“Overall, I Now Have a Completely New Life”

P-O Heidling

P-O Heidling

P-O Heidling from Linköping, Sweden, has had type 1 diabetes since childhood. Despite being a “very good” patient, his blood sugar levels increased with the years. He was tired constantly and many more health problems started to sneak up on him.

He emailed me about what happened when he – despite resistance from health care professionals – started eating LCHF about five years ago.

Here’s his story: Continue Reading →

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Where Are You On The Global Fat Scale?

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My results

The obesity epidemic is spreading all over the world. Below is a test, where you can compare your weight and BMI to those of people in other countries:

BBC News – Where are you on the global fat scale?

I was at the Malaysian level when it comes to BMI, however not when it comes to height. How did you score? Continue Reading →

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Dramatically Improved Heart Health in Sweden!

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Swedes are becoming heart-healthier, faster!

The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare recently released the latest statistics for the risk of myocardial infarctions in Sweden, up to the year 2013. This is encouraging reading for almost everyone… except for those who are desperately looking for signs that increased butter-consumption has something to do with heart disease.

The years when LCHF has been popular and butter sales in Sweden have more than doubled – from 2008 – are highlighted in green in the image. The risk of heart disease is not on its way up, as some have warned, but rather the risk is going down faster than ever!

Swedes are consuming a lot more butter and at the same time getting more heart healthy than ever before.

How will the outdated fat-fearing people at our agency for dietary guidelines explain away this? They’ll probably continue their usual tactics: acting as though nothing has happened. Or what do you think? Continue Reading →

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Scientists Against Sugar

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Do we really need scientists to tell us how harmful sugar is? Yes, unfortunately. And here they are:

Researchers highlight strong links between sugar and chronic disease:
UCSF Launches Sugar Science Initiative

“The average American consumes nearly three times the recommended amount of added sugar every day, which is taking a tremendous toll on our nation’s health,” said Laura Schmidt, PhD, a UCSF professor in the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy and the lead investigator on the project. “This is the definitive science that establishes the causative link between sugar and chronic disease across the population.” Continue Reading…

Continue Reading →

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LCHF on Australia’s Biggest Science Show!

Catalyst

Things are happening! The other day an excellent TV show aired about the benefits of LCHF-like food. This on Australia’s biggest science show, Catalyst.

The show is not only about how LCHF may reduce appetite, produce weight loss without hunger or improve diabetes. It also goes into how this kind of food may help some top athletes to better performance.

Watch the episode for free online:

Catalyst: Low-carb diet: fat or fiction? (30 minutes long)

The show features professor Tim Noakes and professor Steve Phinney. Continue Reading →

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“Sugar Is Harming Our Children”

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Swedish science journalist Dr. Ann Fernholm has been very active in the sugar debate lately:

The extremely sugary products, which the industry is marketing with happy characters should be banned; foods that we’d never even let our pets eat, should not be sold as food for our children.

Here’s her great opinion piece at SVT Opinion translated from Swedish: Continue Reading →

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Saturated Fat and Butter: From Enemy to Friend

astrup

Science is in full swing changing views on saturated fat. More and more people realize that the fear of real butter has been a mistake.

One of the most well-known nutritional Scandinavian scientists, Danish professor Arne Astrup, has completely changed his view on the issue. Now he’s written a new opinion piece in the latest issue of one of the world’s leading scientific journals on the subject, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. He writes that dairy products and saturated fat are beginning to be viewed as good and healthful foods.

His article concludes (my boldface type):

The totality of evidence does not support that dairy SFAs increase the risk of coronary artery disease or stroke or CVD mortality…

There is no evidence left to support the existing public health advice to limit consumption of dairy to prevent CVD and type 2 diabetes. Cheese and other dairy products are, in fact, nutrientdense foods that give many people pleasure in their daily meals.

AJCN: A changing view on SFAs and dairy: from enemy to friend

Arne Astrup – as well as many leading nutritional scientists – has gained support from the food industry. Including several dairy-product manufacturers. Unfortunately, this and his focusing mostly on dairy products makes the article seem to lose a bit of credibility.

However, it’s a sign of the times when a well-established scientist like Astrup has the guts to (and is allowed to) totally dismiss fat-phobia in one of the leading scientific journals of nutrition.

The old fear of fat is melting away, along with yesterday’s low-fat craze. Welcome back, butter. Continue Reading →

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The Soda Industry Suffers Historic Loss in the US

US-HEALTH-NYC SODA BAN

The soda industry in the U.S. suffered a historical loss the other day. For the first time, a soda tax is imposed!

Berkeley, California, became the first city to vote, with great majority, in favor of introducing a tax that will make sodas noticeably more expensive:

Politico: Berkeley breaks through on soda tax

This could be viewed as an insignificant event – Berkeley is a city of just 80,000 people, so who cares? But symbolically it’s a big thing. Similar proposals have on some 20 occasions been voted down in different cities in the U.S., after huge economic countermeasures from the soda industry, in the form of advertising.

Just in little Berkeley, the soda industry spent around 2 million dollars on TV and other advertisements to oppose the proposal. That’s almost $26 per person: during the Swedish election campaign in 2014, all the Swedish political parties combined spent $4.70 per person on advertisements. Per person, the soda industry spent five times more in Berkeley than all of the Swedish parties combined in an election year.

They must have bought up every single advertisement spot available. And yet they lost.

Now, experts think more cities in the U.S. will follow Berkeley’s example. And Mexico has already introduced a soda tax.

Some people think that there should be no taxes on anything, not even tobacco. Personally I disagree, but what I think doesn’t matter. What matters is that if we’re ok with taxing tobacco for health reasons we should certainly tax soda too.

Continue Reading →

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Improving Health and Weight After 40 Years of Struggling

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Before and after

Here’s another story about a several decade-long struggle with weight and health issues, took a turn for the better when Ron Webb changed his diet: Continue Reading →

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How the Editor-in-Chief Became Free from Epilepsy

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Can you recover and manage without antiepileptic drugs by changing your diet? Ask Christer Kustvik, editor-in-chief at Swedish newspaper Corren:

I hope you can stand some rampant joy, dear readers, because this column will be written in a state of euphoria.

The past week has been one of the absolute best in my life.

As I wrote on Facebook:

“Yiiiihaaaa! For the first time in 20 years, I am OFF ALL MEDICATIONS!! Two decades of epilepsy problems are suddenly under control thanks to changing my diet (fewer carbohydrates /sugar). Absolutely amazing, I feel like I’m flying!”

That’s how it is.

Fewer carbohydrates/sugar has given me a new life. A healthy life.

Suddenly I feel strong. Energetic. Light.

To get well when you’re sick is like a dream. A feeling difficult to understand for healthy people, I think.

Corren.se: Arenas Filled with Junk Food

Continue Reading →

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