Search results for "saturated fat"

“Fat is Back”

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Fat is back. Quite a nice CNN headline:

CNN: Fat is back: New guidelines give vilified nutrient a reprieve

Forbes: Fat Makes A Comeback: Experts Say It’s Time To Stop Limiting Dietary Fats

This comes after an article by a couple of top researchers in a the highly respected scientific journal JAMA. They urge the relevant authorities to remove any restriction on how much dietary fat to eat. Any such restriction is said to be not only useless for improving health, but actually harmful to the public health.

“I think it is crucial for all government agencies to formally state that there is no upper limit on fat,” says one of these top researchers to CNN. Very true. He also says that saturated fat is neutral for heart health. It’s simply not something to worry about.

Here’s the final paragraph of the JAMA article:

The limit on total fat presents an obstacle to sensible change, promoting harmful low-fat foods, undermining attempts to limit intakes of refined starch and added sugar, and discouraging the restaurant and food industry from providing products higher in healthful fats. It is time for the US Department of Agriculture and Department of Health and Human Services to develop the proper signage, public health messages, and other educational efforts to help people understand that limiting total fat does not produce any meaningful health benefits and that increasing healthful fats, including more than 35% of calories, has documented health benefits. Based on the strengths of accumulated new scientific evidence and consistent with the new DGAC report, a restructuring of national nutritional policy is warranted to move away from total fat reduction and toward healthy food choices, including those higher in healthful fats.

Fat is back. Almost all sensible people are starting to understand this. Quite a few also understand that this includes natural old-fashioned saturated fat. Butter is also back.

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Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Stop Worrying about Saturated Fat!

Butter

The paradigm shift in nutrition is really happening and it’s moving ever faster. Even the industry-sponsored main association of American dietitians (AND) is now saying that saturated fat is probably nothing to worry about!

Instead they recommend eating less carbohydrates, especially less sugar. Pretty big news.

Here’s a nice summary by Dr. Sarah Hallberg (of recent TEDx fame): Earth Shattering, Pigs Flying, Hell Freezing Nutrition News

I’ve added Dr. Hallberg’s blog to our page with updates from great health blogs.

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Let’s Stop Lying About Physical Activity and Obesity

There were many impressive people at the recent Cape Town conference, but to me two people stood out the most. One of them is the British cardiologist Aseem Malhotra. A man who is not the least bit afraid to eloquently tell the truth that most people keep silent about.

Not long ago he wrote in the impactful British Medical Journal that it’s time to bust the myth that saturated fat has anything to do with heart disease. This placed him on the front pages of papers all over the world, but now a lot of people realize that he was right.

Malhotra has not slowed down after this. He is often on TV, expecially in his home country of England and it’s not hard to understand why when you meet him.

The Interview

I managed to get an interview with Dr. Malhotra in South Africa and above you can see a short section. He explains that the common idea about physical activitity as a cure for obesity is something we need to forget – because it’s not true.

In the full 22 minute interview ha talks more about what we should focus on instead of calories, what food can lower risk of heart disease more than statin drugs… and how he lost weight eating 1,000 calories extra of a certain kind of food.

The full interview can be seen on the membership pages (free one month trial):

How to Make Your Food a Powerful Medicine, Not a Slow Poison – Interview with Dr. Malhotra

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“I Feel Great and Strong and Life is Good”

Before and after

Before and after

What a change!

Ingegerd Salomonsson has an experience that many others share: Her obesity was associated with pregnancies. When she was young she was lean, but during three pregnancies she gained a lot of weight. More than most. She ended up weighing 309 lbs (140 kg) and probably also had type 2 diabetes.

After trying to lose weight in many ways, as early as in the 80’s she was given the opportunity to undergo weight-loss surgery (gastric banding). She lost a lot of weight – but over the years it came back. A second weight-loss surgery (gastric bypass) produced weight loss again – but again the weight began to creep back up over the years.

What do you do when not even two weight-loss surgeries solve your weight problems?

Finally Ingegerd found what worked for her – without new surgeries or medications. A lifestyle change brought all her health markers up to perfect and her weight fell back to where it was when she was young. And even though this lifestyle change is controversial her doctor approves and thinks she should continue.

Here’s her story: Continue Reading →

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Why Do Meat Eaters Get Colon Cancer More Often?

