg whites in one bowl and the egg yolks in another.
  • Whip the egg whites together with the salt until very stiff. You should be able to turn the bowl over without the egg whites moving.
  • Mix the egg yolks and the cream cheese well. If you choose, add the psyllium seed husk and baking powder (this makes the Oopsie more bread-like).
  • Gently fold the egg whites into the egg yolk mix – try to keep the air in the egg whites.
  • Put 6 large or 8 smaller oopsies on a baking tray.
  • Bake in the middle of the oven at 150° C (300° F) for about 25 minutes – until they turn golden.
  • You can eat Oopsies as bread or use them as a bun for a hotdog or hamburger. You can also put different kinds of seeds on them before baking them, for instance poppy, sesame or sunflower seeds. One big Oopsie can be used for a swiss roll: Add a generous layer of whipped cream and some berries. Enjoy.

Less strict: some bread
Can’t live without real bread? Then have a thin piece of bread and add lots of butter and toppings. The more butter and toppings the less bread you need to feel satisfied.

Instead of potatoes, rice, pasta

  • Mashed cauliflower: Divide the cauliflower into smaller pieces and boil them with a pinch of salt until soft. Remove the water. Add cream and butter and mash.
  • Salads made from above-ground vegetables, perhaps with some kind of cheese. Try out different kinds.
  • Boiled broccoli, cauliflower or Brussels sprouts.
  • Vegetables au gratin: Fry squash, aubergine and fennel (or other vegetables you like) in butter. Add salt and pepper. Put in baking dish and add grated cheese. Heat at 225° C (450° F) until the cheese melts and turns golden.
  • Vegetables stewed in cream, e.g. cabbage or spinach.
  • Cauliflower rice: Grate cauliflower, boil for a minute or two. Great substitute for rice.
  • Avocado

Snacks and dessert

  • Mixed nuts
  • Sausage: Cut it in pieces, add a piece of cheese and stick a toothpick through them.
  • Vegetables with dip, Try cucumber sticks, red, yellow or green peppers, cauliflower, etc.
  • Cream cheese rolls: Roll some cream cheese in a piece of salami, air-dried ham or a long slice of cucumber.
  • Olives
  • LCHF chips: On a baking tray, form small piles of grated Parmesan cheese. Heat in oven at 225° C (450° F). Let them melt and get a nice color (be careful – they burn easily). Serve as chips, perhaps with some dip.

Cookbooks

There are a million cookbooks with low-carb recipes. Just avoid books that are unnecessarily scared of fat. Remember: If you avoid carbs you have to eat more fat or you’ll be hungry. Don’t fear fat. Fat is your friend. Add fat until you feel satisfied.

Here is a good example:

Good luck with your new LCHF life!

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Further reading

Do you have more questions about LCHF? See my page with common questions and answers.

Do you want to lose weight as effectively as possible? See How to Lose Weight.

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3,512 Comments

  1. Zepp
    New Zeeland.. it some sort of skim milk!

    "Trim milk could be making you fat"

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&obje...

  2. Zepp
    Thats normal.. its glucose shortige.

    And the food you eat dont have that much waist that make bovel movments.

    Keep it up and force your body to use fat as predominant fuel.

    Take some home cures for bovel movment and smoth stool.

    No one can say what you shall eat for breakfast.. I prefer bacon and egg.. if I eat breakfast at all.

  3. Prabhat
    Hello Doc,

    This is my second week on LCHF. Initial issues like feeling dizziness and low on energy are now settling down and I am feeling better energy wise.

    I am mainly eating green leafy veggies, mushrooms, eggs, chicken (twice/thrice in a week) and dairy products like yoghurt, milk, cheese and butter with salad.

    Along with these, I am also consuming raw coconut and tender coconut water and Avocados.

    I am already feeling like I have lost some weight but yet to hop on the weighing machine to make any comment.

    I am 34 years, male, weighing 83 kgs (pre lchf) and 5ft 11 inches in height.

    I have completely stopped eating rice (steamed home cooked), legumes/lentiles, bread (roti in India) and kind of sugar.

    However, I am constantly worrying that eating this much fat might cause my arteries blocked since I was recently diagnosed with borderline cholesterol (223).

    Triglyceride was also on the higher side (180 approx).

    All the people around are suggesting that this is not correct since they are not aware of such things(lchf) yet.

    Please suggest if I am doing all correct and hope by following this diet it doesn't cause any problem to my health.

    Thanks in Advance.

