“I Got Energy That I Didn’t Know Existed and the Pounds Melted Off”

Before and after

Before and after

Anna Skoog had been addicted to sugar since childhood and with time the pounds piled up on her. She tried to get comfortable with her weight, but after being accepted to art school the excess weight started to feel like a big obstacle.

She decided to do something about her weight issues once and for all. She was skeptical about the LCHF diet (low-carb, high-fat) but having heard a lot about it she decided to try it for a month.

Here’s her story about what happened: Continue Reading →

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Q&A: What Kind of Fasting Should I Do?

Ask Dr. Jason Fung

Do you want to lose weight or improve your diabetes using intermittent fasting? Are you unsure what kind of fasting to try?

My simplified suggestion would be to try “16:8″ fasting first, but there are many options and different variants may suit different people best. So let’s see what a real expert suggests.

Dr. Jason Fung, the Canadian nephrologist, is a world-leading expert on intermittent fasting and LCHF, especially for treating people with type 2 diabetes.

Dr. Fung answers questions weekly on our membership site. The most interesting questions and answers so far are now available to everyone. Here’s a few selected questions and answers about what kind of fasting you may want to try.

Different Kinds of Fasting

Are there significant differences in benefits from 24-hour fasting vs. multi-day fasting vs. 16:8 fasting?

Dr. Jason Fung: The main difference, as you may suspect, is that shorter fasting periods are less effective and are usually done more frequently. So a 16:8 fast is often done daily, whereas a 24 hr fasting period is done 2-3 times per week. For more severe insulin resistance, I tend to prescribe longer fasting periods, whereas for maintenance I tend to prescribe shorter ones. Continue Reading →

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Sugary Drinks May Kill 184,000 Adults Per Year

Lethal habit?

Lethal habit?

Drinking sugary drinks – like soft drinks and juice – may kill as many as 184,000 adults per year. This according to a new study published in Circulation.

Dariush Mozaffarian, from Tufts University, Boston, and a senior author of the study, said the focus should be on cutting the drinks out of diets in order to save lives.

‘It should be a global priority to substantially reduce or eliminate sugar-sweetened beverages from the diet,’ he said.

‘Some population dietary changes, such as increasing fruits and vegetables, can be challenging due to agriculture, costs, storage, and other complexities. This is not complicated.

‘There are no health benefits from sugar-sweetened beverages, and the potential impact of reducing consumption is saving tens of thousands of deaths each year.’

The study only looks at statistics and makes an estimation of the effect. This can’t prove what causes what. So you can’t know for sure if 184,000 adults are killed every year. It could be significantly fewer… or it could be much worse.

But no matter the exact number I think Dr. Mozaffarian is right. Doing nothing while tens or hundreds of thousands of people are dying every year is not acceptable. This is the tobacco fight all over again.

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Lose Weight Using Intermittent Fasting

Do you want to lose weight? I’m currently updating my page with the most important tips on How to Lose Weight. The page is structured so that you can start at the top with tip #1 and then keep going as long as you like – perhaps you only need one or two of them.

Today it’s time for a new piece of advice at number 15. First a quick recap of all the earlier tips:

Choose a low-carb diet, eat when hungryeat real foodeat only when hungrymeasure your progress wiselybe patientwomen: avoid fruitmen: avoid beer, avoid artificial sweetenersreview any medicationsstress less and sleep moreeat less of dairy products and nutssupplement vitamins and minerals… and exercise smart.

So there are many things to consider before moving on to this thing, but don’t let that fool you. This is one of the most effective weapons available to lose weight. It’s perfect if you are stuck at a weight-loss plateau despite “doing everything right” – or to speed up your weight loss.

Use Intermittent Fasting

This super weapon is called intermittent fasting. It means exactly what it sounds like… not eating, during a specified time interval. Here’s how to do it: Continue Reading →

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LCHF Breakfast by Fanny #10 – Scrambled Eggs with Basil and Butter

Aggrora1600

Scrambled eggs for breakfast is a classic and here’s the tenth and final LCHF breakfast idea from Fanny Lindkvist (Instagram).

