Archive | Health problems

Another Lunch at the Diabetes Meeting – and Another Test

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Perhaps a somewhat better lunch the day after the last one, which says a lot about how horrible the former lunch was.

I didn’t eat from the conference bag above, but instead I went to a restaurant where you could buy real food. The idea was to test my blood sugar and compare with the last test:

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Where’s All the Research on Lifestyle and Diet?

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Professor Nyström and Dr Tengblad

What’s wrong with the world’s largest meeting on diabetes research? Nobody talks officially about the real problem. A problem that has been demonstrated in two gigantic studies in recent years. Studies nobody has the courage to talk about.

The market for diabetes research and diabetes medications will only increase as long as the silence continues. More and more people will get sick unnecessarily.

At the meeting, I got the chance to talk quite a bit with Professor Fredrik Nyström and Dr Anders Tengblad. They both have, just like I do, a keen interest in the importance of lifestyle for diabetics.

Official discussions about this were almost entirely absent from the conference. Despite over 1300 presented scientific articles and discussions, there were not very many about eating significantly less of what diabetics don’t tolerate (carbohydrates). How many do you think? The correct answer is… zero!

It’s in the context of this that the junk-food lunches are not only ironic, but also a symbol of the total silence about the real problem. Continue Reading →

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The Result of My Diabetes Lunch

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What happened when I ate the junk-food lunch at the diabetes meeting?

Above, you can see the blood-sugar graph. My blood sugar predictably shot up from all the sugar and starch. It peaked at around 160 mg/dl (9 mmol/l). The red circles above represent actual measurements, the line represents an average of two consecutive  measurements.

A normal fasting blood sugar is between 70 mg/dl and 100 mg/dl (4 and 6 mmol/l). After a meal, blood glucose should stay below 160 mg/dl (8.7 mmol/l) to be considered normal.

Fortunately I don’t have diabetes, but still the blood sugar spikes to levels that usually only diabetics attain. The more often you do this, the worse it is. Or well, worse for the person who eats. But the better for those who sell diabetes medications and other diabetes-related things here at this conference.

With 15,000 participants here for an entire week, one might wonder how many will get type 2 diabetes from eating the junk that is served at the diabetes conference. Some of the participants will probably become part of the rapidly growing diabetes epidemic that feeds the entire diabetes industry.

There’s potential for an even bigger conference next year.

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Lunch at the Diabetes Conference

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Here’s the lunch bag we got at the diabetes meeting. And here are the contents: Continue Reading →

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LCHF Deadly in the Long Run… or Not?

Will cholesterol levels, and thereby heart health, suffer when you eat a high-fat low-carbohydrate diet? That’s what people used to believe – even I thought so once – but science proves that this is wrong.

Studies on diets similar to LCHF usually show that the participants on average not only lose weight but also improve their health markers, including cholesterol. This is also what a Swedish expert investigation concluded last year. And this study from the other week was no exception.

Even the harshest critics have had to concede. Now, they’re sometimes claiming that LCHF will probably cause very poor health markers some time in the future, some time long after the studies have been completed. After, for example, five years – or after you’re weight is stable – LCHF will turn around magically and have the opposite effect.

However, once again reality shows something different. Here are some excellent newly published numbers after five years, from Sweden’s perhaps most rigorous LCHF person, Tommy Runesson. He cut his weight in half in the first couple of years and has since then been practically weight stable for three years:

In mg/dl

Numbers in mg/dl

In mmol/l

Numbers in mmol/l

Cholesterol Numbers After Five Years on LCHF

Perhaps LCHF will magically instead have the opposite effect after six, seven years? Although this doesn’t appear to be the case:

My Health Markers After Eight Years on LCHF

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Time for a Gigantic Diabetes Meeting

Next week it’s time for the world’s largest scientific meeting about diabetes, EASD, in Vienna. Nearly 20,000 physicians, scientists, vendors and other participants will be there.

