Archive | Food

The Soda Industry Suffers Historic Loss in the US

US-HEALTH-NYC SODA BAN

The soda industry in the U.S. suffered a historical loss the other day. For the first time, a soda tax is imposed!

Berkeley, California, became the first city to vote, with great majority, in favor of introducing a tax that will make sodas noticeably more expensive:

Politico: Berkeley breaks through on soda tax

This could be viewed as an insignificant event – Berkeley is a city of just 80,000 people, so who cares? But symbolically it’s a big thing. Similar proposals have on some 20 occasions been voted down in different cities in the U.S., after huge economic countermeasures from the soda industry, in the form of advertising.

Just in little Berkeley, the soda industry spent around 2 million dollars on TV and other advertisements to oppose the proposal. That’s almost $26 per person: during the Swedish election campaign in 2014, all the Swedish political parties combined spent $4.70 per person on advertisements. Per person, the soda industry spent five times more in Berkeley than all of the Swedish parties combined in an election year.

They must have bought up every single advertisement spot available. And yet they lost.

Now, experts think more cities in the U.S. will follow Berkeley’s example. And Mexico has already introduced a soda tax.

Some people think that there should be no taxes on anything, not even tobacco. Personally I disagree, but what I think doesn’t matter. What matters is that if we’re ok with taxing tobacco for health reasons we should certainly tax soda too.

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Do You Want to Watch the Excellent Obesity Documentary FED UP?

This spring I wrote about this exciting documentary, FED UP. Just from watching the trailer it was clear that this would be something extra. A documentary about the obesity epidemic, of highest quality, that doesn’t just put the blame on a lack of calorie counting and willpower in sick people (something that’s just sickening).

The documentary screened in theaters in the US during the summer and received consistently excellent reviews. It hasn’t shown in Sweden, but a couple of days ago it was released on DVD and finally I had a chance to watch it.

The movie is excellent and goes further than other previous major productions. It completely dismisses the sugar industry’s favorite idea that obesity just depends on calories. Instead, the blame is clearly put on the real culprit: sugar and addictive junk food.

Here’s the movie’s strengths… and its fatal weakness: Continue Reading →

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Across the Pacific Ocean Without Sugar or Other Junk Carbohydrates

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I’ve received many emails about this: A Finnish couple is rowing across the Pacific Ocean in protest against sugar and other bad carbohydrates. Their “Fat Chance Row” goes from California to Hawaii, which they’re hoping to reach in August.

You won’t find any pasta-loading on this row – they are eating real food, such as “dried meat, nuts, coconut butter and dried fruit, things that will keep at high temperatures”.

USA Today: Couple test food and each other on row to Hawaii

The expedition’s webpage: Fatchancerow.org

The words “Fat Chance” are from the title of professor Robert Lustig’s book about the dangers of sugar. The expedition is done in collaboration with his recently-launched organization Institute for Responsible Nutrition.

This is where the couple is now:

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What Happens If You Boil Coke?

What happens if you boil Coke?

Obviously, the sugar will be left on the bottom of the pot. But do you have any idea of how disgusting it looks? This charming Russian shows you. In just a few days his video has had more than 4 million views on YouTube.

Who wants a Coke after watching this video? Continue Reading →

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The Food Industry’s Own Studies Reveal the Risks with Sugar

A small, but tempting image

A small, but tempting image

Do you deserve to treat yourself to bad health today?

A new review of high-quality scientific studies shows yet again that sugar isn’t only bad for weight. Sugar is NOT just empty calories.

Sugar also has pronounced negative effects on health markers, such as blood pressure and blood lipids.

The New Zealand Herald: Sugar directly linked to heart disease – report

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Sugar: Hiding in Plain Sight

Here’s a four-minute video on sugar, movie script by Prof. Robert Lustig. In just a few weeks it’s had almost 200,000 views.

The video is short and simple – and mostly for beginners. But it’s worth four minutes.

I object to the over-simplification that fructose is a problem while glucose is the body’s best fuel. Glucose – in too large amounts and easily digestible forms – may also be a problem. And the video disregards the fact that fat is an excellent fuel with many advantages.

Fat and glucose – coming from real unprocessed food – are both good fuels for the body. Fat is a great basic fuel, that goes a long way. Glucose is a rocket fuel for peak performances. Continue Reading →

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The Problem Is the Soda. Not the Calories.

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The latest issue of the science journal Diabetes Care has two articles about sugar. Soda consumption in the US has increased fivefold in the last 50 years, to 200 liters (211 quarts) per person and year.

  • In the first article, this gigantic source of sugar gets the blame for a big part of today’s obesity and disease epidemic.
  • In the second article, soda is said to be just empty calories, without any harmful effects of its own.

What’s the difference between the articles?

One difference is that the second article is written by a person who is paid by Coca Cola. The author John L. Sievenpiper ….

…has received several unrestricted travel grants to present research at meetings from The Coca-Cola Company and is a co-investigator on an unrestricted research grant from The Coca-Cola Company.

The focus on calories is the junk food industry’s favorite argument. They desperately want to make you believe that obesity is caused by bad character, not bad food.

With this explanation, those who sell (addictive) sugar drinks are automatically innocent.

Coca Cola and other companies pay billions for advertisements to make you believe the calorie explanation. And they are happy to pay researchers who can spread the same idea in scientific settings, to make their advertisement more credible.

Continue Reading →

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