Archive | Food
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Bacon Poetry 12
How Animals Eat Their Food 14
Trettio gram kolhydrater
Thirty Grams of Carbs in Two Ways 37
The Dreamfields Pasta Fraud 240
New Study: Is Today’s Wheat Bad for You? 53
Dogs and Cats Getting Fatter and Fatter 65
Sugar vs Fat on BBC: Which is Worse? 113
“Butter Better than Vegetable Oils” 36
A Sweet Reason to Avoid Android Phones 49
The Problem With Low-Carb Bread 54
A New Toy Measuring Blood Ketones 143
Dietitian: Low Carb Could Be the Best Diet 40
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The Dreamfields Pasta Fraud Finally Results in an 8 Million Dollar Fine!

Fined 8M

Let this be a warning to all companies shamelessly selling “low-carb” fake products.

Dreamfields, the biggest brand of “low-carb” pasta, has for a long time lived on a blatant lie. I tested their pasta several years ago and found that it raised my blood sugar dramatically, much like regular pasta. When scientists later examined the matter, they found no difference at all between the “low-carb” pasta and regular pasta from the grocery store!

The pasta was included as an example of low-carb frauds in my presentation ”The Food Revolution”, with over 400,000 views on YouTube.

American lawyers filed a class action lawsuit this summer against Dreamfields, and the settlement papers were filed on Monday. The company gave up even before the trial and confessed. Their fine will be $7.9 million. Most of the money is reserved for reimbursing customers. If you bought the fraud pasta between 2004 and 2014 you are entitled to get your money back.

Law360: Pasta Maker Forks Over $8M In Low-Carb Labeling Deal

You read the time frame right. Dreamfields has continued with this blatant fraud for TEN YEARS and the brand has been a best seller. The makers have destroyed health and weight effects from a low-carb diet for countless people.

Dreamfields will now change the labeling for their product to something less deceptive. But there are still thousands of low-carb frauds out there that are just as bad from other companies.  Continue Reading →

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“I Should Have Believed My Grandmother Instead of Listening to Authorities”

Before and after

Before and after

I received an email from Megan, 24, in Melbourne, Australia. She’s got a fantastic story about what happened when she stopped eating what people said was healthy:

Continue Reading →

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Is Salt Dangerous? Or Good for You?

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Is salt dangerous? Certain organizations – such as those issuing official dietary guidelines – have warned for a long time against salt and recommended a reduced intake. But as often when it comes to nutrition, the science is far from settled.

A recent review of all good studies in this area shows that the amount of salt that most people consume is associated with good health. Both an extremely high salt consumption and a low consumption seem to be worse.

The review can be added to several similar reviews in recent years, that question the dead-certain warnings against salt. Neither too much, nor too little, seems to be best.

You can actually get too little salt. This causes fatigue, dizziness and difficulty concentrating. You lose focus. And maybe you don’t just feel worse from salt deficiency, perhaps it’s also really bad for your health.

Avoid high doses of salt from junk food, cheap processed foods, soda and bread. Extreme amounts of salt are hardly good for you, and there are more reasons to avoid such foods. But if you eat real food, you can probably put as much salt on your food as you like.

If you have symptoms of salt deficiency, try taking half a teaspoon of salt, dissolved in water. If you quickly feel better, you were probably salt deficient. Continue Reading →

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Free of Sugar Addiction – Third Time’s the Charm!

Before and after

Before and after

It can be difficult to get rid of a sugar addiction. Just like quitting smoking, several attempts may be needed before you succeed.

Here’s Sara’s story: Continue Reading →

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The Problem Is the Soda. Not the Calories.

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The latest issue of the science journal Diabetes Care has two articles about sugar. Soda consumption in the US has increased fivefold in the last 50 years, to 200 liters (211 quarts) per person and year.

  • In the first article, this gigantic source of sugar gets the blame for a big part of today’s obesity and disease epidemic.
  • In the second article, soda is said to be just empty calories, without any harmful effects of its own.

What’s the difference between the articles?

One difference is that the second article is written by a person who is paid by Coca Cola. The author John L. Sievenpiper ….

…has received several unrestricted travel grants to present research at meetings from The Coca-Cola Company and is a co-investigator on an unrestricted research grant from The Coca-Cola Company.

The focus on calories is the junk food industry’s favorite argument. They desperately want to make you believe that obesity is caused by bad character, not bad food.

With this explanation, those who sell (addictive) sugar drinks are automatically innocent.

Coca Cola and other companies pay billions for advertisements to make you believe the calorie explanation. And they are happy to pay researchers who can spread the same idea in scientific settings, to make their advertisement more credible.

Continue Reading →

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Saturated Fat Completely Safe According to New Big Review of all Science!

Good fat, good fat, good fat.

Good fat, good fat, good fat.

Are butter, and other saturated fats, bad for us? No.

Yet another new major review of all good science shows that saturated fat is as harmless as other natural fats, whether unsaturated or polyunsaturated.

This review goes through all observational studies and randomized intervention studies of high quality that have been done. Which means all the best science available on the subject:

The result? People who eat a lot of butter or other saturated fats don’t get sicker. And people who reduce their butter intake don’t get any better. There simply is no connection between butter and heart disease.

The same result – that butter is completely harmless – has recently been shown in major reviews of all science time after time, again and again and again and again.