Not the best for your colon?

Not the best for your colon?

This post may be controversial – like swearing in the church of low-carb.

Is it unsafe to eat meat? Despite the scare propaganda the answer seems to be no. Meat is a nutritious and great food that humans have always eaten.

Warnings in the media are usually based on extremely uncertain studies – statistics from food questionnaires, where people who eat more meat also smoke more, eat more junk food, exercise less and so forth. Even with this unfair comparison the differences between meat eaters and non-meat eaters are usually small – and sometimes they point in the opposite direction.

In Asia, for example a review of all studies has shown that Asian meat eaters are healthier than non-meat eaters. Asians with a vegetarian orientation seem to get more heart disease and more cancer.

In summary, meat seems to be generally healthy, nutritious and great food. But there’s one exception.

The Exception

The exception, the area that deserves to be taken quite seriously – is the risk of colorectal cancer. For some reason studies repeatedly show that people who eat red – mainly processed – meat specifically get more colon cancer.

The increase in risk for colorectal cancer in people who eat a lot of meat is generally low, around 20%. This can be compared with a massive 1,000% increase of risk for lung cancer for smokers. But even if the increase in risk is small, it’s been shown so often and so consistently that it probably is real.

Two days ago another study was published showing a slightly smaller risk for colorectal cancer in vegetarians. Why does red (processed) meat seem to slightly increase the risk of colorectal cancer? Continue Reading →

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The Greatest Gathering of Low-Carb Experts Ever?

What a gathering. The picture is from the night before the start of the LCHF conference in South Africa. Among many other low-carb experts you can see professor Tim Noakes, Dr Aseem Malhotra, Dr Eric Westman, Dr Jeffrey Gerber, Dr Michael Eades, Dr Mary Eades, Dr Jay Wortman and professor Stephen Phinney. And Zoë Harcombe who wrote the article about saturated fat that made headlines around the world last week. The next day Gary Taubes turned up as well.

Likely there has never been a greater gathering of LCHF experts in the same place before.

I’m happy to be here. You probably understand the lack of updates recently on the blog. I’ll be back soon with new energy and new insights.

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Headlines All Over the World: The Fear of Fat Was a Mistake from the Beginning

Butter, healthy again

Butter, healthy again

The advice from the 1980’s about avoiding butter lacked evidence. The entire Western world received dietary guidelines that had never been shown to do any good.

This may be old news for the regular reader here, but now the knowledge is spreading faster and faster around the world.

A new scientific review shows that the advice completely lacked evidence of any benefit when it was first introduced. This hit the big headlines around the world yesterday:

The old fear of fat is dying out. Those who are still afraid of natural fat today haven’t yet managed to update their knowledge. Unfortunately, this includes quite a few older experts who govern our official dietary guidelines.

Getting over the fear of fat is absolutely necessary to return to honest, real food, which is needed to get away from calorie obsession and starvation dieting. It’s necessary to turn round the epidemics of obesity and diabetes and other related disorders. It is necessary and it can’t wait.

Fortunately, repeated headlines like these show that the Food Revolution continues, all around the world. Continue Reading →

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The Beginning and End of the Fear of Fat

 
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This is the book that contributes to finally dismissing the old fear of fat. When the book The Big Fat Surprise came out in June last year, major American newspapers praised it. It has become a New York Times  best seller and The Wall Street Journal appointed it one of the best books of the year.

This book redefines food for many influential people and the fear of fat is losing its grip on the world.

Finally, I too have read the book. It’s a big book that initially is very similar to the fantastic Good Calories, Bad Calories (2007). But once you’ve read the first chapters you realize that this book is so much more. It’s an updated version with a somewhat different focus – and for most readers probably far more entertaining, clarifying and upsetting.

This is the definitive story on how fear of fat was based on how ambitious researchers and well-meaning politicians took short cuts and ignored the lack of real evidence. And as gigantic economic interests entered the picture things went very wrong.

The Problem with Fear of Fat

We know the result: instead of harmless fat – that we’ve been unnecessarily afraid of – people began to eat more sugar, wheat flour and other refined carbohydrates, which increase the fat-storing hormone insulin. Voilá: an epidemic of obesity and diabetes.

The book also goes in detail through the tragicomic and terrifying hunt for a replacement for natural saturated fat. Continue Reading →

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