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Another Dreadful Low-Fat Product

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Now I’m back in Sweden again, with good access to the internet, after three weeks of travelling in America. Thus there’ll be more regular updates again.

Here’s a quick example of how bad low-fat products can be for your health. It’s nothing new, but even worse than what I’ve seen back home.

Here’s yogurt served at breakfast on the cruise last week. Notice that all of them except the plain one have the words “low fat” on the top. It sounds healthy – but it’s not. Have a look:

Yoghurt

The low-fat yogurt contains almost no fat. Instead it’s filled with sugar and modified starch, rapidly absorbed bad carbs. And not a little: 22 grams per 113 gram serving.

About 70 percent of the energy in the yogurt is pure sugar. And it’s very noticable: it tastes like eating candy for breakfast.

The reality is that the manufacturers have removed 2 grams of fat from the container of yogurt. Then they’ve added about 15 grams of sugar, seven times more, and they sell it implying that it’s healthy for you.

Is anyone surprised that there are three times more obese Americans today, compared to when the fear of fat took hold back in the 1980’s?

Earlier about failed low-fat diets

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How American Dietitians Sold Out to Coca Cola and Pepsi

AND and Coca Cola

Sponsored by junk food

Do you trust what dietitians say in the media? Perhaps you shouldn’t. At least in the US the dietitian could have been educated by The Coca Cola Company.

I recommend reading this new report on the “unspeakably cozy relationship” between America’s largest association of nutrition professionals (AND) and Big Food. In short: AND have totally sold out to Coca Cola, Pepsico as well as candy manufacturers (like Mars foods). In return for money and influence Big Food is allowed to, for example, produce educational material and accredited education for the dietitians of America.

So when your dietitian says that it’s all about eating a balanced diet (including soda and candy) and exercising more, that could be arguments taught to him or her by Pepsico.

More

Weighty Matters: Author Michele Simon’s Devastating Report on the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ Corporate Ties

Food Politics: New study: Big Food’s ties to Registered Dietitians

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The Weight of the Nation: More In(s)anity

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"Go ahead, eat your candy and cake"

I just saw the second episode of HBO’s “Weight of the Nation”. Oh, boy. Did they really have to burn money on producing a glitzy show with the exact same failed message that everybody has already heard X number of times before?

You know, the exact same advice that has failed us through the entire obesity epidemic. The same advice that repeatedly (at least 17 times so far) turns out to be the least effective when actually subjected to scientific tests. In a word, crap advice.

You guessed it: it’s all about desperately trying to ignore your hunger, counting your calories and eating “balanced diets”. And a balanced diet is as usual defined seemingly without a shred of science involved. A balanced diet is basically what the “experts” believe that you should eat.

This is the worst part: Any junk food can in theory be “part of a healthy balanced diet”. In fact, you shouldn’t even attempt to quit the junk food. You’re actually warned from even trying! Check it out: Continue Reading →

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