    Reply: #3506
  4. Mary
    It all makes a lot of sense. But what about vegetarians? I'm overweight, I crave carbohydrates and have a big problem controlling portions. I know from the few times when I had meat that I feel full much longer. But I felt guilty every time I had meat. I'm not preaching or judging but deep down I don't feel I should kill just to improve my health. And I've just been diagnosed borderline diabetic, have a history of diabetes in my family (my mother and both her parents) and I'm very afraid of the future.

    All my vegetarian friends are normal weight, vegetarians are supposed to be healthier, I eat almost no junk food (not even of the "natural" variety) mostly what I eat is considered very healthy food (a lot of it, admittedly). I'm confused and don't know what to do. Any help, especially if from someone with a similar background, or a direction to further resources, would be very useful. Thank you.

    Reply: #3507
  5. Jeroen
    Hi Doc,

    I am a big guy (very heavily built so to speak)199 cm/134 kg and I lost 8 kg the first couple of weeks but the weight loss is now at a standstill at 126 kg. My goal is 110 kg and I am doing lchf now for allmost three months, should I start counting calories, grams of fat or something or shoud I just be patient?

    Reply: #3508
  6. Zepp
    Im not Doc!

    But its difficult for us European/Americans to understand India food.. but try to eat as healty food as you can!

    Real whole food.. like eggs and fish, poultry, beef and a lot of veggies.. preferely low starch veggies.

    You can use butter/Ghee/coconut oil for cooking and olive oil to your veggies.

    http://www.dietdoctor.com/lchf-success-greetings-india

    First of all you need to eat whole healty and nutrient dens food.. then you can lower your carbs and ad some more fat.

    Often one eat fatty food.. and then one dont need to ad more then for cooking!

  7. Zepp
    But you got a diabetc heredety.. thats the differens, it means that you can eat that much carbs as your friends!

    "Slow glucose removal rate and hyperinsulinemia precede the development of type II diabetes in the offspring of diabetic parents."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2240915

    I would say that you eat to much becuse you getting bigger, not the oposite!

    Go directly to a low carb diet!

    You gonna get a lot of transitation problems.. like cravings and other.. but get there and stay there its going to be better!

    And one can be vegetarian on LCHF too;

    http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/vegetarian/a/Low-Carb-Vegetarian-Die...

  8. Zepp
    First you lose water.. then it comes a stand still.. becuse you still need to upregulate your capability to be a fat burner!

    It takes 2-3 weeks for your brain to adapt to take more ketones.. and then it take months for your muscles to convert to use fat as predominal fuel!

    I say that you can be patient for three months at least.. just focus on eating real whole and healty food.. and learning about your bodys signaling about apetite.

    If it take some energy frome stored fat, your apetite often get lower.. or one eat fewer times a day.

  9. Desiree
    I have been on a low carb diet for 3 1/2 weeks, the first week I lost 7 lbs, the 2nd 4 lbs and at the end of week 3 nothing. I did have a huge cheat day on Saturday, I ate Pasta, I know I know , I got discouraged when the scale didn't move at the end of week 3. Sunday I got back with it...I have been drinking crystal light maybe once a day and using splenda in my tea every morning, could the artificial sugar be hindering my weight loss? I have also been feeling nauseous after every single meal the last 2 weeks. I notice the nausea more when I have artificial sugar, but I have it even without....Any advice?? Id like to stick with it as my father has lost 40 lbs in the last 2 1/2 Months on LCHF, and I have quite a bit of weight to lose myself
    Reply: #3510
  10. Zepp
    You just past the first transitation stage.. its frome now it happens.. if it happens!

    The first weightloss was much water.. some of it comes back.. one often get tirsty as hell and drink a lot!

    The nausea is probably a sign that says.. its too much fat.. either its to much or your body have to adapt to manage that much.

    One beginners wrong thinking is that the more fat the better.. thats not so.. if one eat fatty food one dont need to ad that much, only for cooking and to make sauces!

    And second.. this diet is mostly energy dens food, one can eat on side plates!

    If one need to fill the plate for the look at it.. ad a lot of green leafy veggies!

  11. Mary
    Thank you Zepp. I'm desperate enough that I'm seriously considering when and how to start this, giving up all the food I like (bread, pasta in all forms) for food that I dislike and have avoided all my life.

    But I do have to do something, I have a BMI of 40 and I've been offered the surgery option by my doctor and that scares me even more than avoiding carbs. Every time I eat with friends I measure my portions by theirs and I stop eating when they stop, but I finish meals hungry. Many times it almost feels like I'm hungrier after I eat. And if I eat anything with sugar like ice cream or dark chocolate I can see the looks of pity that I can't control myself, as if I had that every day for breakfast.

    I've been researching and LCHF makes sense for me. My "healthy" diet has brought me here, maybe the opposite of what I've been doing will take me in a better direction.