Scrambled Eggs with Butter, Basil and Seed Crispbread

Ingredients, 1 serving

scrambled

2 eggs
2 tablespoons coconut cream, coconut milk, yogurt or sour cream
Salt
Butter
(Cheese)

Instructions

Melt butter in a pan on low heat. Mix together eggs and liquid, salt and add to the pan. Stir with a spatula from the edge towards the center until the eggs are scrambled. I like it soft and creamy, not with a surface, which means stirring often on lower heat. You can remove the pan from the heat when you add the batter, this is usually enough.

You can also make the scrambled eggs in a water-bath, this will make it super creamy. I did this when my daughter was young in order to avoid frying.

I always have my scrambled eggs with about 1–1½ oz (30–50 g) butter, a lot of fresh herbs and ideally a few pieces of seed crisp bread.

Continue Reading →

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Final Team DietDoctor Caribbean Reflections

overview FLL

Last month we we spent a week on the fantastic low-carb cruise in the Caribbean.
We invited our moderators to write guest posts here at the blog. Here’s the last report, by Marina Yudanov, with our final reflections:

Guest Post by Marina Yudanov

Team DietDoctor Caribbean Reflections

I enjoyed myself immensely on my first low-carb cruise this year. I would recommend it to anyone at least slightly familiar with LCHF, who has experienced the positive effects or done some reading on the subject. The speakers covered a diverse range of low-carb, high-fat-related topics and the talks ranged from personal accounts of LCHF life to technical talks on the biochemistry of the body and how it responds to diet. Listening to the presentations and talking to people was a great way to validate the things I’ve read, tried and internalized as truths. It was also a great eye-opener for new things LCHF-related that I hadn’t come across of my own accord before.
Continue Reading →

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“Fat is Back”

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Fat is back. Quite a nice CNN headline:

CNN: Fat is back: New guidelines give vilified nutrient a reprieve

Forbes: Fat Makes A Comeback: Experts Say It’s Time To Stop Limiting Dietary Fats

This comes after an article by a couple of top researchers in a the highly respected scientific journal JAMA. They urge the relevant authorities to remove any restriction on how much dietary fat to eat. Any such restriction is said to be not only useless for improving health, but actually harmful to the public health.

“I think it is crucial for all government agencies to formally state that there is no upper limit on fat,” says one of these top researchers to CNN. Very true. He also says that saturated fat is neutral for heart health. It’s simply not something to worry about.

Here’s the final paragraph of the JAMA article:

The limit on total fat presents an obstacle to sensible change, promoting harmful low-fat foods, undermining attempts to limit intakes of refined starch and added sugar, and discouraging the restaurant and food industry from providing products higher in healthful fats. It is time for the US Department of Agriculture and Department of Health and Human Services to develop the proper signage, public health messages, and other educational efforts to help people understand that limiting total fat does not produce any meaningful health benefits and that increasing healthful fats, including more than 35% of calories, has documented health benefits. Based on the strengths of accumulated new scientific evidence and consistent with the new DGAC report, a restructuring of national nutritional policy is warranted to move away from total fat reduction and toward healthy food choices, including those higher in healthful fats.

Fat is back. Almost all sensible people are starting to understand this. Quite a few also understand that this includes natural old-fashioned saturated fat. Butter is also back.

Continue Reading →

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Statin Nation II – What Really Causes Heart Disease?

What really causes heart disease? Are healthy people being turned into profitable patients by the statin industry?

High cholesterol is hardly a main cause of heart disease. The benefits of cholesterol-lowering medications (statins) for heart-healthy individuals has been exaggerated dramatically, and the risks of side effects have been silenced. This has made these drugs the most profitable ever for the pharmaceutical industry.

Statin Nation II

The movie Statin Nation examined a lot of this when it was released a few years ago. Recently the sequel was released – Statin Nation II. Watch the trailer above and you can watch the entire movie on the membership pages (free trial here).

Watch Statin Nation II

About the Movie

Statin Nation II goes into more detail on all the paradoxes and contradictions in the cholesterol hypothesis. And how the people in the pharmaceutical industry are allowed to collect the evidence that is later used to create official guidelines on who’ll need their drugs.

As an added bonus people who are partly funded by the pharmaceutical industry are allowed to sit on the expert committees that decide on the guidelines (using the industry’s evidence). Not surprisingly a lot of people end up being told they need the drugs, even healthy people. Incredibly naive, really.

The problem? These are powerful drugs with significant risk of side effects. Taking them without needing to is not just a waste of money – it actually does more harm then good.

The movie also examines what the real cause of heart disease might be. Continue Reading →

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