Archive | Health problems

Discovering Airline Diabetic Meal

Airline diabetic meal

Airline diabetic meal

Airline food is hardly great, and it’s hardly healthy. How about the special “diabetic meal”, would that be an improvement?

A reader decided to try it out: Continue Reading →

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Losing Nearly 50 lbs Since November With LCHF

Before and after

Before and after

What a change in only a few months! Fatima just e-mailed me her story:

I want to thank you for a great website. I’ve been doing LCHF since early November 2013 and will always stick to this diet, as this way both me and my stomach feel our best! I’ve lost almost 50 lbs (22 kg), and still have pounds to lose!

I wanted to share the before and after picture – only 5 months between the two pictures!

Again, thank you, and you may share the picture on your website!

Sincerely,

Fatima

Continue Reading →

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The Picture That Changed Everything

Before and after

Before and after

Annelie Löfgren told her story on our Swedish Facebook page:

When I saw the picture to the left I decided that this had gone too far. This was in July 2012.

I’m so happy that I found LCHF. I’m so happy that I gave myself the chance to feel good!

Now I’m 88 lbs (40 kg) lighter since the summer of 2012. I’ve managed to squeeze in a pregnancy and son number three in between too! (A beloved little Theodor, whom in all likelihood wouldn’t exist, had I not found LCHF.)

Now I have the chance to live with them for a longer time! I also have the chance to stay longer in my profession as a hair dresser. Not finished yet, but soon! :)

Congratulations, Annelie! Continue Reading →

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Tabloid: “Eating Meat Is Like Smoking Cigarettes”

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Swedish tabloid Aftonbladet wins the prize for sensationalism for its headline after yesterday’s confused questionnaire study on meat: “Steak is as dangerous as smoking”.

A bit later in the article comes the most bizarre: the increase in risk only applies to people between 55 and 65. After 65 the cigarettes, I’m sorry – the steak, suddenly becomes a health food. Confused? Don’t be – read yesterday’s post for the details: Is It Dangerous to Eat Meat Before Age 65?

Funnily enough, the article includes comments from Dr. Dahlqvist and me on whether LCHF is dangerous or not. We address the two obvious issues:

  • LCHF is about – exactly what the acronym stands for – less carbohydrates and more fat, not necessarily more meat. You could even adopt a vegetarian LCHF diet, if you want.
  • Yesterday’s study is only based on questionnaires and imaginative statistics, no evidence.

When the researcher behind the questionnaire study, Valter Longo, hears my comment he gets “annoyed”: Continue Reading →

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Is It Dangerous to Eat Meat Before Age 65?

Meat the American way. Not in the picture: the drink.

Meat the American way. Not in the picture: the drink.

Is it dangerous to eat meat if you’re between 55 and 65? Will eating lots of meat then suddenly become healthful after you turn 65?

This is the somewhat confusing conclusion that some researchers drew from a new American questionnaire study:

As usual, we have to take sensational headlines with a substantial pinch of salt. This was just a food questionnaire that was sent to some thousand Americans, and the researchers then looked at statistical associations with diseases.

Uncertain Association

As regular readers know, one can’t prove causation by correlating statistics from questionnaire studies. Only ignorant or sensationalism-driven journalists believe so. Unfortunately these two groups seem to constitute the vast majority of all journalists.

On subsequent examination, it turns out that at least 80% of similar findings in uncertain questionnaires are incorrect – see table 4 in the excellent review Why Most Published Research Findings are False.

So a more scientifically correct headline would be “There is a 20 percent chance that meat quadruples the risk of cancer for people under the age of 65 and reduces the risk for older people.” Not as enticing.

The statistical correlation between meat-eating and disease in people under 65 in the U.S. may just as well be due to the fact that meat consumption there is associated with eating junk food, smoking, lack of exercise, less vegetables and in principal any unhealthful lifestyle you can think of.

What, in all of these unhealthful lifestyles, is the cause of disease ? Statistics cannot prove this.

IGF-1 and cancer

Therefore, there are good reasons to ignore the study. But I guess that there’s still some truth behind it. Scientists report that protein (high-quality animal protein in particular) may raise levels of the hormone IGF-1, which stimulates cell division. High levels of IGF-1 may in the long run increase the risk of cancer.