    The main thing holding me back at the moment is my husband. If I suggest this to him he's going to love it, that's all he wants to hear: a scientific reason to avoid brown rice and eat meat and gravy? he'll be in heaven. But he has sky high cholesterol as it is, even taking medication, do I have the right to risk making him eat this much fat?

    Reply: #3517
  12. Pam
    Hi,

    For me its been now three weeks on LCHF. I lost 5 pounds in the initial week but now my scale is stuck. Have I already reached a plateau?

    There are normal days and then there are days when I feel extremely low on energy all day and continue to sleep. I also feel as if my body is releasing lot of heat. Do others on LCHF also experience this.

    I am on a vegetarian diet and usually eat fresh vegetables, cottage cheese, cheese, yoghurt and butter milk. I sometimes eat a piece of dark chocolate more than 70% coco or a slice of fruit with cream. Can I drink milk or soya milk without sugar?

    Reply: #3513
  13. erdoke
    Pam,
    We know nothing about your physical condition, so it is impossible to provide proper recommendations. I'm not even sure that you are seriously overweight...
    Regarding milk, I would only recommend fresh raw milk from pastured cow. Pasturized milk lacks some of the most important enzymes, vitamins and other nutrients. Then it is better to go for fermented milk in the form of full fat yoghurt, sour cream, cheese, etc.
  14. Sonnett ZA
    Is kefir milk permitted for use?
    Reply: #3515
  15. erdoke
    Live culture kefir is OK, but keep in mind that it is not high in fat, but contains similar amounts of protein. It is not recommended in case of yeast sensitivity.
  16. Pam
    Erdoke

    I am 35 years, 150 cms tall and weigh 65 kgs now. I am not clinically obese but I am over weight. I suffer from poly cystic ovaries and my weight has been increasing constantly ever since. Though most of my health indicators I fine, but I suffer from fibromyalgia, full body pain, and lethargy. My ideal weight would be around 45 but I target 50 kgs. so another 15 kgs to go.

    Reply: #3518
  17. Zepp
    First of all.. vegetarians are not healtyer and dont live longer then meat eaters, thats a fact!

    Moste vegetarians eat veggie junk food.. like meat eaters eat meat/carb junk food!

    For healt one have to eat a healty diet.. rich in nutrients and on top of that enough of energy!

    It means that one have to coock ones food by one self.. frome the best groseries one can buy and have aford to.

    Im not a vegetarian.. but its easyer to get all nutrients from a mixed diet.. I eat a lot of veggies to my meat/fish/poultry/dairys!

    If you eat eggs/fish and dairys to your veggies then you dont need to consider what other nutrients you need.

    And on the topic of cholesterole.. theres a big sales program out there for Statins.. that says that one have to have a low cholesterole.. thats not scientific.. its sales promotion!

    The moste comon reason for high cholesterole is metabolic syndrom/prediabetes!

    Its only a few percetage of the population that got a genetic dysfunction that make them getting high cholesterole from fat intake!

    Heres a guy that explain moste about cholesterole and the major sciens and why one get it and how to get a better regulation.. if thats was the problem at first!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuj6nxCDBZ0

    And I think that your houshold is like moste other western houshould.. you are the chef.. and your husband eat what you put on his plate?

    Then.. meat and gravy isnt that bad.. but you can serv a lot of veggies to that.. and if he is a loving husband he eat what you serving.. otherwise the chef would be disabointed!

    Then find out what veggies he like.. how he like them prepared!

  18. erdoke
    Indeed, 50 kg seems to be a realistic target and this way there is some extra to lose.
    Feeling hot and limboing between normal and low energy suggests badly affected thyroid function. Try to include more low GI carbs in your diet. If you can figure what foods you crave (excluding simple carbs of course) that might help as well. If liver is not an option, try to supplement with cod liver oil, but not huge amounts.
  19. Pam
    Thanks Erdoke.

    I think you may be right, as apart from weight gain, I have other symptoms like low tolerance to cold, fibromyalgia, my pulse is usually 62 - 66 per minute, lethargy, chronic fatigue, feeling of slowing down etc. But my T3 T4 and TSH are normal. I wonder if its type 2 Hypothyroidism.

    What all I can include in low GI carbs? Will that mean that I dont need to do LCHF?

    Reply: #3520
  20. erdoke
    LCHF might mean different levels of carb and fat to different people. On top of that the idea that women used to be more gatherers than hunters still appeals to me. Of course the primary goal here is not to find a final diet solution, rather to identify a way of reversing an altered physical condition. This reversing process can be as different for individuals as the final "healthy diet".
    I would experiment with low GI, non-grain foods added to the existing diet. I know it is not easy when you are vegetarian.
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