When are older so-called experts going to give up their outdated and unscientific warnings about butter? It’s time to embrace science.

Today, fear of butter lacks scientific support. It’s based on old preconceptions and on an inability to update knowledge.

If you want to be taken seriously as a “nutrition expert” you’d better keep updated. It’s not good enough to continue spreading ideas from the 80′s about fat, ideas that have long since been refuted.

There has to be a limit to how long you can bury your head in the sand. Or what do you think?

Continue Reading →

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What Not to Serve at an Obesity Conference

bread

What should you not serve at an obesity conference? A large basket of bread.

Here’s what the bread basket at our table looked like when lunch was finished. It looked about the same at the other tables. Too bad if that trailer load of bread was just thrown away afterwards…

Many tables

Continue Reading →

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Tabloid: “Eating Meat Is Like Smoking Cigarettes”

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Swedish tabloid Aftonbladet wins the prize for sensationalism for its headline after yesterday’s confused questionnaire study on meat: “Steak is as dangerous as smoking”.

A bit later in the article comes the most bizarre: the increase in risk only applies to people between 55 and 65. After 65 the cigarettes, I’m sorry – the steak, suddenly becomes a health food. Confused? Don’t be – read yesterday’s post for the details: Is It Dangerous to Eat Meat Before Age 65?

Funnily enough, the article includes comments from Dr. Dahlqvist and me on whether LCHF is dangerous or not. We address the two obvious issues:

  • LCHF is about – exactly what the acronym stands for – less carbohydrates and more fat, not necessarily more meat. You could even adopt a vegetarian LCHF diet, if you want.
  • Yesterday’s study is only based on questionnaires and imaginative statistics, no evidence.

When the researcher behind the questionnaire study, Valter Longo, hears my comment he gets “annoyed”: Continue Reading →

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WHO Recommends Cutting Sugar Intake in Half!

Upper limit for a week?

Upper limit of sugar consumption for a week?

Big news today, the war on sugar is heating up. The World Health Organization is planning new dietary guidelines, where the proposed recommendation is to cut sugar intake in half!

The old upper limit of 10 percent sugar intake of total energy intake per day will remain, but WHO says that a further lowering of the limit to 5 percent will provide more health benefits (for example in controlling weight gain and dental caries).

The new goal of 5 percent corresponds to an upper limit of about 25 gram (or six teaspoons) added sugar daily. This is less than the amount of sugar in a can of Coke (33 centiliter).

An average sugar consumption of 10 percent of total energy intake – like in Sweden where I live – means that about half the population consumes more than the previously recommended upper limit and more than twice as much as the new upper limit.

Most people on an LCHF diet will no doubt keep well below the new target by a large margin.

It remains to be seen whether the WHO new draft guidelines will survive a massive campaign from well-funded sugar-lobbyists. Let’s hope so!

Let’s also hope that governments issuing dietary guidelines will embrace new science and lower their recommendations. Continue Reading →

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Is It Dangerous to Eat Meat Before Age 65?

Meat the American way. Not in the picture: the drink.

Meat the American way. Not in the picture: the drink.

Is it dangerous to eat meat if you’re between 55 and 65? Will eating lots of meat then suddenly become healthful after you turn 65?

This is the somewhat confusing conclusion that some researchers drew from a new American questionnaire study:

As usual, we have to take sensational headlines with a substantial pinch of salt. This was just a food questionnaire that was sent to some thousand Americans, and the researchers then looked at statistical associations with diseases.

Uncertain Association

As regular readers know, one can’t prove causation by correlating statistics from questionnaire studies. Only ignorant or sensationalism-driven journalists believe so. Unfortunately these two groups seem to constitute the vast majority of all journalists.

On subsequent examination, it turns out that at least 80% of similar findings in uncertain questionnaires are incorrect – see table 4 in the excellent review Why Most Published Research Findings are False.

So a more scientifically correct headline would be “There is a 20 percent chance that meat quadruples the risk of cancer for people under the age of 65 and reduces the risk for older people.” Not as enticing.

The statistical correlation between meat-eating and disease in people under 65 in the U.S. may just as well be due to the fact that meat consumption there is associated with eating junk food, smoking, lack of exercise, less vegetables and in principal any unhealthful lifestyle you can think of.

What, in all of these unhealthful lifestyles, is the cause of disease ? Statistics cannot prove this.

IGF-1 and cancer

Therefore, there are good reasons to ignore the study. But I guess that there’s still some truth behind it. Scientists report that protein (high-quality animal protein in particular) may raise levels of the hormone IGF-1, which stimulates cell division. High levels of IGF-1 may in the long run increase the risk of cancer.

What they don’t mention is that carbohydrates also increase levels of IGF-1, at least as much. Particularly bad carbohydrates in greater quantities radically raise IGF-1 levels. The only thing you can eat that doesn’t significantly increase levels of IGF-1 is fat.

The logical conclusion is that any variation of a low-carbohydrate diet with moderate amounts of protein (and enough fat) is the healthiest in the long run – at least to keep IGF-1 low while still feeling great. How much protein? The amount you need to feel good, feel full and stay strong and healthy. What is this concept called? LCHF.

The really ambitious may add intermittent fasting for maximum effect. Continue Reading →

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