What they don’t mention is that carbohydrates also increase levels of IGF-1, at least as much. Particularly bad carbohydrates in greater quantities radically raise IGF-1 levels. The only thing you can eat that doesn’t significantly increase levels of IGF-1 is fat.

The logical conclusion is that any variation of a low-carbohydrate diet with moderate amounts of protein (and enough fat) is the healthiest in the long run – at least to keep IGF-1 low while still feeling great. How much protein? The amount you need to feel good, feel full and stay strong and healthy. What is this concept called? LCHF.

The really ambitious may add intermittent fasting for maximum effect. Continue Reading →

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Can Giving Up Grains Cause Cancer?

Colin Campbell

Colin Campbell

Could giving up grains cause heart disease and cancer? This is what Colin Campbell claims in his new book The Low-Carb Fraud:

MailOnline: Are low-carb diets BAD for you? Nutrition expert claims giving up grains can lead to heart disease and cancer

Biochemist T Colin Campbell is the author behind the well-known vegan book The China Study and according to him, we should eat a low-fat vegan diet to keep us healthy.

There is a lack of evidence to support Campbell’s ideas. The book The China Study rests on an observational study – uncertain statistics – that doesn’t prove anything. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that the statistical data in the book were cherry-picked to fit the author’s preconceptions. Statistics that pointed strongly in the other direction were not included.

A new review of all relevant similar studies shows that Asians who eat more red meat on the contrary are healthier. They suffer less heart disease and less cancer. Not quite what Campbell managed to cherry pick from his one China study.

There may be good ethical reasons to be a vegan – it’s open for discussion. But those who fear animal foods for health reasons are afraid for no good reason. Continue Reading →

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ADHD or Too Much Sugar?

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Could unruly kids with ADHD-like problems be hypersensitive to sugar and wheat? Here’s yet another story about what can happen when parents try to exclude such foods:

OK, let’s try this. We’ll skip wheat and sugar. We started at the beginning of the school year. No wheat flour and no sugar (either at school or at home). Three days later we already noticed a significant difference and now, 4 weeks later, we’re not the only ones cheering…

The original story here: ADHD or Too Much Sugar? (Google translated from Swedish)

Many experts have previously dismissed the association between sugar and ADHD. Studies designed to give children small amounts of sugar (up to a pint – half a liter – of soda) have not shown any significant short-term effect. But the effect of long-term use of large amounts of bad carbohydrates is unknown. And there’s a high-quality study that demonstrated a significant improvement from avoiding, among other things, sugar and wheat flour.

There are scientists who believe that ADHD symptoms are similar to withdrawal symptoms from drugs and thus may present because the child is addicted to junk food/sugar. If you remove this food, the problem would soon diminish, which seems to be a common experience among parents and teachers.

Do you have any experience with ADHD and a diet change? Continue Reading →

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“You Have Literally Saved My Life”

Before and after

               Before and after

Here’s an impressive life transformation story, from Gareth Hicks: Continue Reading →

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A Low-Carb Diet Best for Fatty Liver

fatty-liver-pic-1

Study after study shows a more effective weight loss on a low-carb diet. And if you reduce abdominal fat, you’re also reducing the amount of liver fat. The disease fatty liver is strongly associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Not surprisingly, yet another study* shows that a low-carb diet is a good treatment for fatty liver. In only six days on a low-carb diet, the reduction in the amount of liver fat was about the same as it was for seven months (!) on a calorie-restricted diet. Furthermore, the volume of the liver decreased quickly, probably because of less glycogen and fluids (decreased swelling).

How do you most effectively decrease the amount of fat in your liver? In the same way that you melt fat off your abdomen. Less sugar and starch in your diet. Continue Reading →

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New Study: Is Today’s Wheat Bad for You?

dangerous_wheat

Today’s wheat is not the same wheat that your grandmother ate when she was young. Not even close.

Today’s wheat is greatly genetically modified to grow faster and provide a higher yield of wheat per acre. More food to the starving poor was a blessing, but could there be disadvantages with the modern super wheat?

Could it be bad for our health? Could it, for example, lead to severe digestive issues for many people?

Cardiologist William Davis argued this in his best selling book Wheat Belly. Davis got criticized for exaggerating the scientific support for his theories – which he did. But a lack of good evidence doesn’t mean that a theory must be incorrect.

A new high quality study, published in British Journal of Nutrition, tests one of Dr. Davis’ speculations, with dramatic results.  Continue Reading →

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