EASD.org

The major problem with diabetes treatment today is that diabetics are advised to eat the very thing that they can’t handle – large amounts of carbohydrates. This makes it necessary for diabetics to use a lot of potentially dangerous drugs, they gain weight and suffer long-term complications from uncontrolled blood sugar. The question is if this will even be mentioned on stage at the conference.

On short notice I decided to attend the conference myself on Monday. It could be exciting, or what do you think? Reports are coming up.

Diabetes – How to Normalize Your Blood Sugar Continue Reading →

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New Major Study: A Low-Carb Diet Yet Again Best for Both Weight and Health Markers!

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Is it harmful to eat a low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss? Or is it even HEALTHIER than the current low-fat dietary advice?

A major new study published today further fuels the debate and has already made major headlines. In the study 148 people were told to eat either a low-carb diet (under 40 g of carbs per day) or a low-fat diet, for one year.

The results are similar to those in previous studies. Once again, those on a low-carb diet lost significantly more weight, in this case three times more:

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Dashed line = the low-carb group

Those who ate a low-carbohydrate diet also lost more fat mass.

What will upset people the most is that the low-carb group also got better cholesterol levels than those in the low-fat group! As usual, they got more of the good HDL cholesterol, lower triglycerides and an improved cholesterol profile (total/HDL). As if this wasn’t enough, the fat eaters in the low-carb group received a significantly lower risk assessment for heart disease according to the 10-year Framingham risk score!

In addition, the low-carb group got significantly less inflammation in the body (measured as CRP).

Finally, conspiracy theorists don’t get any support that “the meat industry” is behind all studies showing that low-carb diets work best. This study was funded by American tax dollars (through the National Institutes of Health). None of the authors have any financial ties to the industry.

Even before this study the results were nearly unanimous that a low-carb diet provides a better weight and better health markers than today’s low-fat advice:

Swedish Expert Committee: A Low-Carb Diet Most Effective for Weight Loss

After today’s study the truth becomes even clearer. It becomes even harder (and more embarrassing) for people to stick their heads in the sand.

When are people with weight problems going to receive scientifically sound dietary advice from most health care professionals? Hopefully soon.

The Study

Annals of Internal Medicine: Effects of Low-Carbohydrate and Low-Fat Diets: A Randomized Trial

Big Headlines:

TIME: For Weight Loss, Low-Carb Diet Beats Low-Fat
New York Times: A Call for a Low-Carb Diet
Reuters: Low-carb diets may beat low-fat options for weight loss, heart health
Washington Post: Low carb diets more than low fat ones may help protect against heart disease
USNews: Low-Carb Beats Low-Fat for Weight Loss, Heart Health: Study Continue Reading →

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Acne (and IBS) Vanished with a Diet Change

Before and after

Before and after

Can severe acne be cured with a diet change? This is still controversial but there are many who have experienced this and there are studies that prove that it may work.

I received an email from Micke, and here’s his story, translated from Swedish: Continue Reading →

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“LCHF Saved Me!”

Before and now

Before and now

I received an email from Amanda, who is on a massive weight-loss journey with LCHF. Here’s her story: Continue Reading →

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More Salt Is OK According to New Study

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Do you know anyone who has bought in to the fear-mongering propaganda against salt? Now yet another big study indicates that the fear of salt is highly exaggerated.

When they examined the salt habits of over 100,000 people, it turned out that people who salted more than the recommended amount had the lowest risk of cardiovascular disease. Those who salted a lot less – according to official guidelines – had a higher (!) risk of disease.

NBCNews.com: Pour on the Salt? New Research Suggests More Is OK

JSW: Low-Salt Diets May Pose Health Risks, Study Finds

The study should be taken with a grain of salt (pun intended) as this is, as usual, only statistics. But like previous studies, it suggests it’s fine to put salt on your food at home without feeling guilty.

However, it may for many reasons, be wise to avoid ready-made foods and junk food (and bread) that have lots of added salt. This salt is to hide the boring taste of cheap, poor ingredients. Continue Reading →

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