Archive | Health problems

“Our Diabetes Clinic Wouldn’t Listen, But Reported Me to the Authorities”

A 9-year old is firmly advised to eat half a pound of root vegetables per meal for the brain to work

9-year-old is firmly advised to eat a pound of root vegetables per meal for the brain to work

Diabetics are routinely exposed to neglect, because of old ingrained dogmas on how they need to eat. Diabetics are getting sicker unnecessarily, and often often their attempts to improve their health are met by opposition from health-care professionals.

The following example is one of the worst I’ve encountered. A mother managed to help her 9-year-old son with type 1 diabetes to become healthier and feel better by eating fewer  carbohydrates. The result of the mother helping her child? The diabetes clinic reported her to the authorities!

However, the report was soon abandoned – because everyone involved, including school health professionals, noticed that the child was doing much better than before – but the diabetes clinic continues to put up resistance.

Recently, the diabetes clinic sent a letter to the school, stating that the child needs to eat at least a pound of root vegetables per meal in order to “ensure that enough glucose reaches the brain”. The fact that the child was already feeling better than ever before doesn’t seem to matter. Here’s the full translation of the letter, signed by a dietitian at the clinic:

“The recommended intake of carbohydrates at lunch is no less than 30 g (1 oz).

In order to ensure that enough glucose reaches brain cells and other body tissues, a minimum of 30 g of carbohydrates is required at lunch.

If carbohydrate intake has to be in the form of root vegetables, then 300–700 g (about a pound) is required to get the carbohydrate intake up to 30 g (1 oz).”

This is a story from Sweden in the year 2014. A story that an appropriate investigative TV show should dig in to: Continue Reading →

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“Overall, I Now Have a Completely New Life”

P-O Heidling

P-O Heidling

P-O Heidling from Linköping, Sweden, has had type 1 diabetes since childhood. Despite being a “very good” patient, his blood sugar levels increased with the years. He was tired constantly and many more health problems started to sneak up on him.

He emailed me about what happened when he – despite resistance from health care professionals – started eating LCHF about five years ago.

Here’s his story: Continue Reading →

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Dramatically Improved Heart Health in Sweden!

Heartattacks

Swedes are becoming heart-healthier, faster!

The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare recently released the latest statistics for the risk of myocardial infarctions in Sweden, up to the year 2013. This is encouraging reading for almost everyone… except for those who are desperately looking for signs that increased butter-consumption has something to do with heart disease.

The years when LCHF has been popular and butter sales in Sweden have more than doubled – from 2008 – are highlighted in green in the image. The risk of heart disease is not on its way up, as some have warned, but rather the risk is going down faster than ever!

Swedes are consuming a lot more butter and at the same time getting more heart healthy than ever before.

How will the outdated fat-fearing people at our agency for dietary guidelines explain away this? They’ll probably continue their usual tactics: acting as though nothing has happened. Or what do you think? Continue Reading →

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LCHF on Australia’s Biggest Science Show!

Catalyst

Things are happening! The other day an excellent TV show aired about the benefits of LCHF-like food. This on Australia’s biggest science show, Catalyst.

The show is not only about how LCHF may reduce appetite, produce weight loss without hunger or improve diabetes. It also goes into how this kind of food may help some top athletes to better performance.

Watch the episode for free online:

Catalyst: Low-carb diet: fat or fiction? (30 minutes long)

The show features professor Tim Noakes and professor Steve Phinney. Continue Reading →

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